Waterstones vs. Scary Sharp

At crossroads now between using waterstones or SS as my main means of sharping. In any case I`d like to do this once and stick with the decsion. Any opinions from the group ?
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JPEracing wrote:

I agree.
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Gerald Ross, Cochran, GA
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------------- You might find this article interesting.
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/pages/w00003.asp
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On Sat, 6 Mar 2004 06:59:15 -0500, "JPEracing"

I use both.
Scary sharp is much better for flattening backs, initial sharpening, and complete redos of edges. I prefer waterstones for a quick renewal of the bevel. If I had to choose ONE, I'd go with Scary Sharp.
SS is also better for preparing scraper edges, as the scraper can very easily damage a stone.
I use my jointer for SS, laying all the grits side by side, with a little 3M77. A spritz of WD40 lubes the paper, and a wipe down with WD40 cleans the 3M77 off the jointer. A quick swipe with paste wax on the jointer, and I'm done.
With this process, I end up with great edges and a clean jointer!
Barry
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On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 13:54:26 GMT, B a r r y
Same here

I use the edges (narrow sides) of the stone for stoning scrapers. No damage to the face of the stone that way.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html
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I've been using SS for the past year and for the most part I'm happy as a lark with it. I also have a maple board with the green honing compound from LV on it. I go down to .5 micron sandpaper but until I give it a few honing strokes at the end it doesn't do the "hair popping" trick (I have blank patches all over my forearm now ;)
I use polished granite tiles (12"x12") from home depot (or wherever) as the base. It takes 2 to get all my grits in (100, 150, 220, 320, 600, 1200, 5micron, .5micron).
My only complaint is that I can't seem to get my smoother iron (Knight-toolworks) ground down far enough to get past a couple of nicks in it -- man this stuff is HARD. I got some 50 grit so I might try that but I was thinking I might go get an 800 grit waterstone and see if that is any faster in getting it down to where I want it.
Oh, and I noticed someone else mentioned the FWW article just recently published -- it's been a big help in my technique which has sped up my sharpening quite a bit. I know the article is written for stones but I do pretty much the same thing on my sandpaper and it goes a lot faster. I never thought to only draw the bevel side back instead of moving it forwards and backwards -- much better that way.
Good luck, Mike

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Mike in Idaho wrote:

Does the article say that? That's kinda cool. I figured this one out on my own. It just seems to work a lot better, and the sandpaper is less likely to get cut too. Especially at the really high grits.
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I seriously doubt you're going to do this just once and stick with the decision... Just have a look in most shops and you'll probably find a half-dozen different methods we use for sharpening different type tools. One method will do a near perfect edge (waterstones) for you on your chisels and plane blades but you'll say to yourself one day - "I want a faster way" that isn't so messy and you'll start experimenting.
Ceramic, diamond stones, various grits of powders, grinders, belt sanders etc..., but sooner or later you'll find that Scary Sharp works well for most of your sharpening needs. It's quick, inexpensive, easy to master and most of all - it works well.
Now if you want a micron finish on some scalpel you happen to own and want to see your pearly whites reflecting off the steel and no scratches - I'd go with waterstones. I have 3 ceramic stones, they work nice but load up quickly and need to be scrubbed with an abrasive powder (Ajax) to get them clean. They also need water so it can get messy and in a cold shop, I'm not inclined to use them. Waterstones also require a good deal of maintenance in keeping them flat etc. There is an article in one of the recent issues (maybe FWW?) that has an piece about waterstones that you should read.
My vote for sharpening shop chisels, plane blades and scrappers is Scary Sharp.
For my wood turning tools, carving tools and special plane blades I use a Makita, slow speed sharpener with jigs, ceramic stones and diamond plate as well as a leather strop.
Then there are those moments when I'm using an old chisel and I just throw a 220 grit disc on my ROS and do a quickie on it. Works fine for "course" type work.
But should you find the one perfect method - we would like to know what that might be so we can give it a try. Hell, we've tried just about everything else!
Bob S.

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I forogt to add my real answer to this question.
Water stones are farkin' EXPENSIVE, and they need constant care and feeding.
Sandpaper is cheap. All but the very highest and the very lowest grits have a long useful life. (The big grits wear out quickly and the fine grits clog quickly.) Sandpaper always stays as flat as the surface you put it on, so you never have to worry about doing screwy rounded things to your edges.
It's a no brainer for me. I have several tools that don't hold an edge very long, and I have to re-hone frequently. I'd rather do this using a method that's simple and fool proof. Plus water stones are farkin' EXPENSIVE, and I'm a cheap SOB.
(Plus I have a boatload of granite chunks laying around. That helps too.)
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i just learn to use dull tools. <g>
no really....
randy

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You need and want both. If you can afford the waterstones, getem. If you can afford only one, start with the 6000. Scary sharp is nearly free, so it's a no brainer.
-- Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com/woodshop

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On Sat, 6 Mar 2004 08:30:27 -0800, "Pounds on Wood"

free? it may seem so at first but sandpaper adds up fast. the finer grits can gets spendy. Plus it can wear fast and will wear unevenly just like a stone.
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I seriously doubt you're going to do this just once and stick with the decision... Just have a look in most shops and you'll probably find a half-dozen different methods we use for sharpening different type tools. One method will do a near perfect edge (waterstones) for you on your chisels and plane blades but you'll say to yourself one day - "I want a faster way" that isn't so messy and you'll start experimenting.
Ceramic, diamond stones, various grits of powders, grinders, belt sanders etc..., but sooner or later you'll find that Scary Sharp works well for most of your sharpening needs. It's quick, inexpensive, easy to master and most of all - it works well.
Now if you want a micron finish on some scalpel you happen to own and want to see your pearly whites reflecting off the steel and no scratches - I'd go with waterstones. I have 3 ceramic stones, they work nice but load up quickly and need to be scrubbed with an abrasive powder (Ajax) to get them clean. They also need water so it can get messy and in a cold shop, I'm not inclined to use them. Waterstones also require a good deal of maintenance in keeping them flat etc. There is an article in one of the recent issues (maybe FWW?) that has an piece about waterstones that you should read.
My vote for sharpening shop chisels, plane blades and scrappers is Scary Sharp.
For my wood turning tools, carving tools and special plane blades I use a Makita, slow speed sharpener with jigs, ceramic stones and diamond plate as well as a leather strop.
Then there are those moments when I'm using an old chisel and I just throw a 220 grit disc on my ROS and do a quickie on it. Works fine for "course" type work.
But should you find the one perfect method - we would like to know what that might be so we can give it a try. Hell, we've tried just about everything else!
Bob S.

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