Waterstone sharpening - wow!

Page 2 of 3  


What he said.
Just like sanding wood. if things are going too slowly, you're typically at too fine of a grit.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Continuous surface diamond plates are fast, I just got a DMT Diasharp 600 grit. Sharpening a knife takes about four to five strokes per side to gain a real beginning edge, I was happy with that. There are also the japanese Kanaban soft steel plates that you apply diamond grits to, those should be fast too I trust, but never tried yet.
--
Alex - newbie_neander in woodworking
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 02:18:15 GMT, "Leon"

FWIW, I've found a coarse DMT diamond stone to be excellent at flattening waterstones. I like it better than loose abrasives, ceramic flattening plates, etc...
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 01:09:11 GMT, the opaque "BillyBob"

Can you say "DMT"? I knew you could. For flattening, though, you could use a nice coarse set from www.harborfreight.com . $12.99 or less on sale, which is often.
#36196-6VGA 3-pc 1x3" set $7.99 #36799-3VGA 3-pc 2x6" set $12.99 Ooh, here's a new one I hadn't seen until now: http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber867 It's a 2x6" 4-diamond-sided block with 200, 300, 400, and 600 grit plates on it. Cool. $14.99 One of these would be good for taking chips out of good irons before sharpening them on the 600 grit DMT and 1,200 grit Scary Paper(tm) before stropping.
--
"I'm sick and tired of having to rearrange my life
because of what the STUPIDEST people *might* do or
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bob...
Look for a "friend of a friend" that happens to be a machinist...chances are pretty good that s/he will have access to a surface grinder. It's realy quite easy to do, altho the easiest way requires grinding the sides of chisels so they might wind up a little thinner than you started, but it does make it faster. It's how I do my chisels...granted, I have no mortice chisels that I need to be too concerned about the width.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Depends on what they do but around here, the machine shop that has a surface grinder is the exception, not the rule. We have one but we have a complete die shop. Why grind the sides? I don't.

are
does
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Snip of a bunch of stuff.

I cracked up laughing when I realized that it was you! When I read your name as the OP after reading your discovery of this new delight, I sprayed the screen. I'd thought your being the perfectionist and me having seen the quality of your work, how did he get by before now?? I found these stones about 14 years ago. Amazing how quietly the chisels sharpen to that kind of edge. Quite messy but keep them in a Tupperware container to catch the water and its a bit easier. Nothing like a mirror surface on the back of the irons and chisels. Well I soon tired of the whole affair but would not give up on water stones. Wait till you get your hands on a Tormek. Yeah...fast, less messy, expensive. LOL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Leon" wrote in message

You got one? ... I'll be right over. ;)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 7/31/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes I do..for about 4 years now. With all the attachments that you could get with it then. Let me know if you want to come over and use it. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Leon" wrote in message

the
LOL. What can I say, I'm a cautious man who stays away from the bleeding edge and I make damn sure technology works before I leap ... hell, it's only been a couple of years since we moved the outhouse inside.
... now, if I can just figure out how to get it to drain outside.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/07/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Drain? Just put a deep hole in the floor under it. LOL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman,
Spend a little more and get an 8000 stone. If you're amazed now wait till you hone on an 8000....in fact, I'd forego the 6000 and jump from 4000 to 8000.
My friend gave me a CRKT knife saying it doesn't get very sharp. I put it to a 4000 stone and it'll slice through a paper's edge. :-)
Layne
snip

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ahhh... Shapton ceramic compostite...Hello. This is the way to go with DMT Diamond 200 grit for flattening. Less mess and you don't have to soak them just use a spray then go to a Takenoko 8000. I could shave a rabbits testicles after working a blade with this group. Not that I've ever done that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have the Kitayama Super Polishing Stone from Japan Woodworker. Funny I could have sworn mine was #8000 grit, but on JW's website it's graded at #12000...still 8000 or 12000 my tools are unbelievably sharp after I get rid of the fine grind marks left by the 4000 stone.
Layne
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've got the diasharp course 3" x 8" stone, it is still slow to flatten plane backs. I think an 80 grit drywall screen to be faster, then moving up the sequence.
After going to 180, I use my diasharp, then onto the Shaptons. Only takes a few seconds each after the 80 grit gets you flat. You have to be carefull with chisels so as to not dub the sides on the back, with the SS method.
Alan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've been using the King stones, through to the G-1 for quite a few years.
I keep the stones that aren't mounted to wood in a drywall bucket, so they are always wet. The S-1 and the G-1 don't need this but the more porous stones can take a bit of time to go from dry to useable, if you don't keep them soaked.
I have found that it is worth flattening these stones on some 600 wet or dry, laid on a piece of 1/2" float glass, to get them flat before use - and to flatten them again, when you are done.
I have a cedar board that I routed out to create a well for the stones to sit in. It helps to keep them from sliding around when you bear down on them during your figure eights. I clamp the board to the bench and have a go at them.
The use of the nagura can take some getting used to, in my experience. I find that rubbing it flat on one side, and making sure that the fine stone is flat, goes a long way towards bringing up a good even paste, and making the job go right.
Some guys will take the paste from one stone to the next finer one, but I've never been a fan of this. It seems to me that the iron should be cleaned before going on.
It is messy, but it ain't no messier than an oil stone, and your wife will holler a lost less about water stains than oil ones, I suspect.
BTW - please don't take that woman's kitchen implements no more, lessin' you want her to start borrying yer drill and a fair sized spade bit ta whip taters with.
(that's a bad road to start down -damhikt)
Tom Watson - WoodDorker tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/ (website)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snip

or the router to whip up some heavy cream with the wire whisk:-) Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No threat of that. Near as I can tell, you can't buy heavy creme in the US. What we used to call milk is now half and half.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is damned funny, and all too true.
Good one, CW.
Tom Watson - WoodDorker tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/ (website)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Reminds me of a job I had at a cafeteria when I first came to the city from living on a farm. I tasted the milk and told the mangement that something was wrong with it. They tasted it and said it was fine. And they ran around and had a number of people taste it to make sure. Then they asked me why I thought it was bad.
I told them that it was watered down. They asked me where I was from. I told them a farm. They all laughed. They went on to inform me that this was the city. And they did things differrent than the farm. It bacame something of a stnding joke that I was from the farm. Nothing hurtful. Just some cityslickers asking all kinds of questions about another kind of life.
I used to work on dairy farms. And the milk would foam up because of the high butterfat content. Even so called "whole" milk is watered down and has cream taken out of it.
Remeber when you could buy juice that had particulate matter in it and was thick? Now all you can buy is the strined, watered down pretend juices.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.