Wasteful Packaging

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I was talking to someone a little while ago about wasteful packaging. It appears to be even worse than I imagined.
I recently ordered a DeWalt D26453K random orbit sander, the one with that comes with the big, black, plastic case containing the sander and absolutely nothing else. Cost? $103.99. From the same company, I also priced the D26453 sander without the case. Cost? $114.99. Explain that to me?
With marketing like that, it's no wonder we're being inundated with garbage. Future societies, if they do eventually come to exist, will certainly look on us as the garbage generations. I also predict that future space exploration will spend a good deal of it's time transporting garbage to dead planets or shooting garbage into suns for disposal. Maybe we'll get lucky and find a true method of matter/energy conversion.
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I totally support throwing garbage into volcanos.
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Wouldn't that put up ash, the same as burning stuff now?
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"Upscale" wrote:

Pretty straight forward, theft and volume.
The oversize packaging helps to thwart retail theft, therefore increased cost of packaging is offset by reduction in theft.
Since most of the sales are of product are with packaging, providing a product for sale without packaging represents a special which translates into lower volume, thus higher cost.
Higher sales price will also make the special "go away".
Lew
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I guess that makes sense, but it sure seems screwed up. In any event, the sander case is doing duty for a kid who now proudly gets to display his new DeWalt lunch box.
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Upscale wrote:

I saw a news item that Amazon is to start offering various products with minimal and bio-degradable packaging. No retail stores so no problems with shoplifting. John
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They employ people don't they?
I wonder who much goes missing directly from their warehouse.
Back in the good (bad?) old days when Coventry made cars, you could, if so inclined, buy whole engines that had somehow managed to find their way out of the manufacturing plant without being noticed.
--
Stuart Winsor

For Barn dances and folk evenings in the Coventry and Warwickshire area
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"Stuart" wrote:

AKA: Internal shrinkage
Not much is said about it, but "Internal shrinkage" has been a major problem at Home Depot for years.
Lew
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On Mon, 22 Dec 2008 00:44:45 GMT, Lew Hodgett cast forth these pearls of wisdom...:

Actually, internal shrink at HD is not much of a problem. The much bigger shrink problem at HD is outright theft (people walk out with nice new power tools and nobody can stop them), product damage ("normal" shipping and handling damage, sub-contractor damage, etc.). If you could see the biggest shrink items by department at HD, you'd quickly see that it is not stuff employees walk off with.
--

-Mike-
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"Mike Marlow" wrote:

Since I know some HD employees who are in a position to have knowledge of the situation, I'll stand by the comment that internal shrinkage is a real problem.
That's not to say that customers are not a major problem when it comes to "5 finger discount" activity, but when employees are taken into custody and handcuffed while on the sales floor, on a regular basis, you have to wonder.
BTW, this is not isolated to one store.
I won't go into detail here, but there are some amazing schemes attempted to steal from HD.
I'm sure other retailers have there own problems.
Lew
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote

There was a theft ring that targeted Home Depot here years ago. They had somebody from the inside supply information as to when certain items, including appliances, were delivered at night. The theives than just waited and loaded up the items onto their own truck. The big boxes of merchandise never even entered the store. They were snatched from the back lot. It went on for several months before they figured out what was happening.
And yes, it was an inside job.
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On Tue, 23 Dec 2008 15:18:51 GMT, Lew Hodgett cast forth these pearls of wisdom...:

Fair enough. But - I don't speak on the stories of other people. I have seen the Home Depot shrink reports. Besides power tools, the two biggest shrink items are patio sets and refrigerators. It's not hard to find - it's posted in every store. One thing to remember is that "internal" shrink does not mean employee theft. Shrink comes in a lot of forms, and it includes damage, which far outweighs incidents of employee theft.

Your friends either work in a rather unusual Home Depot store, or they are grossly misleading you. Evidence that they are misleading you (or at least strongly suggests that they are) is that Home Depot would not arrest an employee on the sales floor. This would be handled in a discrete manner, out of the eye of customers. Not only is it bad for business to do this publicly, but it leaves the store open to litigation that the chain tries very hard to avoid.

Well - it's not common throughout the chain.

Sure - people can be very creative. Some don't even have to get creative. It's not uncommon for customers to simply walk out with a product. The alarms go off, and (especially when the store is busy), the associates are so used to hearing them go off, that they don't even notice it. Out walks the "customer" with hands full.
Some are even craftier. They have figured out the ways to defeat the hard tags and the soft tags. When these guys walk out, they don't even set off the alarms.
The really good ones know when the LPA is working and when he/she is not. The LPA is the only one authorized to tackle (if necessary) a thief - though most won't. Associates and managers are not allowed to apprehend a thief, other than to ask the thief to stop. If the thief doesn't cordially accommodate that request, they can't do anything except maybe get a license number on the car they leave in.
--

-Mike-
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"Mike Marlow" wrote:

That wouldn't surprise me at all: however, here in SoCal. the garden seems to take quite a hit.

Okay, was not considering anything but internal theft in my definition. Strictly speaking, that is an incomplete definition.

Of course it is discrete, but they are still cuiffed and taken off the floor during business hours.
Typically these are not associates on the sales floor.

Can't comment outside an area that includes maybe a dozen stores, but one thing is crystal clear.
The day Nardelli showed up, HD quite being a fun place to work.
It's no wonder Welch didn't pick him to run GE.
The morale of the staff has gone in the tank.

So I have been told.

So much for the loss preventation group.

I'm aware of that.
Lew
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Mike Marlow wrote:

I'm blown away by how often the door alarm goes off, and the staff waves them on.
You'd swear the customer is paying for something and leaving with stuff they didn't pay for. Of course, no one checks...
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On Mon, 22 Dec 2008 00:05:48 +0000 (GMT), Stuart cast forth these pearls of wisdom...:

It's a 60, 61, 62, 63, custom automobile. I got it one piece at a time. You might say I went right to the factory and picked it up - it's cheaper that way...
--

-Mike-
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Yes, I heard about that (urban myth?), a Cadillac wasn't it?
--
Stuart Winsor

For Barn dances and folk evenings in the Coventry and Warwickshire area
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

We live in a world of very cheap RFID...
Large packaging is no longer an excuse.
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B A R R Y wrote:

The packaging may take up a good deal of volume due to air space, but how much actual material is in that plastic box? I suspect that if one were to compress it to a flat object (i.e., flatten, not compress the actual material), it's not all that outrageous.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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Kreg Mini..
Kit is the jig, drill bit, stop collar.
Retail 14.95
replacement drill bit 15.99 (no collar) replacement collar 2.99
Explain, please, someone?
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Bored Borg wrote:

Buy the kit and give the old jig to some worthy soul.
"The first one is free..." only /sounds/ familiar :)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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