Warped TS blade -repairable?

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On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 03:29:22 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@esper.com (Dave Mundt) wrote:

not to mention that circular saw blades are thicker than your standard card scraper, which makes them good candidates for donor material for cutters for lots of scratch stock blades and specialized little cutting tools. I have an old 10" blade I've been cutting chunks off of for a while now....
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Leon wrote:

Yeah, but those come in standard shapes. Make your own and you can customize them to the job at hand.
I've never done it with a TS blade, but I buy those cheap Japanese saws with the impulse hardened (read: non-resharpenable) teeth and when the teeth wear, they're scraper material.
--RC
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Dont atke a chance on your safety, Fingers and hands are priceless. Throw it away

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Ya know, if you can get it to warp a bit more you might have yourself a decent dado blade. <g>
Jim
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Wow - Thanks for all the responses.
I will replace the blade and get a new one -but not throw it away ;~) Seems like such a waste though since the warp is not "that" bad. I'll probably keep it around as a backup, in case I need to cut something nasty I don't want to expose my new blade to..
BTW: are the <MUCH> more expensive TS blades (Forrest, CMT, Dimar Freud) really worth the 3x $$$ cost. Keep in mind I'm just a weekend hack, "building" up my skills with projects for around the house. I'm not sure I could justify a $150+ TS blade to SWMBO
Cheers,
BR
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As a beginner, I'd say yes. Let's say you want to make mortise and tenon joints. One can spend much $$ for a machine (or many machines) to do this, but a rather good job can be done with a simple router and a TS. (And, even with Neander tools, if one is so inclined.) Better technique can create a better result. But with a TS blade, AFAIK, no technique with a so-so TS blade can give you as good a result as you can get with the same technique and a great TS blade. And, the better blades do give better results.
Overall, FWIW, the way I look at it, there are so many variables when woodworking that I like to eliminate some by getting the right tool. It is why I did not buy a used TS and would not buy a used jointer, though I would buy other used/refurbed tools. Even a new TS has to be set up, and even a new one can be defective, but I want to reduce the possibility that bad results are the fault of the tool. So, I have ponied up for the Forrest blades. -- Igor
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igor wrote:

I believe high-quality tools make a bigger difference for a beginner because they cause fewer problems. An experienced woodworker can anticipate and correct for more problems that someone who is just learning.
Of course the experienced people are also the ones who are most insistent on having high-quality tools.
I think once you know what it is you want in a tool, you should spend as much as you can to get the best you can afford.
--RC
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wrote:

Agreed.
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I was into wood working seriously for about 17 years before buying a Forrest. I had known about the Forrest about that long and did own some pretty good blades. I wish I had bought the Forrest to begin with. I never take it off the saw unless I am cutting questionable material such as PT and framing lumber. With a properly tuned saw the blade will instill greater confidence. I have found that it stays sharp much longer than the other brands that I owned and it rips and cross cuts almost perfectly. Shiny smooth rips and crosscuts dependent on how flat and straight your wood is. In the long run, I believe the blade to be cheaper in that I use it for all my cuts. I recommend the regular kerf.
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No doubt Forest is a quality blade. However, I have used for many years blades made by a local sharpening shop. I have 3 Forest blades, like and use them.
Point is, check with a local service that sharpens blades for commercial applications and see what they have, many times they are competitively priced and no waiting.
Dave
Leon said:

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I agree that this can be an alternative. I use a good sharpening service for years. Computerized robots that recognized the blade when returned for additional sharpening and they were sharp. Unfortunately they are unable to straighten a bent blade and do not make blades. They do sell Systematic and Amana of which I used Systematic for many years.
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<snip>

I agree with Dave. I've used Forrest blades, and they are good, but no better results than well treated quality blades from other front-line sources.
The archives hold a thread from about a year ago on sharpening services that Wreckers use and recommend. Google that, and find one near you that someone here thinks highly of. And then spend your money with them. And listen to what they tell you.
My fellow, who's only been at this for 28 years, sold me on FS Tools blades. It turns out I'm not the only one with a Unisaw who uses these, although my saw is considerably less experienced than his...
And I had about $40 left over to buy timber...
Patriarch
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Lots of folks are pretty fond of some of the blades you mention. From my perspective, there just isn't enough of a benefit to the blades that cost that much, to make them worth the investment. If I could see a significant difference I'd be happy to go with them because I do believe in spending money on truly better tools, but I just can't see it. I've been woodworking for 30 years, never as a professional, but I have produced some nice cabinetry and furniture. I'd put myself squarely in the rank of above average, or very good, but not artisan. Basic blades have never posed a problem for me, have never caused any problems in the work I was doing. I've only had to buy a couple of blades for my TS in all the years I've owned it and none of them have been more than your basic 40-60 tooth blade similar to what you'd find in your local BORG or hardware store. I've got a DeWalt blade in it now and a lot of folks don't like them, but it cuts. It cuts straight and true, and it stays on the arbor when it spins. What more can I expect of a blade? After that, it's up to me to get the wood to the blade at the right point. I've had this blade on the saw for quite a while - can't really remember when I put it on. It's sawn a lot of different hardwoods and softwoods. I don't even think about it - I just saw with it.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
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