Warped TS blade -repairable?

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I have a moderately warped 10" 60T cc / finishing blade that I use mostly for MDF. It's nearly new and decent quality, not the best but not cheap either.
I was wondering if it's possible to straighten it the next time I bring it in for sharpening?
Thanks,
BR
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A couple of things:
1) Do you know, specifically, why it warped? 2) If not, and if it is nearly new, you might have a product defect issue that would result in a replacement blade (for that matter are you sure it was ok when purchased).
If it cannot be replaced as deficient, and the warp is significant, you might want to pitch it. I am just thinking in terms of material scoring and unnecessary wear and tear on bearings, trunnion, nerves, etc.

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Thanks for the reply,
Oh I know EXACTLY why it's warped... A brief lapse in concentration + some nasty kickback/binding = one warped blade. :-( It's only a $45 CAD blade that still cuts "ok", but it add's a bit of vibration to the saw. And it <rubs-rubs-rubs-rubs> when I use my cross cut sled...
I would love to just replace it, but if it's cheaper to sharpen and straighten it that's what I would do. -So do you know if a TS blade can be straightened? TIA,
BR
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"Birdy Num-Num" wrote in message

I would toss it and buy another. As Leon said, Forrest may do it, but it will cost you at least $45, and likely a bit more for shipping. The number one reason for a warped blade in my shop is forgetting to take out the zero clearance insert before cranking in some tilt.
I hate it when that happens ...
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Hey but it pops that tight fitting insert right outa there.. '~)
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"Leon" wrote in message

Forrest 40 T Insert Remover: $96; Straighten warped Forrest 40 T Insert Remover: $45; Total: $199.99 (shipping/repairing dent in wall/band aids included)
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Knot on you head when the saw throws the zero-clearance insert at you: Priceless
(well probably not considering medical costs)
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Gee, how much of a dumbass can one be? Whoops. I was looking in the mirror.
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"igor" wrote in message

zero
Sounds like you've visited that elevated plane of consciousness? ... but, if you haven't, you will!
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Yes, but it's now a warped plane.
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wrote:> Gee, how much of a dumbass can one be? Whoops. I was looking in the

Damn, that mirror was in my garage last night. I was cleaning the saw dust up using the gas powered leaf blower. I blow everything out the garage door. Well, I also keep a plastic recycle bin under the jointer to catch 85% of the shavings. OK , I'll use the excuse that it was getting dark and I was between the light and the dark out doors and.....
Basically I was finished when I accidentally aimed the leaf blower in to that almost full bin of shavings. I had a mess 3 times bigger that when I started. It only took 1 second to almost empty that bin.
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Not all sharpeners offer this service. I have a great local sharpener that lets the computers and robots do all the work but they do not straighten blades.
Since you know how it was warped, Forrest offers this service. They will sharpen and true the blade for a little additional. How ever it may cost you more to have it repaired than replaced. I spent $41.95 to make a Forrest WWII cut like new again after I bent the blade. This price was for sharpening, retrueing, test cutting, and return shipping of a 3 year old 40 tooth blade.

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If the blade costs < $50 - pitch it and buy a new one. It costs about $40 to true and re-sharpen a blade.
Be sure you figure out how and why it became warped first!
$=USD
Dave

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    Greetings and Salutations...
wrote:

    I would suggest taking that "pitch it" as shorthand for "replace the blade with a new one". I would not pitch the sawblade, because, among other things, one can cut several REALLY good quality cabinet scrapers out of the disk.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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Is it really worth the effort? IIRc you buy several for $10.
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    Greetings and Salutations...
On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 01:39:27 GMT, "Leon"

    Hum...that is kind of a subjective thing. I know that it is possible to find good tools at decent prices these days. However, for me, there are other, overriding factors. There is the the idea of cutting down the volume in the trash flow to the dumps in America. Then, with me, it is usually that I need a weird shaped scraper at 3:00 in the morning, and there are darned few woodworking tool shops open at that hour. There is also the fact that I really hate to throw anything away (which is why my relatives think I live in a junkyard *smile*), but rather prefer to recycle and reuse it if at all possible.     I really understand, though, that I am kind of out there...and NORMAL folks would just pitch the blade and buy a new one.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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Seriousely though, how do you cut the blade? And isn't a blade too thick? Or, maybe a thicker scraper is better.
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    Greetings and salutations....
On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 03:39:25 GMT, "Leon"

    The steel in most blades is NOT that hard. It cuts easily with a hand hacksaw, although, I tend to use either the Sawzall, or, (these days) the small, hand-held Milwaukee Deepcut metalcutting bandsaw.     It is true that the blade scraper is thicker than many of them. However, I tend to prefer that. I find that I can often turn two burrs, one on each side, and, get twice the work time out before having to re-sharpen.     They also work pretty well for making "scratch stocks" for cutting custom beads into board edges and such.     Regards     Dave Mundt.
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I use a jewelers saw and it cuts with no problems. With a fine( i.g. 1/0) blade you can cut very small radii. Larry
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On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 23:28:05 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@esper.com (Dave Mundt) wrote:

But it's usually L6 steel, which will harden well and easily - it's useful stuff.
The rec.knives FAQs are worth reading.
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