Warm Shop Shoes

Page 2 of 3  


Mikes idea about cardboard is a good one. I have done electric installations in new construction all concrete buildings in 5 degree weather. Stood on cardboard and feet did ok. But had to stop sometimes due to the hands getting very numb despite gloves. Warren
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Kamik hunter boots, good to minus 40.
http://www.kamik.com/GenfootWeb/servlet/webProductDisplay.webProductDisplaySrv?currentMode=DETAIL&curCatalog=2008&curSeason=WINTER2008&curRow=62
$0 bucks at Crappy tire, $60 for the steel toes & sole plate safety ones. Trust me, that's what I use on my unheated shop floor and I live in the Yukon
Luigi Zanasi
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jan 4, 1:42 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Holy snappin farts, Batman.... LUIGI!!! How the hell are you ?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hey Rob,
In answer to your question, getting better: I felt like shit since last Janaury, had a heart attack in June & am slowly recuperating. Haven't been in the shop for a long time. I've been lurking & finally figured out how to get on Google Groups. Say Hi to Dave Balderstone for me (and all the others who block google groups).
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jan 4, 10:22 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Passed it along.
Shit, dude, that sucks. Glad to hear you're okay. I hadn't heard anything for awhile and thought that'd you'd write when you would get some llecktricity up there and maybe even intertubes. Then I thought maybe somebody pushed you off on an ice-flo.... or maybe malamutes got a hold of you..or...or..
Anyway, good to hear from you and that you're recovering. Make some sawdust soon, eh?
Rob
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Anyone who's ever stepped on a nail would appreciate that.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You have a lot of nails laying about on your shop floor? Isn't that a broom and a dust pan over in the corner...? ;)
The boots that Luigi finds workable for the Yukon just _might_ be a bit of overkill for someone who is looking for more warmth (not protection) than loafers.
I find that my legs get much more tired standing on concrete, and my tired legs feel the cold much more. Both good footwear and anti- fatigue mats will help. The anti-fatigue mats will also help regardless of the temperature and footwear.
R
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RicodJour wrote:

No one plans on accidents, that's why their accidents. Seat belts and all.

Tru dat. I have a bunch of those 2x2 ones. They do offer lots of insulation. I use them for everything, including working under the car in the driveway.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually, Glen did mention his duck boots, which are probaby almost as warm but a PITA to lace up all the time. Note that I also wear those boots in summer both in the shop and while gardening: I like the steel toe. They are not excessively hot in the summer. You can get them without the steel toe & save yourself $40.00 (but not necessarily other kinds of pain).
I also wear them while sexually harassing and hopefully murdering gentle innocent forest creatures.
Luigi Zanasi
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If Bob Marley had those on his feet.......
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use "anti-fatigue" mats in front of the bench and lathe, or any other place I spend a lot of time.. Keeps the cold off your feet and helps your back.. YMWV
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use wool sox and clogs in an unheated garage. There are two aspects that I think are important here - first, my clogs have thick, thick soles, so there is a lot of insulation between my feet and the floor. Second, and almost more important, my clogs are a loose fit, so there is no compression of the foot at all. This means that the full insulating thickness of the sox are available to insulate; the feet can breathe easily, and also kinda move around in the socks, and circulation in the foot is unimpeded. I also use Crocs clogs if there is no snow on the driveway between the house and the garage. The ease of slipping on and off, the comfort, and the warmth in relatively thin wool sox (Wigwam model 625 wool sport socks) are all very positive points for me. Finally, I most always wear a hat (good wool watch cap).
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Have a Farm and Ranch store nearby or anyplace that sells horse stall mats? For around $50 you can get a nice 3/4" thick rubber mat 4' x 6' or 8' made from recycled tires that gives you a great mat to stand on while working and will last a lifetime. You can easily cut this into smaller sizes and place them near the tools or bench where you work. In addition to the insulation value in the winter, your feet and legs will thank you all year long. Less stress and fatigue.
Bob S.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the ideas. I already have anti fatigue mats around my workbench. I don't want to put more around because space it tight and it is hard to move around the mobile equipment on the pads. When I am working on the pads my feet do stay warmer, however, when I walk around the shop my feet get cold. Once cold, they never seem to warm up again. I think I will try the Scholls inserts.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or go completely to meat powered tools... I'm always warmer in my shop while using my hand planes and panel saws. ;~) I also wear medium weight wool hiking socks inside Merrell insulated mocs. Easy on, easy off and the wool socks insulate and keep my feet dry of perspiration.
John
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yup, maintaining core temperature works surprisingly well. The old wives' nonsense of dressing more warmly and overing the head is worth a try. (I think it was mentioned but instantly blown off without further comment.) I wear an electric vest on the motorcycle, and the fingers and hands stay toasty warm in summer weight gloves. Overhead halogens work really well to warm the shop.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
MikeWhy wrote:

Tru dat. When the core gets cold, first thing the body does is restrict blood flow to the extremities, and blood is the oil of the body's radiator. Nothing is further out than the feet.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-MIKE- wrote:

Especially when the natural covering is no longer doing its job. Not that I'd know anything about that or anything.
/thinking about trying some of that fertilizer stuff for up there. Not for vanity, but just because I'm tired of being cold when seated under an air conditioner or when it's cold outside, or conversely having the sun beat down when it's hot.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Towards that end I also wear a Filson wool vest... starts out green in the fall but is rather brown by spring. ;~)
John
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So, get some lace-in zippers and fit 'em to your duck boots. Quick-on, quick-off, and the duck boots won't track sawdust beyond the little cubby next to the shop door where you store them.
Zipper inserts for tall boots are available at shoe stores near military bases...
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.