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Didn't look at the second link. Is this the same as what I had seen before? <grin> Have you any idea of the costs?
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Han
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Greg Guarino wrote:

Don't neglect attaching them to the wall or doing something else to prevent their tipping.
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On 9/14/2012 7:25 AM, dadiOH wrote:

+1
I passed on a stand-alone cabinet job last year because the prospective client poo-poohed the idea of anti-tip measures ... she had one small boy, and another in the oven. I can't afford to risk what's taken years to build defending a liability suit, insurance or no.
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On 9/12/2012 1:50 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

1. Buy a Kreg jig 2. Buy pre-finished 3/4 plywood 3. Build the boxes 4. Build a sub base to set cabinet on. 4. Build a face frame 5. Finish with gel stain and varnish.
The face frame is optional depending on your taste.
No face frame means flush mounted doors.
You need four doors for a cabinet that tall in my opinion.
You might also consider a wardrobe on top and drawers on the bottom.
Like this:
http://www.sauder.com/furniture/product.asp?p 59
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On 9/13/2012 2:47 PM, Pat Barber wrote:

Well, that's remarkably like what I was planning, if the word "planning" can be applied to the random musing that I've done so far.

Haven't tried gel stain yet. But I have lots of scrap pieces, many of which already have test finishes on them. Time to make some more I guess.

I had some similar cabinets made some years ago. They have two full-height vertical doors. As I mentioned before, they are "faux" panel style, 3/4" ply with 2" x 1/4" strips glued on to mimic three vertical panels. I haven't had any trouble with those doors, perhaps because they are essentially a solid piece of relatively thick plywood. Are you suggesting that a tall true panel door might warp?

That's pretty handsome looking. I might consider something like that, if I can get over my fear of drawers. :)
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email.me:
Snip
I made some cabinets for an entertainment center using maple plywood, and some 1/4x1" maple strips as "banding". It was a pain to get them down to be even on both sides with the plywood. The iron-on maple banding veneer was much easier. Finished with blondest shellac as a seal coat, plus a couple more coats. Then shellac- alkyd(?)poly mix, and finally poly- pastewax mix with a touch of shellac. The latter a couple of coats. Then rubbing, and the finish is looking like it will last.
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On 9/13/2012 3:46 PM, Han wrote:

I think I can be of some assistance here, which is rare given my modest knowledge. I used a rabbet plane for a similar job. I set the fence on the plane to the thickness of the edge piece, so I couldn't accidentally cut into the face of the plywood. Then I set the depth stop so that the plane would cut the edge piece exactly flush with the surface of the ply. Someone with more developed skills might be able to do this by "feel", but it worked nicely for me.
The iron-on maple banding veneer

I have to say, that looks like an argument for prefinished ply, at least for a busy guy with limited skills. I count six or seven steps, something I might try on a smaller project, but not on this one.
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Great idea for a needed tool I don't yet have! Thanks!! Which brand and model do you have?

Well, I do take my (retired) time, that is true, but shellac dries in minutes, so several caots go on really fast. The other coats don't take that much time either. So for me a little more time is fine, versus the (likely) expense of prefinished ply. Although, maple ply of good quaity isn't exactly cheap.
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This one:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/6980398958/lightbox /
It's a Stanley #78, inherited from my Dad, who's still around but not using such things anymore. You can use the right arrow key to see some more views.

What do you do between coats?
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Sorry for the name confusion, more than one person in our family uses this computer
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Looks BEAUTIFUL!! And the other pics are great as well, at least the ones I looked at!

FB, other computer stuff, just being retired.
As far as what I do between coats on the wood, with the coats of shellac, nothing. Light sanding later on, and with the pastewax final coats, apply with #0000 steel wool, or similar non-steel, drying for a half-1 hour, then buffing with a car buffer (something Sears sold me decades ago).
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Han wrote:

Got a router? You can do the same thing with it.
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On 9/14/2012 8:30 AM, dadiOH wrote:

1x2 oak edge that I had glued around the perimeter of a desktop (with the 1.5" dimension vertical). I thus had a 3/4" thick surface to take down a very small amount, and only in certain areas. I think I may even have asked for advice here.
My fear was that I'd have trouble keeping the router square with only a 1.5" surface for the plate to ride on. Someone with more skill and confidence might not have that problem. That notwithstanding, the plane did a nice job and I wouldn't hesitate to do it that way again.
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On 9/14/2012 8:32 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

That's where a laminate trimmer comes in handy, like the Bosch Colt.
My problem with using a plane on plywood banding is the sheer thinness of veneer in today's plywood. Even with my sharp, low angle, Veritas block plane, I've knicked about as much veneer as I've gouged with a router down through the years ... sometimes the grain just works against you.
That said, I trimmed all the banding on these parts yesterday with a top bearing, flush trim, bit in the router table, with a split fence and featherboard:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopCustomMedicineCabinets#5787295307276757538
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJigsFixturesMethods#5788049653985780754
Much less chance of a screw-up when you're on a deadline, out of material, and with no spare parts that would take hours to re-cut if you slipped. ... and that is ALWAYS when it happens.
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Swingman wrote:

I often use an itsy-bitsy Stanley...don't recall the number but it is about 1/2 the size of a block plane, fits easily in one hand and lets me use my palm and finger tips to guide/control it.
With either it or a block plane I point it about 60 degrees to what I want to cut and then sort of slide the blade along the high edge. Much easier to avoid nicking the veneer.
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I usually use a smooth or block plane to knock the banding down to a RCH of the plywood, then use a card scraper to finish up. The probability of tear-out on the ply is much less.
scott
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On 9/14/2012 11:19 AM, Swingman wrote:

I have one, but I still wasn't confident that I wouldn't let the thing tilt at some point, gouging out the edging.

In my case, the edging was solid...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/6233523401/in/set-72157627751790027/lightbox /
... and the rabbet plane's "fence" made it impossible to cut anything but the edge piece, handy for a guy like me. I had actually made a small mock-up with the same materials (but only nailed together) as a test before I did the trimming on the desktop.

https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopCustomMedicineCabinets#5787295307276757538
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJigsFixturesMethods#5788049653985780754 My work piece was 72" x 32", so the router table was out.

No deadline but my own, but I was also well motivated not to screw up what had cost a good bit of my time.
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