Want longer cord for Delta TS

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Want to replace current 10' cord with 25' cord. Is 14-3 large enough?
Saw is 3 HP 220V. TIA, F
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This is from a google search.
Marv
The general rule of thumb for picking wiring size is 14-gauge wire is rated for currents up to 15 amps. Circuits in many homes, especially cost-conscious tract homes, use 14-gauge wiring in most of the house except the kitchen; even in the garage. This is a distinct disadvantage nowadays due to hair dryers in bathrooms, computers and other equipment in bedroom/home offices, etc. Avoid 14-gauge wiring in any new home if you are building.
12-gauge wire for currents up to 20 amps. But a 20-amp breaker must not be loaded above 16 amps of continuous current draw. This is adequate for most home shops, provided your bigger tools operate on 240-volt power, and you don't have multiple tools going at the same time.
10-gauge wire for up to 30 amps, or 40 amps if you are running intermittently loaded motors such as on a table saw or jointer that is not being used for big production jobs or jobs where you are doing a lot of continuous cutting. With intermittent loads, you can use 40-amp breakers, because a 40-amp breaker should not be loaded at more than 32 amps continuous. Just be aware that you will have more heating in the wire, so it be as open to ventilation as possible. It shouldn't be buried under the insulation in an attic, for example, between the breaker panel and the plug in the wall. 10-gauge wire is rarely used on 120-volt circuits.

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Marv wrote:

Why did you waste your time with that?
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fireant wrote: > Want to replace current 10' cord with 25' cord. > Is 14-3 large enough? > > Saw is 3 HP 220V. TIA, F
I'd buy a 25 ft, 10-2 /w/ ground molded cord set, chop off the receptacle, wire it into the saw, get a beer and admire your handy work.
What you save buying the molded cord set pays for the beer.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Well, 12 would likely suffice very nicely, but 10 is better of course from a heavy load viewpoint. Personally I'd probably just use a good extension cord; all that cord might not be necessary someday and then you'd be looking at cutting it off.
Pop`
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I'd go with 12-3. Some might recommend 10-3 but I don't believe it's necessary or even beneficial for that length of run. 12-3 will be quite a bit more manageable in size than 10-3. Just go buy an extension cord at the local BORG, and chop off the receptacle end, and wire that end into your saw.
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-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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Depends. If you are going to stay within the 25' then I'd go with 12 guage. The surge of a starting motor draws more then you think. 10 guage would be nice if you are even thinking of needing an extension cord. Either way, 14 guage is too small.
I know they wire houses with it, but 14 guage braided copper in a cord is just not as safe for long distances.
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3 hp equates out to about 15 amps at 220 volts. You will be pushing a 14 gauge cord. 12 gauge will do it just fine. 10 is over kill for 25 feet. Greg
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Greg O wrote:

At 220, that's only 7.5A per wire; NOT much of a problem. YOu're mostly right, but for the wrong reasons.
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You want to re-think that? I think you are mostly wrong! Where did the 7.5 amps per wire come from?? Keep in mind that I deal with 220 single phase, 208 and 480 three phase on a daily basis. I am sticking with my 20 gauge wire for the 25 foot run. Greg
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Greg O wrote:

Did you really mean to put 20 gage there?
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Damn it! 12 gauge! Typing faster than brain functions! Greg
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Greg O wrote:

Hmm, OK, I see what you're at. I assumed the OP was a North American residential, meaning opposing phases of the 110 make up the 220 and thus each hot carries half of the total current rating. In the UK and other places, their 240 is indeed going to carry all the current of the rating since there is only one "hot" conductor plus the neutral. But at the same time, 240 @ xx Amps, well, that's a different story. Since the OP stated 220 and 15A, which is how NA power is stated, I suspect he is in NA. But, your point is taken and valid if he's in a different country.
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wrote:

I thnk all of us assumed the same thing about the OP's location. You're just wrong about each leg carrying half the current, that's all.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I was assuming North America, and you are still wrong! Greg
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It would have been more polite to tell him _why_ he was wrong:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Split_phase>
scott
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says...

Wrong -- it's 15A per wire.

It's a *big* problem on 14ga wire.

Whereas you are entirely wrong, but for the wrong reasons.

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Doug Miller wrote:

110 with 15A in each phase would be a 30A ckt; 30A delivered to the load.

ThiMk!
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wrote:

Nope.
220V * 15A = 3300 W.
(110V * 7.5A) + (110V * 7.5A) = 825 W + 825 W = 1650 W.

Absolutely false. The currents are *not* additive. Two 110V circuits in series with 15A in each leg makes a 15A circuit at 220V. **NOT** a 30A circuit.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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= 15A.

Nope! Try again! These electrical questions that get answered by the cusless are fun!!! Greg
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