Walnut finishing products to fill pores?

Project is a small table top of walnut. First time to finish walnut. The test pieces look like they are full of pores when verathane is applied. Not smooth. The man at the paint store wanted to sell white filler. Doesn't seem right, but I don't know. Any suggestions appreciated. Scott
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ShakasCaregiver wrote:

Do you know what the "white filler" was? I use "FFFF" pumice along with shellac to fill walnut. By itself pumice is white. It turns translucent when applied with the shellac.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Jack, as an aside, what would happen if you used your filler on say oak and then stained the piece. Does it take the stain? Thanks, JG
Nova wrote:

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depends on the filler and depends on the look. filler that doesn't stain as well as the wood creates a grain highlight.
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JGS wrote:

I haven't tried using it on oak. If I were to use it I think I'd rub the shellac/pumice mixture into the pores and then sand the surface back to bare wood, leaving the filler in the pores, before staining.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Try this link, thanks to Charlie Self, the author:
http://shop.woodcraft.com/Woodcraft/assets/html/fillers.asp?mscssid !F24A90FB4C4DDB99D26EAB533CEAD2
Mike
p.s. don't buy anything from this shameless, corporate-minded beast of a company (at least not on the website hehe)

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You can keep adding coats of finish and cutting them back till the pores are filled level with the rest of the wood or use a pore filler. There are pore fillers that come in various colors but I like the Crystalac clear drying pore filler. It looks a bit like the glue you would find in a kindergarten but does dry clear.
One source would be McFeeley's. They do have an online site.
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I did just that on a small piece I made for xmas. It only took a couple of coats fo shelac to fill in all the pores. The nice thing about the clear shellac is that it doesn't NEED to take stain since it is basically clear.
I don't know what your top coat is going to be, but do a test on the back side to make sure it looks ok with the shellac only in the "pits" and grain area. On a light colored wood project I just finished I found I needed to put finish up with a 1 lbs cut of shellac as a cover coat before I finished with varnish. Without the thin covercoat the areas the shellac filled were a slightly different sheen.
Jim
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With Varathane I just wet sand afer each couple of coats. Just finished a walnut table with Varathane and it took 8 coats and there is no grain showing. I've done the same with lacquer. Another thing that worked well for me was with cracks and holes that I didn't see before the first coat. I've found that I can spot aply finish with a toothpick and dry it real fast with a head gun. I do this over and over until it builds up, then wait till it really dries and wet sand it flat.
mark

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Why would you want to conceal the grain of a walnut table?
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I believe he means he filled the open pores too concealed them.
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Mike G.
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Don't be too sure. Almost all of the trim and door in our 100+ year old house are made of walnut and many of them are painted. For the record the ugly lime green paint seems to stick the best...at least it resists the stripper the best.
jim
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Yeah, and it's probably lead based too . . .
Bill Ranck Blacksburg, Va.
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Mike G wrote:

I think "level" might be more in order here, unless I misunderstand the OP.
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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