Walnut and Glue

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rich wrote: ...

Quite possibly the key, particularly if it was cool as appears may have been from followup. TB III is slower-drying than either I or II which has advantages, but it does require longer before working. I guess I may have overlooked that detail in initial reading.
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Two good possibilities: the wood may be too wet, or resinous, and the glue isn't 'taking'. Or, your plane could need sharpening (the pressure on a plane blade can collapse the little cellulose tubes, and they won't wick up the glue if they're not open).
Scuff-sanding after flattening the wood will deal with possibility number two. Epoxy or polyurethane or hide glue might work better on resinous woods.
Lamination is in some senses an easier gluing task than making glue-up chunks, because of the large glue area.
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On Wed, 28 May 2008 15:37:56 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd

Howdy,
Could you say a bit more about that...?
It seems to me that the comment would make sense only for end grain, so I suspect I am missing something.
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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The runup to D-day saw a massive effort to glue up plywood into gliders, and the early batches didn't hold very well. The trouble was traced to the platen presses (that held the plies together to make loose bits into solid plywood).
(from _The New Science of Strong Materials_, J. E. Gordon) "... a proportion of aircraft plywood was ungluable. The joints in such plywood, made with all due care, looked like any other joints but had no strength..."
The effect is sometimes called case-hardening, and is due to microscopic damage that prevents the glue from penetrating into the wood to make contact with the subsurface (strong, intact) wood fibers.
Sandpaper is a good treatment for the problem.
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On Wed, 28 May 2008 18:19:12 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd

Howdy,
Thanks for that interesting comment...
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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