Wallace Shaper


My neighbor just gave me a Wallace shaper. Does anyone on here know anything about these. It seems to work fine.
Thanks, Dan
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Dan Kratville wrote:

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Like what do you want to know? Wallace was a manufacturer from roughly 1920 or so until sometime in the 40s (but I think they were gone by WWII). What machines I have seen have been decent, similar to Delta of the era.
You might look at Old Woodworking Machinery web site and see what Jeff has found to put up there...
www.owwm.com
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dpb wrote:

Thanks for the direction. I guess I am wondering if bits can be found for this machine. I also don't have any experience using shapers and was wondering if these work the same as newer models. In other words if I go on the Internet and learn how to use a modern shaper can I apply the same techniques to an older machine. It has a fence and basically looks like a giant router with a spindle sticking out of it. Thanks a lot for all of your help.
Dan
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Dan Kratville wrote:
> Thanks for the direction. I guess I am wondering if bits can be found > for this machine. I also don't have any experience using shapers and was > wondering if these work the same as newer models. <snip>
Whatever you do, remember one thing.
The nickname "widow maker" is well deserved.
Lew
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Dan Kratville wrote: ...

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Yes, although for shapers they're normally called "cutters", not "bits".
Assuming it is, in fact, a spindle shaper (flat table sorta' like a tablesaw, vertical spindle sticking up) then all you need is to determine what size shaft it has and there ya' go. I'm assuming at that age it is probably 3/4" spindle, but that would depend on how large a machine it actually is.
As for using it, yes, again assuming it is indeed a shaper, there really is very little difference in newer machines vis a vis the older ones.
Is the fence with it?
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dpb wrote:

Yes the fence is with it. I posted a picture of it on a.b.p.woodworking under Wallace shaper. The spindle is 3/8". The plaque on the side of the machine says the speed is 8500.
You guys are great, thanks! Dan
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Dan Kratville wrote:

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That's good (the fence, that is). Hopefully if is split so can adjust the two halves independently. W/ a starting pin and collars, one can do freehand shaping operations as well.
I've never seen a vertical shaper w/ 3/8" shaft--smallest I've ever run across is 1/2". I am virtually positive you will not find anybody making shaper cutters for spindles smaller than 1/2" currently (that's probably a lot of the reason the neighbor "donated" the machine to you... :) ). You will be able to use some small 1/2" cutters, but wouldn't want to try anything very large OD--horizontal panel raisers, for example, are out.
You will also probably have to either make yourself or have a machine shop make some "t" collars in order to use a half-inch cutter as I don't think there's a supplier for anything smaller than 3/4 to 1/2", either.
If, by any chance, the machine has an interchangeable shaft, I'd strongly recommend having a 1/2" shaft made for it. If not, at least you haven't invested a lot in it already. 8500 is pretty slow for a small diameter cutter as well, but w/ a 3/8" shaft you probably don't want to push the rpm up much, either.
As for the scaremongers regarding the danger--used properly, a shaper is no more dangerous than any other whirling piece of sharp high-speed steel. I have used one for nearly 40 years now almost exclusively freehand and never had an accident. Like all woodworking w/ power tools, it must be treated w/ respect and you have to think and operate safely at all times. Respect, not fear...
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dpb wrote:

Opps, I meant to say 5/8" spindle not 3/8", sometimes I can be a little dyslexic with the ruler. The fence is adjustable as you described. So if I find 5/8" cutters I should be ready to go?
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Dan Kratville wrote:

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Well, the standards are now 1/2, 3/4, 1, 1-1/4, and larger...
I think you're in the same boat except you'll have to buy 3/4" cutters and make or have made a set of reducing collars to use them on a 5/8" shaft.
A 5/8" shaft, however, will be plenty stout for most anything you're likely to want to do with it. The 8500 isn't bad for that size--most new shapers will be dual-speed w/ roughly 10k rpm for smaller diameter and somewhere in the 7500 range for large guys like panel raisers. You're sorta' in the middle. Large cutters will have max rpm specs but few for a 3/4" spindle will probably be less than that.
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dpb wrote:

OK Thanks for your help guys I will begin searching for the appropriate parts.
Dan
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Dan Kratville wrote:

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What, specifically are you wanting? As noted, there aren't going to be any parts for 5/8" shaper spindles--the beast you have is the only one I know of in existence... :)
While I'm sure there must be another one or two still around somewhere, there aren't enough for anybody to make cutters or even the collors for them as a production item.
3/4" cutters are quite easy to find...any of the better internet places will have a selection. Personally, I am partial to Amana as they are a finer carbide and honed to a better initial sharpness than virtually any other I have used. That comes at a price, however--they ain't cheapies. Whether they're worth the extra cost over Woodtek or some of the other imports depends on what level of work you intend to do and, in large part, on what kind of material you're going to use. If you're going to be using a softer, nicely working wood (say poplar for paing-grade moulding), the inexpensive ones will suffice although you may need some sanding. If, otoh, you're thinking of some neat mouldings for a grandfather clock case in a hard maple w/ it's maybe tricky grain, the sharper the better to avoid tearout, etc.
As for collars for reducing to a 5/8" shaft, I think your best hope will be a local machinist--maybe you could find a metalworking hobbyist/retired type who would swap some help--where I was before had several, but I don't have the luxury of having found that at present... :(
Good luck and let us know what you do (and eventually what you make)... :)
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LRod

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LRod wrote:

LOL, it appears I am dyslexic in more ways than just the ruler.
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On Thu, 27 Jul 2006 17:31:34 -0700, Dan Kratville

What is that group? DAM? Mothers Against Dyslexics?
Well, thanks for being good natured about it...
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LRod

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wrote:

I used to get in awful muddles with all those fractions of an inch, but since I switched to millimetres it's been plain sailing.
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Shapers should be taken very seriously. They can be both very handy and very dangerous at the same time. The cutters can be had from a number of sources. Shapers tend to be much more expensive to operate due to cutter cost.
A power feeder is "strongly" recommended for shaper operations, unless you have one of the fairly small table top versions.
http://www.owwm.com/MfgIndex/detail.asp?ID 9
Is this yours ??? http://www.owwm.com/PhotoIndex/detail.asp?idE13
Dan Kratville wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

I think that mine is a bit bigger than that one. I posted a picture on a.b.p.woodworking under Wallace shaper. Dan
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