wall building (2*4) question

hello,
This might be a stupid question, but when creating a 2*4 stud wall, how many nails are suposed to hold the 2*4 to the top or bottom plate? 1 or 2? is this in the code?
Second simple question: does any one knows the setback between a building (garage) and power and phone lines?
thanks, cyrille
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cyrille de brebisson wrote:

Two nails if nailing through the plate into the stud, three if toenailing. Fasteners should be 12s or above for through nailing and eights for toenailing (this may vary according to local building codes).
Setback between building and power lines? I don't understand that question. If there is a power line, then there is an easement. If there is an easement, then you can't build there. Stay out of the easements and you will be fine.
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Just as an addendum, use three nails through the plate if using 2x6 studs.

Actually, there are many code requirements for clearances to electrical wires.
Basically, the wire has to be more than 3 feet from any window, door, or the side of a deck or balcony (so you can't reach out and touch the wire).
The wire has to be more than 10 feet above a deck, balcony, or other area only accessable to pedestrians (so you can't reach up and touch the wire).
The wire has to 12 feet above a driveway, yard, etc., but has to be 18 feet above a roadway.
The wire has to be more than 22 feet above a swimming pool.
The wire has to be more than 8 feet above a roof that is less than 4/12 pitch, but only needs to be 3 feet above a roof that is 4/12 pitch or greater. There is an exception that allows you to go as far as 4 feet horizontally over an eave, as close as 18" to the roof. This basically just allows for an incoming overhead service feed.
Of course, your local electric utility may have different requirements than the standard codes spell out. You may want to call them and check if the wire proximity is going to be an issue.
On the other hand, if this is new wiring, just go underground. It's out of sight, won't be affected by weather or falling trees, and no risk of accidently touching it with ladders or kites.
Anthony
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HerHusband wrote:

I thought he was talking about power lines. He didn't say anything about a drop. Do they allow you to build in power line easements in your area?
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"Robert Allison" wrote

LOL He also didn't say anything about 2 x 6's ... around here you sometime you get more answer than question. ;)
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I just thought I'd mention it in case the original poster decides to upgrade to 2x6 studs like we did on our garage. Gotta be thorough. :)
Anthony
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I suspect he was using the term loosely and not suggesting he was going to build on the easement.
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Robert,

Yes, we're both speaking about power lines.
Around here anyway, it wouldn't really be considered an easement if say a powerline comes from a pole at the road overhead to the roof of the house. If I wanted to build a shed or other building between the power pole and the house, I shouldn't have any problems as long as the distances I mentioned are observed. Of course, it would always be wise to contact the power company before you start building just to see if they have their own requirements.
What would be considered an easement is where the powerlines and other utilities run along the road. But that's usually built-in to the zoning setbacks anyway.
Again, the wisest thing is to check with the building department and electric utility. They will have more appropriate advice than anything I have to say.
Anthony
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hello,
Thanks for all the answers... but as always, answers do bring more questions :-(
- for the toe nailed nails... the answer was 3 naisl. I assume that this means 2 nails on one side and 1 on the other? am I correct?
- for the easements now: is there a difference between Power cables (ie: electricity) and phone/cable lines?
Right now, the plans call for a phone cable 10'10" away from the roof (at a 9.8/12 pitch), but I would like to put some dormers which would bring the cable around 5 feet ways from the window.... (but still above them)...
regards, cyrille

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One on each side, and one on the end. If you've got the space, you might put one more "naisl" in.

That's something your local utility/buildings department would have to answer. Access to the lines is a major concern no matter if it's phone or power. This is true for both stopping someone from "playing squirrel" or allowing someone to actually work on them.

Puckdropper
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To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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I don't know if it varies by region, but we don't have specific power or phone easements. They're simply referred to as utility easements. They're free to run power, phone, cable TV, etc.

I'm not aware of any restrictions for phone cables, as they are generally low voltage anyway. I wouldn't want to stick one in my mouth, but if you accidently grab the phone wire you're unlikely to be harmed. The biggest side effect would be loss of your phone service.
But again, call the phone company if you have concerns.
Anthony
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You keep mixing terms here. An easement is a right of way that the power company, or phone company, etc. has on your property. Typically by the road, but not always. Clearances to the house are a different thing. You need to use the appropriate term to avoid confusion.
You need to check with your local authorities regarding clearances. This stuff varies by locale. Your power company will provide you with specs for their lines. Your local building inspector can probably provide you with comprehensive specs.
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"Mike Marlow" wrote

Probably a legal difference in different parts of the country, but around here a "right of way" is a specific type of "easement".
Sorry, Mike ... seems the temptation for nits to get picked around here is irresistible. Beside, the devil made me do it! :)
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"cyrille de brebisson" wrote in message

What Robert said ... but it is also important to check for building height restrictions next to power line easements, as well as possible encroachment of eaves and overhangs. Best to check with your local building services department.
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Not just height restrictions next to a power line, but height restrictions within zoning requirements. A friend of mine had to get a variance just to add one foot of height to his garage so he could jack it up and put a short concrete wall under it. If you are in an area where you even have to ask the question, better to check with the building department now than to have to tear it down later.
Pete Stanaitis ------------------------ <snip>

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