Walking

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I was bedridden for 6 or so weeks around same age. No box at my feet. Achilles tendon shrunk, and I couldn't walk right away either ...
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Best regards
Han
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Keep at it, CW! Sounds like you're determined, and progressing well.
I can only imagine what that first step felt like. Must have been quite the event!
Congratulations on this major milestone!
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On 8/1/2012 5:55 PM, CW wrote:

Progress! And yes, a big deal.
I'm so badly out of shape though that I

I had an entirely different situation that also made the smallest exertion a major undertaking, for a long while. I found that each improvement seemed to come before I noticed it directly. Rather than a deliberate "test" like walking around the block, I'd forget my glasses upstairs and climb the steps to get them. I'd come back down to the computer and only later realize, "hey, I just climbed the steps, almost normally".
Each accomplishment is another milepost on the road to better things. And by all means take encouragement wherever you find it. People, most people anyway, are happy to provide it, even people you only "know" online. A number of folks on a piano discussion board were very supportive when I was on the mend, people I have never met. Think of the lone asshole here as useful contrast; put there to make the good wishes of the rest stand out in greater relief.
All the best.
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On 8/1/2012 4:55 PM, CW wrote:

So I am curious, did you have a procedure done at all?
FWIW a neighbor just had her knee replace a couple of months ago, I think she is about 50ish.
She was walking "2" days after the surgery, on pain med of course but today about 8 weeks later she is riding a bicycle again, several miles a day.
From what I hear the secret to a quick recovery is for you to wake up from surgery with a peddling machine working that leg. Another friend in her 70's woke up that way and recovery was quick.
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wrote:

I've been told basically the same thing. Get right in to the PT and work as hard as you can. It does promote faster and stronger recovery. I shattered both femurs and todays after surgery they started PT. God do I remember knocking heads with nurse Ratchet.
Mike M
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I understand the knee surgery is pending.

Once a prothesis is put in, it's ready to go, period. The only thing preventing the patient from getting up and going is the soft tissue that has been "damaged" by the surgery. It takes 21 days for that type of wound to fully heal. Similar with hip replacement.
There are range on motion machines to assist the patient to get going right after surgery. Depending on the patient's problems, some can get up and start walking, immediatley, and some can not. The machines slowly increase the range of motion the knee will flex, i.e., say 10 the first day, 20 the second day, etc., until relative full range of motion is achieved. Often times, during this machine course, the patient will be motived to not use the machine and eagerly do the workouts on their own.... some folks can tolerate this type of "self induced" pain/slight pain better than others.
There are several reasons why one needs to get moving as soon as possible after surgery. A few: 1) The longer one waits, the more scar tissue will develope, such that range of motion may become restricted... and sometimes restricted to the point of the knee becoming stiff. Scar tissue can form so bad and so fast, it will "lock" the knee, preventing movement or it hurts enough that the patient doesn't want to do the exercise on their own. Some patients are less active and sometimes it's hard to get them going, then they develope a stiff knee. In bad cases, as this, we've had to put the patient to sleep and manually/forcefully yank/flex the knee, literally ripping the scar tissue apart, in order to free up the joint. 2) The sooner a patient sees improvement, usually they are motivated to keep going and more so on their own 3) The patient needs to maintain the tone and strength of their leg muscles. The muscles around the knee provide lots of support for the knee joint. It's not just the ligaments and connective tissues that provide support for the knee. 4) Movement helps the body remove any potential for blood clotting, even slight clotting, hence further enhancing and speeding healing and recovery. Movement keeps the blood vessels open and functioning properly. Movement (flexing and contracting of muscles) acts like a pump to keep the flow of blood going, especially through the veins. The veins carry blood not only back to the heart, but to the kidneys and lymph system, for cleaning/filtering and/or removing any "trash" in the system. The cleaner the blood, the better it can absorb oxygen from the lungs. 5) Good steady improving movement equates to the patient progressing nicely. If there is evidence of some halting or sporadic movement (other than complaint of pain), i.e., (subjective observations) in routines/regimine/schedule, then there may be a reason to monitor for infection, which would be a sign of some interference with a normal improvement schedule.
Sonny
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On 8/3/2012 4:22 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

is about 50ish. She was walking "2" days after the surgery, on pain med of course but today about 8 weeks later she is riding a bicycle again, several miles a day. From what I hear the secret to a quick recovery is for you to wake up from surgery with a peddling machine working that leg. Another friend in her 70's woke up that way and recovery was quick.

preventing the patient from getting up and going is the soft tissue that has been "damaged" by the surgery. It takes 21 days for that type of wound to fully heal. Similar with hip replacement.

after surgery. Depending on the patient's problems, some can get up and start walking, immediatley, and some can not. The machines slowly increase the range of motion the knee will flex, i.e., say 10 the first day, 20 the second day, etc., until relative full range of motion is achieved. Often times, during this machine course, the patient will be motived to not use the machine and eagerly do the workouts on their own.... some folks can tolerate this type of "self induced" pain/slight pain better than others.

of motion may become restricted... and sometimes restricted to the point of the knee becoming stiff. Scar tissue can form so bad and so fast, it will "lock" the knee, preventing movement or it hurts enough that the patient doesn't want to do the exercise on their own. Some patients are less active and sometimes it's hard to get them going, then they develope a stiff knee. In bad cases, as this, we've had to put the patient to sleep and manually/forcefully yank/flex the knee, literally ripping the scar tissue apart, in order to free up the joint.

The muscles around the knee provide lots of support for the knee joint. It's not just the ligaments and connective tissues that provide support for the knee.

slight clotting, hence further enhancing and speeding healing and recovery. Movement keeps the blood vessels open and functioning properly. Movement (flexing and contracting of muscles) acts like a pump to keep the flow of blood going, especially through the veins. The veins carry blood not only back to the heart, but to the kidneys and lymph system, for cleaning/filtering and/or removing any "trash" in the system. The cleaner the blood, the better it can absorb oxygen from the lungs.

If there is evidence of some halting or sporadic movement (other than complaint of pain), i.e., (subjective observations) in routines/regimine/schedule, then there may be a reason to monitor for infection, which would be a sign of some interference with a normal improvement schedule.

And there is,
5. Insurance insists you free up that bed. ;`)
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"CW" wrote in message
I am going out for a walk. No big deal to most but I spent the last year in a wheel chair. In the last month, I have progressed from the chair to a walker and now just a cane. I'm so badly out of shape though that I can only make it about a block before I have to rest. Oddly enough, I have to constantly remind myself how to walk. You wouldn't think you forget but apparently I did. My knee is still bone on bone. My doctor seems to think I am to young for a knee replacement. He said to give it a while and see if the pain goes away. I'll see how it goes. Airports should be fun. I have a steel plate and 15 screws in my lower leg. =============================================================================Thanks to everyone for the well wishes, encouragement, and advice. You guys have given me a lot of good info and helped me make decisions on dealing with my condition. Thank you all. I very much appreciate it.
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