Wainscoting Question

Im putting in wainscoting in my second bathroom. Is there a problem with just nailing the wainscoting at the top and bottom (in the studs) where the molding will cover. It seems to be very sturdy.
Thanks, Phillip
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On 2 Feb 2004 21:23:02 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Phillip) wrote:

that should be enough, depending on length and straightness. if it's tongue and groove or shiplap you can sneak a nail or two through the hidden part of the tongue.
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I would put a nail on stud layout in the center as well. If you are painting the wainscotting, it will never show. If you are using a stained or natural wainscot, use colored putty to hide the nail hole. SH
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In rec.woodworking snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Phillip) wrote:

Get some tubes of construction adhesive. It is always recommended for that anyway.
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On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 00:48:26 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Bruce) wrote:

If it's WOOD wainscotting, nailing it to embedded boards, leaving some of the wainscotting the opportunity to float, will ensure a long lasting job. Gluing solid wood wainscotting to drywall can be asking for trouble in some climates.
MDF wainscotting is easy to glue, as it doesn't have the movement of wood.
Barry
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In rec.woodworking

Barry
Good point Barry, I didn't even think of wood as my experience is with either plywood types or mdf types.
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Phillip wrote:

Why not consider using 1/2" fir ply (go to hell looking stuff) on the wall as a substrate. Cover that with your finish (good) wood and cap off the top edge with a molding(s). This way you will have good and continuous grounds for your nails. The plywood can be put up with screws into each stud and "stitch" nailed at the areas between the studs.
"Stitch" nailing - When nailing into drywall there are times when placing two nails close together (1/2" - 1") and crossing them (making an X) is enough to hold the piece to the wall.
UA100
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One of the problems associated with doing that is if you have any power recepticles, light switches, or toilet paper dispenser or whatever in the wall, you have to *remodel* those as well. Kind of a pita although entirely possible. Another potential problem is if you have enough room behind the toilet to accomodate the plywood. Just food for thought. SH
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Slowhand wrote:

Yes the toilet might/could be a problem but you only need box extensions for electrical receptacles.
Alternately, you could cut away the drywall from the (insert height here) line down and go right up to the studs. It's messy but doable by anyone with some smarts.
UA100
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wrote:

Right on.
A great way to use the plywood is in wide strips, replacing the drywall. The outlets can be left alone, continuous wide strips can be placed above the outlets to Unisaw's line, with another running slightly below the outlets to the floor.
This makes it really easy to find convenient nailing locations. The drywall is easily removed with a Roto-Zip or small circular saw set to the correct depth, as well as the old standby utility knife.
Barry
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That could be an advantage as well. Change things and/or take a look at what is going on inside the walls.
I know I'd like to redo the light switch, replace the duplex and add another in the loo I use, but alas, the walls are tile, so it'll have to be put at the far end of a list of things that SWMBO orders/agrees to.

I guess I've done a lot of it, so its pretty easy for me.

True, but he's only talking substrate. The OP is going to have to get his paneling back there anyway and having a decent substrate will make that easier.
Additionally, a bathroom is a tough place for paneling to survive in. Personally, I wouldn't want it, but if i did I wouldn't want it glued to drywall, which itself has problems enduring in a bathroom environment...
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