Waaaay OT: Question about seasoning Cast Iron

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Bought a chicken-frying skillet today made of cast iron. I'm nothing you would even think of being associated with anything associated with metallurgy, but I would guess that the cast iron in my skillet is iron and 3-4% carbon.
Here's my question: Can I or should I try to smooth out the inside of that skillet in order to help it get that well-seasoned black-iron slick? My understanding of the seasoning process is that over a number of uses, the high spots on the iron get worn down, and the low spots get filled with, well, food. When the high and low spots even out, that's when the iron cookware gets that dull shine and non-stick surface that your grandma told you about.
So what if I jump-start the process? By taking off the high spots first thing (say, sanding to 400-grit) and leaving the low spots much less low to fill in much more quickly, it is my hypothesis that my new chicken-frying cast iron skillet will "season" much more quickly.
What say you?
-Phil Crow
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:
> Bought a chicken-frying skillet today made of cast iron.
Congratulations, now you will be able to properly fry chicken.
(They will pry mine from my cold dead hand)<G>.
> Here's my question: Can I or should I try to smooth out the inside of > that skillet in order to help it get that well-seasoned black-iron > slick?
I didn't bother, but did reseason many times the first couple of years.
Even today I scrub mine out with a ScotchBrite pad and reoil, removing excess oil with a paper towel before putting it away.
Lew
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What`s that have to do with woodworking.......
wrote:

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Nothing. Note the OT in the subject line.

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George Berlinger wrote:
> What`s that have to do with woodworking.......
The subject clearly indicates an off topic post.
Take your meds and bet a good boy.
Lew
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If you want to do good woodwork, start the day with a good breakfast of bacon and eggs cooked in a CI pan.
Later, while you are doing woodwork in the shop, you can have a roast or meatloaf in the CI pan cooking in the oven. Put cut up potatoes in the same pan around the roast. Very efficient way to cook, leaving more time for the woodworking.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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Hey Ed... do you cut the potatoes on the CMS or the band saw?
What angle is best for proper browning and getting them done all the way through?
I used a sawzall at 22 degrees last time and wasn't happy with the results at all...
Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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Dunno about Ed but I once cut a frozen turkey in half on my bandsaw. Worked perfectly - tasted fine with a hint of WD-40 though. Spouse thought I was crazy - maybe that's why I am now single.
:)
Vic
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Yeah. Got any FREE PLANS for a dinner potatoe?
-Zz
On Mon, 20 Mar 2006 07:50:57 -0800, mac davis

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*roflmao* that was great... worth having to clean coffee off the monitor..

Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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You can use wooden spatulas to stir the food.
wrote:

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Oddly, I did just that for a buddy of mine. He was actually very pleased with the results, and he is no slouch in the kitchen.
I used an ROS and it was actually pretty slow going.
Go for it.

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

When I had several new cast iron items to season, I found a website somewhere that recommended that very approach. I tried it, and was very glad I had power tools to use as it was very slow going. I don't know how long it would have taken to season properly without sanding first, but it seemed to work well enough.
DonkeyHody
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I believe I would just fry up a few greasy hamburgers and then overheat the remaining juice a bit. Do the same thing next time, and pretty soon you'll have that surface that you're looking for. Might smoke a bit in the house, though.
--
Gary Brady
Austin, TX
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I'd say that 400 grit would take forever, maybe longer. Use a carborundum stone.
R
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Spray it with TopCote and it will not rust and the food will not stick. ;~)

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>Here's my question: Can I or should I try to smooth out the inside of >that skillet in order to help it get that well-seasoned black-iron >slick?
I've never done anything other than extensive seasoning; however, if you want to try it, would suggest a small right angle grinder equipped with a mediun wire cupped wheel brush.
Easiest way to get into all the corners.
Lew
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Don't waste time grinding it away.
Coat it in a fatty oil like olive oil, and throw it in the oven at like 400 until it stops smoking. Coat it again and repeat. The first coatins will be orange or yellow colored. Olive oil seasons a skillet better than vegetable oil.
It will quickly turn black with use. Bacon or eggs are good things to start with. Scrabled eggs will not stick to anything inside a lightly oiled and seasoned skillet.
In rec.crafts.metalworking snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Cydrome Leader wrote:

Just keep the amount of oil to minimum. Otherwise opening the oven might produce an impressive fireball.
--

FF


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On 19 Mar 2006 17:38:32 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

good point, Fred! (occupational thing? )
a little saying that I try to keep running through my mind on things like that is "no drama, no trauma".. Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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