Visio templates for shop layout

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Hello all, if anyone is interested in a (free) Visio stencil for designing a woodworking shop, I have created one and posted it at http://home.comcast.net/~hchute/woodshop_visio.htm
Thanks for all the design ideas from this discussion group.
- Harvey
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Harvey Chute) wrote in

Thanks for the template and the link. I'm working on a new shop plan and your template will be very useful.
LD
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On 23 Jun 2004 16:07:21 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Harvey Chute) wrote:

This is sooo cool. Bravo! I haven't opened it in Visio yet, but your webpage alone makes me confident it'll work great. I don't even need to do a new layout for some time but knowing this exists is an inspiration. Well done.
I've always struggled with Visio -- only got it because a consultant did flow charts with it and I wanted to be able to edit them One of the frustrations with it is that it clearly is still designed for a longstanding installed base going back to V1.0 Commands are not at all intuitive, IMO. For example: Why are they called "stencils"? IIRC, they are listed under File, not Edit. Why? Wahts' worse, IMO: If you did not know they are called stencils, see if you could find anything about such "thingies" in Help. I couldn't!!! (Of course, there is the infinitesimally small possibility that it's just me.)
Anyway, again, great job. -- Igor
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(Harvey Chute)

The 'Stencils' thing is because you used to be able to buy plastic stencils with cut out shapes for flowcharting, drafting, etc. Looked just like the Visio stencils, including the color. I think they still sell them in office supply places. IIRC, I saw some at Staples.
LD
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On Thu, 24 Jun 2004 00:51:56 GMT, Lobby Dosser

That makes sense. Just seems to me (rant) that if MS wants new customers they should consider that people may not get that connection - at least not retrospectively. FWIW. Again, great job.
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no snipped-for-privacy@sprynet.com says...

I've still got some of the flowcharting templates - not only for computers but for punched card machines - and a "slide rule" for determining throughput on those old machines :-).
It's fun to notice them occasionally and reflect on how much things have changed in 50 years :-).
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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wrote:

My first remote terminal connected at 150 baud (or was it 75?) and the memory device was paper tape.
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says...

You had terminals? I keyed the stuff in on the front panel!
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On Fri, 25 Jun 2004 02:35:43 GMT, Lobby Dosser

Plugboards....
George Shouse http://www.shouses.com ----------------------------------------------------- Always a fan of the World Champion Los Angeles Lakers It must be a Purple and Gold thing. Thanks for honoring the Original Lakers http://www.shouses.com ASBNLL FAQs at http://www.asbnll.com /
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says...

Where you had to jump up and down on the wires to get the board to fit, or to get that last wire from one corner to the other?

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snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net says...

We once had to wire an IBM407 plugboard to print a list of missing check numbers. Sort the cardstock checks, run them through and print the check numbers that weren't there.
I think the boss was joking, but we (myself and one other) actually managed to get one to work - but only on one particular machine. It was definitely a thicket of wires - even after we converted to permanent wires.
Then the CE pulled maintenance and our board didn't work anymore. We called him back and he said "well, the timing was a little off". We yelled "put it back!".
For as long as I worked there, the board had a sign that said it only worked on that machine, and the machine had two signs - one outside and one inside - that threatened sudden death to any CE that adjusted the timing :-).
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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It was most likely 110 baud, same speed as the teletype machines.
Dave "been there, done that" Hinz
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That does sound vaguely familiar, but my recollection is that everything was a multiple of 75 -- 75, 150, 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600. So, I won't bet on it, but I'm sticking with my first answer, Regis.
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no snipped-for-privacy@sprynet.com says...

You're pretty much right, but IIRC there was a 110 baud early on.
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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You mean, "turbo" 75 baud... :-)
--
Regards,

Rick

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If it was a _real_ teletype -- using 5-bit Baudot code -- it may have been even slower than that. The _fast_ machines, ie. 60WPM ones, were about 50 baud. I don't remember what the nominal baud rate was for a 45WPM TTY. Relatively late in history came the 100WPM machines, which were nominal 75 baud. Not too long after those were deployed, ASCII began to make major inroads. It was 'logically' about the same speed -- 110 baud ASCII is equivalent to 100WPM -- but the advantages of upper/lower case, and the elimination of LTRS/FIGS shift codes was compelling.
If it was using ASCII, it was probably 110 baud. 10CPS. About the only things that ran at 150 baud were some early 'daisy-wheel' based terminals, and Selectric(TM)-typewriter based units. Selectric hardware maxed out at 150WPM (150 baud); most daisy-wheels were good to 30CPS.
I take that back, a Frieden Flex-o-writer may have been good to 150 baud. Those were _great_ fun to play with, particularly if you had the unit with *dual* paper-tape readers, including the random-access 'search' function on the second tape drive.
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In article
snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com says...

We had one of those (w/o the search) as a console to a Readix computer. It used to freeze up, but if you lifted it an inch or two and dropped it, it started right back up. Considering that the computer power supply had an "X" marked on the side where we had to kick to free a stuck relay, the Flexowritr fit right in :-).
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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no snipped-for-privacy@sprynet.com says...

But did the paper tape punch use ghost code? And can you still wind a "bow tie"?
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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wrote:

You got me on those.
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no snipped-for-privacy@sprynet.com says...

When you ran paper tape in via an ASR33 teletype, it printed everything on the tape. Since this was usually binary programs, you got a lot of junk printed, and a hole in the right hand position unless you manually returned the carriage ever so often. "Ghost code" tape only used 4 of the 8 positions and so didn't print anything. Of course it cut the speed in half too :-).
When paper tape came out of the punch, you grabbed the beginning and wound the tape around your fingers in a figure 8 pattern. The result looked like a bow tie. The reason we did it that way was that you could then feed it into the reader and it neatly unwound from the center of the bow tie.
The alternate was to spool it all into a wastebasket and wind it up when it was done so the beginning was on the outside. But then you had to mount it on an axle to feed it without twisting.
It's amazing what useless data our brains retain :-).
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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