vises

I just posted a thread called "vices" (misspelled) to r.b.p.w that has a picture containing at least 5 vises.
I would appreciate if you may be able to identify them or comment on whether they may be worth owning or not. To this point, I have been considering Rockler's 9" quick-release vise for a front vise.
Thank you, Bill
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school the vises on the work benches having a wooden handle and something like a 1/8 turn counter clockwise would release tension and allow forward and backward movement without turning the handle. Closing the vise against an object and turning the handle clockwise would reengage the handle and the handle would again tighten. The vise also had a dog that would slide up. That is what I would like to have now.
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I used to use one quick-release vises too--at "The Boys Club of America", now called "The Boys and Girls Club of America" and briefly in high school. Seems like they were at least 10" wide, maybe more. I remember getting pinched by the wooden handle more than once.
While, we are on the topic of vises--does it matter much what sort of wood one uses for the jaw clamps? It seems like if one uses hard maple, then it may be more likely to "dent" the work than a less dense wood. Anything to this?
Bill
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If what you are clamping is not in there flat against the jaws you could dent most anything regardless of the wood used for the faces of the vise. As long as the jaws close correctly and you don't go Hercules with the vice a hard wood should not be a threat... A vise does not need to be terribly tight to be effective.
To demonstrate that point, check this vise out and the lack of cranking the clamp to get a firm grip. Scroll down to the bottom of the page for the video... Very cool
http://benchcrafted.com/vises-glide.htm
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Thanks. Yes, I've seen his videos before.... smooooothe...
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wrote:

Neat video. Although, considering the type of vise the video was promoting, it probably would have been prudent for them to remove the iron, Record type vise in the background.
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All of this thinking about vises has made me better appreciate how I better darn-well plan how the undercarriage of the vise does not interfere with the supporting structure of the workbench!
Thinking in terms of a "traditional woodworking workbench", up to this point in my mind I was thinking that the front vise would sort of be in front of the front leg of the bench... Oops! At least I haven't cut any wood yet. I guess as long as the end of the bench overhangs the supporting structure by 18 inches or so I'll be okay, but it changes the picture I had in my minds eye... Attaching the front vise further from the end would seem to reduce "racking".
Somehow I found my way to lumberjocks.com and found a lot of nice pictures of projects there too. Anyone here signed up over there?
Best, Bill
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I have a 10" Record vice on my bench. It is mounted outboard of the left leg but hard up against it. It is fitted so that the rear jaw is under the main top, which is 30mm thick, sufficient that 10mm of hardwood fitted as the rear cheek, is then flush with the front edge of the top. This gives an effective depth, above the the screw, of 130mm. Maximum opening is 355mm or about 14" The bench top extends to 25mm beyond the steelwork of the vice but the hardwood cheeks match the top. This facilitates the clamping of something which might be "L" shaped.
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wrote:

The Rockler 9" looks similar to my Record (Made in England). These vises are heavy so think about how it will be mounted. Avoid cast parts made in China. Where the Rockler vise is made?
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IIRC, the Rockler I mentioned had 3 bolts supporting it from the bottom (going up through the top), it seems like there might be something through the rear jaw too. I'm planning 3" thick SYP, and the vise maximum is 2.75" so I'll be doing some routing to make room for it. Not sure how heavy it will be (7' by 30" or so, 3" thick). May need to create some sort of support to hold it on the DP to drill peg holes.
Bill
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Just making a guess, I'd guess the Rockler's vises are made in China (but that's just speculation).
I learned today that Record vises are BLUE (and for some reason, I was hoping that these were of that brand). But all of these vises are GREEN (see the pic in the new vices thread I posted yesterday to r.b.p.w). Does that give any clues as to brand (so I can start doing my homework now)? I'll go take a look first-hand next week.
Bill
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After examining the picture I posted a little more, I noticed that most of them appear to have "8/6" embossed on them--meaning 8" wide and 6" high, I think. Typical woodworking vises seems to be more along the lines of 3.5" high. 8/6 seems to be a non-standard size. Perhaps they are for a really big bench. I'll probably go take a look, but my excitement about it has waned. Rockler's quick-release vises seem to get good reviews, new Jorgensens less so.
Bill
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