Vise jaw problem?

Hi guys,
I just screwed up and I am kind of ticked off. What a moron I am and I don't even know how I made the mistake. I bought a large front vise from Lee Valley to put on my workbench. I cut the front and rear jaws, I used the template that came with the vise to bore all my holes for the guide rods etc and I go to put it on my workbench and my holes are drilled in the wrong place........arrrrgh. I am now short about 1/4" on the top edge of both my jaws so they are not flush with the top of my bench. Does anyone see any reason why I couldn't laminate a 1/4" edge to the top edge of both jaws or would that create a weak spot? It would be a shame to start all over since it was the nicest pieces of birch I could find in my shop. Regards. -Guy
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Guy,
You didn't say how thick those jaws were but consider using some dowels to add some strength to this pieces you add. You could also cut a M&T joint along the top edges then glue the top pieces on. The M&T joint will give it strength. May even want to turn that mistake into an enhancement by using a contrasting hardwood.
Bob S.

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etc
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Bob,
The rear jaw is 1.5" thick and the front jaw is 3" thick. I don't know how useful dowels would be since the piece I would laminate on top would only be about 3/8" thick at most to bring the jaw flush with the bench top. Regards. -Guy

my
or
since
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be
No matter the thickness ( 1/4", 3/8", whatever ), I agree that the dowels (or M&T) will add to the shear strength of the jaw caps. If you should have the need to clamp just the bottom 1/4" of a workpiece at the top of your vise, this strength may be appreciated.
/rick.
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On Tue, 10 Aug 2004 00:43:00 -0400, RickS wrote:

With that much thickness, the OP has the opportunity to make an awesome dog. Just use hefty dowels. Lift the outer jaw on its pegs, and voila, full-width dog. Nice.
Although the sliding dovetail suggestion sounds elegant...
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How about a sliding dovetail?
Kevin
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"Guy LaRochelle" < snipped-for-privacy@sasktel.net> wrote in message
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You'd be gluing long grain to long grain, it should be plenty strong. I don't think you'll have a problem.
On Mon, 9 Aug 2004 18:09:40 -0600, "Guy LaRochelle"

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We're talking vise jaws here? Ain't necessary that this be art work. Nice if it can be. I'd start over from scratch and try to get the best vise jaws. To hell with what they look like. OMO
bob g.
Guy LaRochelle wrote:

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Bob,
Yes, I realize what you are saying that pretty vise jaws are not necessary. But the question here is do you think that laminating a 3/8" thick piece on the top edge of each jaw decrease their capabilites or weaken them? Regards. -Guy

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You're right, my short response didn't address your question but I think the multi part jaws probably won't be as strong as one piece.
bob g.
Guy LaRochelle wrote:

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On Mon, 9 Aug 2004 18:09:40 -0600, "Guy LaRochelle"

make that 1/4" piece out of the hardest, darkesd wood you can find, and it'll be a "feature"...
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Glue a strip on there! There should be no problem. With work that is clamped by the jaws, it will likely be clamped deeper than the band on the top (which will be plenty strong IMO). If you are using dogs, the strip on the top will have little effect.
David
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don't even know how I made the mistake. I bought a large front vise from Lee Valley to put on my workbench. I cut the front and rear jaws, I used the template that came with the vise to bore all my holes for the guide rods etc and I go to put it on my workbench and my holes are drilled in the wrong place........arrrrgh. I am now short about 1/4" on the top edge of both my jaws so they are not flush with the top of my bench. Does anyone see any reason why I couldn't laminate a 1/4" edge to the top edge of both jaws or would that create a weak spot? It would be a shame to start all over since it was the nicest pieces of birch I could find in my shop. Regards. -Guy
* * * Actually, strength does not enter into it, or you'd be using a metal vise. The purpose of such a vise is to hold wooden objects securely without damaging the wood. Therefore, what is important is not to use a different wood than for the rest of the vise, so as to have a surface of uniform hardness. Almost certainly looks are more important here than strength.
Worst case scenario (glue lines letting go) you'd have to do it over again. PvR
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On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 20:19:39 +0200, "P van Rijckevorsel"

I wish I had a better idea what went wrong with your setup (There's a dozen ways to mount any vise to any bench). I mortised my bench top to receive the metal jaw, used ply spacers, and fixed two oak face cheeks to the metal jaws. The oak cheeks are larger than the metal jaws. I used oak because that's the hardwood I found laying around the shop. My vise is large and heavy (Record #53E) and the biggest concern is this monster ever dropping on my toe. I used the biggest, baddest four bolts I could possibly use. It has proved exceptionally functional for 12 years, and probably many more to come.
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On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 18:50:40 +0000, Phisherman wrote:

I used oak for the same reason. Never again. Splinters under pressure. When I replace the jaws, soon, I'll use a more suitable wood.
Another thought just occurred: What about cutting the jaws so the grain is vertical? Seems that would help prevent the splintering along the top. Oversize jaw liners would have to be laminated, of course.
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