Very cool, but expensive...

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On 10/28/2015 10:47 AM, John McCoy wrote:

You may be right but to dismiss it without first hand knowledge is a bit harsh. New does not mean better but I can see where a hidden fastener may be a nice touch in some places. I'll keep an open mind until I see it.
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Well, I don't know I'm dismissing it. "Why" is an honest question. I don't see a reason to use it, but I'm open to being convinced there is one for that purpose (altho, in fairness to me, no-one has yet suggested one).
John
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snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com says...

It looks like the benefit is that one can make knock-down furniture with hidden fasteners. Why you would want to do this with a bannister though is a mystery.
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On 10/30/2015 7:46 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

I'd not use it for knock down furniture.In that case, no tool use would be a plus. As for the bannister, if I was building a high end house I'd use it. Details like that make a high end house just that.
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says...

But "no tool use" means exposed fasteners.

You'd use a screwed-together butt joint on a bannister in a "high end house"?!?!?!?!?!
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On 10/31/2015 3:27 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

Needing a special tool makes it non-knock down in many cases. Do you give your kids a drill when they are off to college?

would look good. Never used one so I can't say for sure.
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On Saturday, October 31, 2015 at 7:49:27 AM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Actually, yes.
I built a knockdown platform bed for my daughter. She wanted a full size bed, tall enough to fit storage bins underneath. The frame knocks down to 5 pieces which easily fit in the back of her car. The platform was cut in half.
I spent less than $20 for a HF cordless drill and gave her one of my quick clamps. Besides the initial assembly when she first took it back to school, she's moved the bed twice since I built it.
http://s440.photobucket.com/user/DerbyDad03/library/Platform%20Bed?sort=2&page=1
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says...

Well if you need it to be knock down in those cases obviously this is not the fastener to use. It seems inconcievable to you that there might be a use for knock-down furniture other than sending a kid off to college.

Why would a bannister need to be removable?
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On 10/31/2015 7:49 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

I used one example but that does not mean I don't know of others. Temporary store displays, trade show booth and two more of many examples that I can conceive.

Were did I say removable? Oh, I didn't, but you like to argue for the sake of arguing so you add in your own ideas. I only said hidden fastener. OK, you can finish with a snarky comment.
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I think J. Clarke is stuck on the same point I am here. The video referenced way up thread shows a bannister made with these fancy fastners. And the question is why? It's been suggested (maybe not by you) that the advantage of these things is that they're removable. So that raises the question, why you would want to remove a bannister?
And if you don't want to remove the bannister, we're back to why use those fastners in the first place?
John
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On 11/1/2015 10:10 AM, John McCoy wrote:

The main advantage I see is that the fasteners are hidden. Needing to remove a bannister is rare, but could be handy at times moving furniture but I don't see that as a big selling point.
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says...

Dowels are hidden too, and a lot cheaper, so what do these things bring to the table that dowels don't, if you're not planning on removing the thing?
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On 11/1/2015 6:12 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

[snip]

I don't wish to prolong the agony but...
Have you ever attempted to remove/separate a PROPERLY glued and doweled joint? If you have, then you might understand where this device - admittedly of limited, specialized application might be worth a shot.
A product like this, outside the box, is best suited for applications which are also "outside the box."
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snipped-for-privacy@ameritech.net says...

You're missing the point. Why would one want to use this fastener in preference to dowels or (perish the thought) joinery in a bannister in "a high-end house"?
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On 11/1/2015 7:46 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

Simply for ease to remove for the refreshing the finish of the banister out side of the house. Certainly in a high end home the smell of the stripping products, paint, varnish, stain, what ever would be objectionable.
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On Monday, November 2, 2015 at 9:02:38 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

...and those odors aren't objectionable in other homes? Do high end home owners have high end noses? ;-)
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On 11/2/2015 9:08 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

had customers where money is no object and they will pay anything to avoid any disruption in tranquility. If you are going to do $200K+ reno in a million dollar+ home they just might not want to smell the paint dry. This explains the low emission paints available for a premium these days.
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On 11/2/2015 10:08 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

High end owners are often willing to pay a lot to avoid such things. My step-father did a lot of work for high end customers. Amazing what they want and how much they will pay for it.
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On 11/2/2015 6:38 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

The name of the game. Not worth the hassle working for low end customers.
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On 11/3/15 7:32 AM, Swingman wrote:

Yep! As was brought up in another part of the interweps where you and I both converse, I'm finding that I don't ever want to be the lowest bidder, either.
Too many clients who hire the lowest bidder for price alone are never satisfied and want to leave the game feeling like they stuck it to you. Plus, when you bid a job too low it's way too tempting cut corners or quality to try to get out with more profit.
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-MIKE-

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