Vertical Panel Saw

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some- I think most- can rip. you rotate the saw to 90 degrees to the rails and push the plywood through it.
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wrote:

Bought the Milwaukee 6480 with extentions and crosscut stop for our community theater scene shop a couple of years ago. With a little attention to setup, accuracy is around 1/32". We use it to cut 1/4 to 3/4" plywood and mdf. Up to 1/2" - 4x8 sheets are easy to crosscut or rip by one person. 3/4" sheets are doable, but ripping is somewhat easier with 2 people. We probably average around 20 - 30 cuts per month and everyone who has used it wonders how we got along without it.
I'm lucky. When I have to make the occasional cut in a full sheet, I just haul it up to the playhouse. :0)
HTH Bill
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If I had a cabinet shop....
I made my kitchen cabinets and all sorts of built-in bookshelves. It easily paid for itself --- especially on wear and tear to my aging body.
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For me getting a panel saw was the same feeling as getting my first router.
I remember when I could actually put a round over on something now, I was totally stoked!
Rich
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On 29 Jul 2004 16:44:21 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Joeljcarver) wrote:

    FWW had a Shop Tip on a faux panel-saw. Take four 2x4s, notch them so they hang from above on a pipe you mount to the ceiling or the wall, and so they hang at about 5 degrees tilt when contacting the floor. Screw/glue a block near the bottom (at a comfortable height for you) of each 2x4 to support sheet goods. Use a clamp-n-guide to guide a circular saw to make vertical cuts (across the 4' width of the sheet). Accuracy depends on your ability to clamp the guide. You can cut anywhere on the sheet without contacting the 2x4s because they can be moved independently along the pipe.     To make horizontal cuts (along the 8' length) set the saw to cut the sheet plus 1/8" or so, and clamp the section *above* the cut line to the 2x4s to keep the cut section from closing the kerf.     When you're not using the jig, the 2x4s can be put away.
    Sounds good to me. I've installed the pipe, and when the next sheet needs cutting, I'll do the rest.
====Those are my principles. If you don't like them I have others. ===={remove curly brackets for email}
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On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 03:38:07 GMT, Chuck

But I dont HAVE 8 feet of wall to set it up on....
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On Thu, 29 Jul 2004 23:07:52 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

    Well, aside from the obvious (the sheet goods have the short side vertical) I'd love to see the saw operator reaching up nine feet or so to make a cut. Tough even for Shaq.
====Those are my principles. If you don't like them I have others. ===={remove curly brackets for email}
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I have a small sturdy step made for this purpose. Once the saw is in the guide it requires very little handling. I was using a trigger lock and a switch in the cord so I could start and stop the saw with my free hand but found it was not necessary. The worst part is eating the sawdust coming down on you. I solved the worst of that.
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On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 14:54:58 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@jamming.com vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
PMFJI.
This is a home-built panel saw? From the WW plans?
What sort of accuracies do you get from it, OOI? The ones that you buy, as you may have seen in this thread, that get 1/64" are very expensive.
TIA

***************************************************** It's not the milk and honey we hate. It's having it rammed down our throats.
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On Thu, 29 Jul 2004 23:07:52 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

I use the wall behind my DP and bandsaw. When cutting a sheet it covers a doorway as well. But when no in use takes zero space and actually stores two or three sheets ready to cut. I have to roll out my bandsaw to use it.
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snip

snip
Hey, Chuck, got a date or issue for this reference?
Dan
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On 2 Aug 2004 20:16:23 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gte.net (Dan Cullimore) wrote:

    FWW #153, Winter 2001-2002, pp16.
====Those are my principles. If you don't like them I have others. ===={remove curly brackets for email}
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Actually a guide for your circular saw(hanging from that pipe, i used hinges ) made from a sheet of heavy commercial arborite 16''wide x 9'6"long, two strips of oak lined with UHMW polyethylene glued on the arborite, and the entire thing locked in at the bottom will give you a cheap accurate panel saw that takes only a few inches of wall space. Pop the sheets behind the guide on a rail attached a foot above the floor, lock the guide in and cut.
Mine is behind my bandsaw so it take no space at all when not in use. I can actually cut a full 8 feet perpendicular, and virtually any angle as well by clamping the sheets at an angle behind the guide. To do this you need at least a ten foot ceiling because my saw travels DOWN the wall. The saw drops in at the top of the guide and because of the poly guides it really works well. Because I use a Porter Cable saw there is not much dust as I hook my shopvac to the sawdust port on the saw. Only draw back is you need something to stand on when cutting full eight foot lengths.
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horizontally, what's to stop the weight of the upper piece clamping down on the saw blade as it goes by?
The operator pulls up slightly on the upper piece on the outfeed side as you pull it through. It's really simple. If you're nervous about precise ripping, you can cut the stock slightly oversize and then trim the more managable piece on your tablesaw.

the blade.
Not needed.
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