Verizon DSL

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Sssshhh! For God's sake don't tell the EPA!
--RC Sleep? Isn't that a totally inadequate substitute for caffine?
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On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 04:04:13 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@TAKEOUTmindspring.com wrote:

Upstream of who's water supply ?
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<snip>

The forest service has rules to follow, when the areas get this level of intensive use. As a veteran of more than one water system/septic system upgrade in the middle of forest service land, I tend to agree with them.
And the serious outbreak of 'flu-like symptoms' at one of our council's camps a decade or so ago leads me to believe that not all of the hygiene efforts were successful. That camp closed in early July, and didn't open again that year. Pretty much over-use.
BSA camping is not, and hasn't been for a long time, a wilderness experience. A wilderness experience is best done in very small groups, rather than with 100 kids.
Patriarch
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Silvan wrote:

Doesn't mean that there is no address. If it's taxed, if there's a way to get mail there, if it's off a state or municipal road then there's an address of some kind.
--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comNOSPAM (Brandystew) wrote in

Yes, what do you want to know?
I've had a 1.5mbs/384kbs for two years to our house in FL, business service with a static IP and my own email server. In that time we've had four outages, one due to a config change on IP ranges without notification, two due to gateway issues resolved after calls to tech support. One due to a powersupply fault on the router.modem at our end, which the came out and fixed withing four hours of the call. Other than those problems its worked fine and has always maintained bandwidth as far as we can measure. It's usefull getting all our telephone and internet charges on on bill. Sales group and pricing are usually pretty good. Getting anything implemented other than a service defined in the sales brochure is a lottery as to whether they can put it in correctly. If you have a support problem then expect a long time on the phone. The call queues are usually long. The implementation and support groups are split by function and geography and they don't talk to each other. For example the DNS group are all but useless, the people looking after the verizon gateways are very good. Anything to do with hosting or backbone issues are another company entirely.
hth
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About a year and a half ago, I gave them a try. First they told me it wasn't available in my area; and my incoming wires were no good. Well, my apartment is in a building 1 FOOT from the verizon building, and the wires are the old heavy copper ones.....they said I was too far away. Well, when I convinced them 1 FOOT wasn't too far, they hooked it up, but could never get it to work. However they did manage to continue to bill me for it for over a year, and after a lot of screaming they finally credited 10 months back to me.
Gee, maybe they are better now??
However, at my other place, I have Comcast cable and can't say enough good things about them. Once my modem died, and they had a new one to me in 1 1/2 hours. Can't beat that.

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wrote:

The critical distance with DSL isn't the distance to the Verizon office, it's the distance to the local phone company's switch. And it _is_ critical. So is the quality of the lines. The fact that they're old is not a point in their favor.
Short form: I'm not sure they were giving you the runaround and anyone considering DSL needs to check those two factors.
I got Earthlink and I had about a three-week fight before we got the connection working reliably.
Not that I'd reccomend Earthlink. They outsourced their customer support to India a couple of years ago and service has gone absolutely to hell.
--RC
Sleep? Isn't that a totally inadequate substitute for caffine?
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snipped-for-privacy@TAKEOUTmindspring.com wrote:

For an interesting alternative to both DSL and cable, see http://www.pbs.org/cringely/pulpit/pulpit20041125.html . I hope that the fear of credible competition puts some service back into this market. Unfortunately, it's more likely that the established providers will fight this with politics and lawsuits.
--
Howard Lee Harkness
Healthcare for the uninsurable: http://AffHC.HLHins.com
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Just got it last night. Good telephone service then the CD didn't work.
375 upload speeds, 1800+ DL speeds.
Northern, NJ...
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. http://www.autodrill.com http://www.multi-spindle-heads.com
V8013

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Brandystew wrote:

No, not in my home. I live in Fiberoptic Junction, and can't get DSL here.
I have, however, set up Verizon DSL for two clients. The process in my case involved doing a network installation of Debian Linux, and downloading somewhere around 500 MB of packages from the fastest available server. I found at both locations that the download speed was around 150 Kps. This is less than half the speed of cable, but the difference between 5 Kps and 150 Kps is plenty enough to grab your attention and make you think you just put a rocket ship in your computer.
The only measure of reliability I have is whether or not people call me with problems. They would call me to deal with Verizon for them (a free part of the service) and I haven't had to call Verizon yet. One of them has been running for about a year now.
All in all, it's a pretty good deal. As an installer, I prefer using a router for my own benefit. Routers eliminate the need to futz with all the fiddly PPPoE configuration nonsense, and save me effort. The most recent install came with a router as part of the package, and I think perhaps that is because Verizon themselves recognize how much easier life is when you let the router manage that stuff transparently.
Like every other format of broadband I have experienced, Windows is pretty much inescapable for getting the ball rolling the first time. Once the modem is provisioned, it no longer matters what platform you're running. However, it's probably necessary to keep a copy of Windows in your pocket somewhere in case you ever have to provision a new modem at some point in the future.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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Silvan wrote:

OK, as a dialup customer, the term "provision a modem" is new to me. Was ist?
--
Homo sapiens is a goal, not a description.

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Larry Blanchard wrote:

Setting the thing up for the first time, basically. You don't just take it out of the box, plug it in, and get online. You have to jump through some hoops to prove who you are. I imagine this is especially true for cable modems, since the cable company has no way of knowing who you are except by the MAC address of the modem you're using.
I don't understand the inner workings of the process or I never would have spent four hours screwing with reinstalling Windows (because I had to feed it all those stupid driver CDs to get it running well enough to run the setup program) just to do this.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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<snip>

The best thing to do is ignore their process. Their process is designed to automate the installation in a standard manner.
When you are using anything that isn't a plain-vanilla setup, you are far better off to put something in the middle to talk to their network. In my case, it has always been a not terribly expensive router. Our first one was a FreeBSD box that one of the kids put together from leftover parts, a 1-floppy type super low end box that did simple routing and address translation. The current box is a less than $150 firewall/router, from SMC, with features that were $50k when I got my first dialup account.
Today's routers handle all of the network config dynamically. There's very little reason for you to have to run their software on your desktop. And their software is almost never current.
My cynical experience says that you do NOT want the provider to label you as 'one of those LINUX guys'.
Patriarch, who knows more about the business side of this stuff than is good for the soul...
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patriarch wrote:

Yeah, but I spent two days picking some of the best brains on Earth trying to figure out how to get the cable modem to do something, to no avail. After I finally went through the ordeal of setting up Windows far enough to run their stupid little program, it woke up. I hadn't been doing anything wrong. Upstream just wasn't talking to me yet because I hadn't spoken the right magic words to it. After that, I haven't needed Windows since.

I have a not terribly expensive router. That's exactly why I bought it. :) I figure if I tell them I'm running Linux, they backpedal, but if I tell them I have my OS set up to talk to my Cheapass Ultrasuck 2000 XL router using DHCP, then they gloss over the user config side of it and focus in on the real issues.
I don't even have any other computers hooked to it, and I'm not using its crappy firewall, so it's pretty pointless except as insurance against being told I'm running an unsupported operating system.

No, you don't, although my experience with my current provider has been that once I manage to get through the layers of drones whose job it is to weed out the imbeciles, most of the real techs upstream are running Linux at home. :)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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Have had it for over a year now, very few problems. Am in former GTE territory, so I avoid the PPPoE nonsense. The VZ software is pretty intrusive, dumped all that, it didn't do anything useful anyway. Use of a firewall is absolutely, positively mandatory! Receive about one virus infection attempt per second. VZ does not filter the ports, so you see lots of probes.
-- Tom

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comNOSPAM (Brandystew) wrote in message

I have Verizon DSL in Maryland. It's been up for about a year with no problems at all. I get excellant upload/download speeds. Verizon differs greatly from place to place, what you really need to look at is how it runs in your area. Go to http://www.dslreports.com and you can search for reports specific to your area.
Jo
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On 24 Nov 2004 13:32:30 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comNOSPAM (Brandystew) wrote:

I've had Verizon DSL in NE NJ since day one. The first year was not good. Since then they've become very reliable. In my area, DSL is much less costly than cable. If you frequent the Newsgroups you'll find Verizon wins out over cable in retention and completion. The downside? Technical support. Do get yourself a gateway router to use as a firewall and eliminate the need to install that dreadful PPOE and Verizon software.
TomL
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Do tell me more about this please... Just got DSL and was thinking of using the provided modem/router combo unit for the house as it is both wired and wireless.
--


Joe - V#8013 - '86 VN750 - joe @ yunx .com
Northern, NJ
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Joe wrote:

In Maryland, near Washington DC, Verizon sends new DSL customers a combination DSL modem / router / 4-port hub / wireless hub. At least that's what they sent friends of mine, who I help get connected three weekends ago. It was relatively painless to get set up, although it did take one call to tech support. The user name and password for the modem wasn't included in the documentation.
-- Mark
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Mark Jerde wrote:

eliminate
is
that's
weekends ago.

call to

included in

I live in NW Virginia just outside DC and am confronted with the same request for a user name and password. Do you remember what they are? And, what did you use (in Linux) to connect to Verizon? I am running Fedora 3. Please just let me know. Thanks, Cliff
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