Veneering technique

So far I haven't tried to veneer, preferring the "smug satisfaction" of solid wood. But I plan to make some cigar humidors which require that the interiors be veneered with cedar.
When it comes to interior veneers, is it preferable to apply the veneer before or after the glue-up of the box? My suspicion is that the interior corners will look much neater if the veneer is applied before assembuhly (as Norm would say) but there may be some hidden pitfalls this way.
FoggyTown
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For something that small and veneers that thin, I would attach the veneers and assemble the box.
Actually I would attach the veneer to the board before cutting out the box parts.
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: So far I haven't tried to veneer, preferring the "smug satisfaction" of : solid wood. But I plan to make some cigar humidors which require that : the interiors be veneered with cedar.
Why do the plans call for cedar veneer? The point of using Spanish cedar (which is a mahogany, not a cedar) is that it is exceptional at helping maintain the ~70% humidity cigars need. I doubt that a veneer is going to have enough mass to hold the moisture needed.
Whay not go for what seems to be the more standard method, which involves building a box in a box. The interior box is made of Spanish cedar, about 1/4" thick.
: When it comes to interior veneers, is it preferable to apply the veneer : before or after the glue-up of the box?
Before, I guess. Or go with more standard construction (see above).
    -- Andy Barss
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I just built a humidor in solid mahogony with a veneered figured bubinga top. the inside is 1/4 inch spanish ceder which i cut snugly to shape and floats in the bottom part, for the top lip i epoxeyed the edge pieces of ceder and put a small amount of epoxy on the middle(interior) of the top to hold its postion while alowing for a little movement. The spanish ceder is not for looks, it provides humidification control for the box. spanish ceder is used due to its rot/bug resistence. on some humidors constuction is with solid (3/4") ceder with veneered fancy wood on the exterior. I am the furthest thing from an expert but wanted to put in my .02
first time poster...long time reader (I've learned a lot here....thanks guys)
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You can't "veneer" the insides of cigar humidors. The cedar lining is done as "slips" instead, a loosely held thick veneer that isn't stuck down. Think of it as a three-dimensional framed panel. Bigger ones are thick enough to be rigid, as a simple box within a box. Humidity inside a humidor would play havoc with any traditional veneering techniques.
OTOH, the outside is traditionally a place to practice your best veneering and inlay techniques.
Of course the cheap commmercial ones are done by pre-veneering the board. They use a heat-set adhesive and a big press. You can do it this way too, but it isn't cabinetry, it's just box making. Might as well shop at Ikea.
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