Veneering question

I'm about to embark on my first large veneering project (queen-size headboard). My previous efforts at veneering have used hot hide glue and a veneer hammer, with good results -- but I don't think that's going to work very well for something this large. I'm moving into uncharted territory here. Uncharted for me, anyway... hopefully not for some of you.
I know that I need to veneer both sides of each panel for stability -- my first question is whether the veneers on the opposite sides of the panels need to be close to the same *thickness*. The veneer I've selected for the show side is 1/40" walnut burl. I have on hand an ample supply of 1/16" poplar veneer. Will that be suitable for the back face, or do I need something closer to the thickness of the show veneer? The panel will be 3/4" MDF, and I'm planning to use urea-formaldehyde glue (Weldwood Plastic Resin Glue).
Second question: does the burl veneer need a backing veneer, or can I glue it directly to the MDF panel?
Third question: I'll be doing this in a vacuum press. Should I veneer both sides at once, or one at a time? If one at a time, which side should go first?
Thanks to all for any help you can give me.
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Both sides don't have to be the same thickness.
Do the back side first. If there are any errors, glitches, problems, etc., you will identify and correct them before working on the face side.
Do a test run with a small piece of your walnut on some scrap. Check to ma ke sure the glue doesn't penetrate through the veneer, to the surface. Re duce the amount of glue you apply, if it does penetrate to the surface. Si nce you've done this before, I would think you won't have a penetration iss ue, but it's always good to do a test run.
*If all goes bad, you can always upholster the headboard. LOL.
Sonny
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"Doug Miller" wrote in message
I'm about to embark on my first large veneering project (queen-size headboard). My previous efforts at veneering have used hot hide glue and a veneer hammer, with good results -- but I don't think that's going to work very well for something this large. I'm moving into uncharted territory here. Uncharted for me, anyway... hopefully not for some of you.
I know that I need to veneer both sides of each panel for stability -- my first question is whether the veneers on the opposite sides of the panels need to be close to the same *thickness*. The veneer I've selected for the show side is 1/40" walnut burl. I have on hand an ample supply of 1/16" poplar veneer. Will that be suitable for the back face, or do I need something closer to the thickness of the show veneer? The panel will be 3/4" MDF, and I'm planning to use urea-formaldehyde glue (Weldwood Plastic Resin Glue).
Second question: does the burl veneer need a backing veneer, or can I glue it directly to the MDF panel?
Third question: I'll be doing this in a vacuum press. Should I veneer both sides at once, or one at a time? If one at a time, which side should go first?
Thanks to all for any help you can give me.
I have always used contact glue with know problems. WW
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On 3/19/2013 9:28 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

I took a a veneer class a few years ago.
What took place,
1. There was no mention or attention paid to the thickness of the veneer on either side. You are basically adding another vapor barrier, the glue surface, with a veneer on top when adding the backing.
2. We used no backing, some veneers come with a backing for easier adhesion, sticky surface, some do not. The only time any thing was added was when taping seams together. This was done on the show side and sanded off after glue up. If you tape on the glue side the tape could telegraph through.
3. We veneered both aides at once, and used MDF on both outer surfaces to clamp against. We put waxed paper between the outer MDF and the veneer in case any glue squeezed through the veneer.
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On 3/19/2013 10:28 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

I don't know if you saw it, but Tommy Mac ("Rough Cut") had a nice show on veneering a few weeks ago. He used a backing veneer. I would think it particularly makes sense for the thinner stuff: 1) You would avoid tearing it and 2) It would improve the speed as which you could apply it to the MDF.
I dont' think there are any issues with veneering both sides of a piece of MDF (like there would be with solid wood).
Of course, I've never done any veneering and for all *I* know about it, wood grows on trees! :)
Bill
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On 3/19/2013 12:50 PM, Bill wrote:

Yep, there is most certainly is ... _always_ veneer both sides of the substrate.
Take your cue from the plywood manufacturers ... _always_ an odd number of layers/cores, centered around the middle core.
<MDF is more dimensionally stable than most woods, but it is still subject to the same forces when maintaining EMC (equilibrium moisture content) as wood products, albeit of a smaller magnitude>.
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"Swingman" wrote:

------------------------------------------ One exception comes to mind.
1/2" or is it 12 mm, CDX ply which is available in both 3 and 4 ply.
Lew
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