Varnish = Urethane ????

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synthetic. There are still some makers out there that use natural resins such as rosin and amber. Tried and True finishes is one example.
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MikeG
Heirloom Woods
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On 01 Dec 2004 02:54:32 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (JMWEBER987) spake the words:

If you swear by Microsoft, buy ALL the brands the TV commercials tell you to buy, and spray paint on your head to cover your bald spot, go for it. You obviously won't know the difference. ;(
The reason I'm so down on poly is that very few people can put on a urethane finish without making it look like the piece was wrapped in Saran and they're prone to miniscule bubbles which make it look even worse. Abused, it's a cheesy finish which is hell to repair. The wipe-on polys are better, a step in the right direction, IMHO.
Otherwise, use a non-urethane varnish which won't have to be stripped with the most caustic aircraft paint remover known to man.

Yes, or Russ at http://www.woodfinishingsupplies.com/Varnishes.htm
Yes, Watco (very small amount of varnish), Waterlox (tung oil + more varnish), and Tried & True varnish-oil are all great varnish-based finishes. I've always loved varnish above all other finishes, despite its longer drying time, though I haven't found a straight poly-free varnish recently. I stopped looking when I found Waterlox. Since I don't do glossy finishes (rubbing the gloss down to satin with 0000 steel wool and paste wax once it's dry), I don't have to worry about slower-drying varnish gathering dust as much as gloss lovers do.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Uh, there are paint removers that will remove cured polyurethane from epoxy without damaging the epoxy. The ones that remove the epoxy too are "the most caustic aircraft paint removers known to man".

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--John
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@aol.com says...

finish of oil, carrier/thinner, resin, polyurethane and urethane are varnishes. The only difference being the type of resin used and the hype the advertisement people give it.
If you want to get picky about it and throw in archaic definitions the whole mess can get quite complex.
My take is that, for almost all practical purposes, it matters little which octane varnish is used. Of course my take is also to avoid varnish whenever possible and practical.
You also will find spar/marine varnish. This is a long oil varnish, a higher ration of oil to resin making for a more flexible finish that can better accommodate the movement of wood in an outdoor environment. However it is still a surface finish made up of an oil, carrier/thinner, resin.
Hope it helps
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MikeG
Heirloom Woods
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All of this has helped but OP now has a headache. I think I will drive to Tulsa (90 miles) this weekend and visit the Woodcraft store for some recommended finishes. Mike in Arkansas
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