Using studs of different material


I am building a playhouse, where for Wall studs I would like to use a more expensive material (e.g. Cedar) but use cheaper (Pine or something else) for roof studs and studs which are higher up where children can't reach. Any issues in doing it?
Thanks
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No, not at all. Pine is not going to be a problem for kids unless you are referring to Pressure treated Pine.
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First of all, roofs are constructed of rafters, ceilings joists, and walls studs. You can combine all sorts of wood when framing without a problem. Unless the studs are going to be exposed to the weather I don't see any point in using cedar. Buy some nice smooth premium studs if you are concerned about splinters. Douglas Fir is the one of the best dimensional lumbers but for your purposes any clean, dry, smooth stud should do nicely.
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I guess if you are getting picky, wall studs are generally not used in a roof. Regular 2x4's but usually not the more costly studs.
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Won't harm anything. OTOH, why not just use the pine for it all? After the kids are grown it will become a storage shed anyway.
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On 21 Jul 2005 13:31:31 -0700, ak snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Here in the UK I'd use larch. Cheapest timber around (12/cubic foot) and good rot resistance owing to the high resin content. It's not something you'll find at the Borg, but it's pretty much universal for cheap timber framing (i.e. not in oak).
Is larch used much in the USA ?
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wrote:

Nope. Too many more useful high quality timbers available. Mine lagging and trestle-building business has sort of gone down the toilet as well. Pulp is about it.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Nope. Not much, though I'm sure some. |
Indulage my early morning laziness: a cubic foot of wood equals how many precut (stud length) 2x4s? Or, to be less mean, 8' 2x4s. And does the cube allow for waste? Today's 2x4s are something like 1-1/2" x 3-1/2".
I won't ask what 12 pounds is worth.
Hey, what's happening to the euro? Not many quotes in euros these days, from anywhere in Europe. The word around here is it's going in the toilet as a currency soon, with a return to the good old days of individualism amongst moneylenders.
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Charlie Self wrote: ...

None... :)
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Indulage my early morning laziness: a cubic foot of wood equals how many precut (stud length) 2x4s? Or, to be less mean, 8' 2x4s. And does the cube allow for waste? Today's 2x4s are something like 1-1/2" x 3-1/2".
I won't ask what 12 pounds is worth.
Hey, what's happening to the euro? Not many quotes in euros these days, from anywhere in Europe. The word around here is it's going in the toilet as a currency soon, with a return to the good old days of individualism amongst moneylenders.
Think about it Charlie. 12x12 = 1 BF. A BF is a cubic measurement, too.
Britain doesn't do Euros, which is why the pound was quoted.
With VAT, probably two bucks a BF. If he's including VAT, buck and a quarter.
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George wrote:

A 1-ft cube == 1 cu-ft --> 12 bd-ft, not 1. (12" high(thick) by 1-ft wide by 1-ft long)...
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You're a hoot. Do you READ? 12x12 is a square, not a cube. But, as noted, a BF is a cubic measurement. I imagine you can figure out the multiplier that will make a 12x12 into a BF?
OK, just in case you don't read it's 1.
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George wrote:

The question posted was "a cubic foot of wood" which is a cube 1ft on a side (or any equivalent volume) which is 12-in^3 = 1728 in^3.
A board foot (as you noted) is 1 sq-ft surface area times 1-inch thickness == 144 in^3.
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Yes, quite well.

Quite true. What does that have to do with the subject at hand?

Again, I ask, what does that have to do with the subject at hand?
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Snicker.
Lemme see, if you could read, you might have seen this thread originate with one cubic foot of wood valued at twelve pounds sterling.
Then, if you cared to think, you might have figured out, unlike the questioner and bonehead, that 12*12*1 was a BF, with twelve of them within a one foot cube.
Or, you could complain and remain spherically ignorant.
That's equal from any vantage point.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

I suspect a fair amount gets folded into the nondescript "whitewood" class, but have no statistics nor way to confirm/disprove that guess I know of...
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Thanks all for your reply. I was worred about splinters, but I think , as suggested, I will go with nicely finished pine or Douglas Fir.
Thanks Again.
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