Using stainless all thread in large cutting board?

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I am making my mom a rather large cutting board as she needs it. between 2ftx2ft and 3ftx3ft. (Need to measure her counter.)
It will be made of hard maple. She wants it flat (no feet) so she can use both sides.
I was wondering if I could use 3/8 stainless all thread through it to decrease the likelihood of warping. Or will this just cause more problems?
If I use all thread, should I use a tap and thread the holes the all thread goes through? Should I drill and install the all thread once it is glued? Should I use glue on the all thread?
I will have to make this in "sections" then install the sections together. (My planer is not big enough to plane the entire piece.
Any advice from you experts is appreciated!
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On 12/7/2015 12:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You would not want to thread the wood. I don't think all thread will prevent warping, the rod will just move with the wood.
I would consider capturing the ends in a breadboard . I would not do the tenon full length, as you want to have the support of the breadboard, so I would make 3 full size tongues and cut between them so that you can leave most of the wood in the breadboards. This will leave the strength with the breadboard ends to keep the cutting board from warping. That's my opinion.
If you need a diagram, I can draw one when I get home and upload it.
--
Jeff

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wrote:

Definitely even if using the althread, put end stringers on.
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On Mon, 7 Dec 2015 09:51:18 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Use stainless stee, althread and a few Bellville washers to allow the block the expand and shring without loosing tension. Bore flat-bottomed holes for the nuts/washers - stainless washer against the wood - pair or 2 of belleviles, then the nut. Torque just enough to start compressing the bellvilles with the wood dry. If the wood "grows" it will copress the bellvilles a bit more, and the tension on the althread won't change appreciably. Do this on both ends of the allthread. 1/4 inch would be more than adequate.
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On Monday, December 7, 2015 at 12:57:23 PM UTC-8, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That's good advice, but probably a Belleville washer won't be rust-resistant, I'd use rubber washers instead, from neoprene gasket sheets. You don't want the high stress a 3/8" rod would provide, 1/4" -20 or #10-32 would be plenty.
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wrote:

They do make stainless steel Bellevilles. Very common in food and chemical production equipment, as well as agressive steem and caustic manufacturing environments (and marine use)
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On 12/7/2015 11:51 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

If it wants to warp a steel rod is not going to stop that.
Glue using a waterproof glue like Weldwood.
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On Mon, 7 Dec 2015 09:51:18 -0800 (PST) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

it will be heavy from hard maple at that size
woodchucker has a good plan
you could also do end grain style
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On 12/7/2015 12:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It would be nice to make something for mom. Mom would also like to brag to her friends what a nice boy you are and make her such a nice cutting board.
Then there is practicality. If this is a utilitarian board to be primarily a work piece, as opposed to a fancy board with decorative qualities, buy, don't build. Considering the price of wood, the labor involved, mass produced boards make sense, especially if it is just used for butchering possums she traps.
http://www.lumberliquidators.com/ll/c/x-lft-Maple-Butcher-Block-Countertop-Williamsburg-Butcher-Block-Co.-MABB8/10006983
Don't know if they have maple, but not a bad price for oak http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/60274964/
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wrote:

If its utilitarian buy a piece of HDPE and be done with it. The stuff is cheap enough I buy it as stock for cutting plastic parts on the CNC mill.
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Some pretty good Bamboo boards out here too at reasonable prices -(mabee not cheaper than you can make one with hardwood scraps, if you value your time at more than 2 bits per hour, but close!!!)
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On 12/7/2015 7:58 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I would never use oak for food. The grain is too open pored for food. Maple, beech, Cherry, some others, but not oak.
I don't see anything wrong with making it, I just don't see using SS all thread. Just wood.
--
Jeff

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wrote:

White oak manages to hold wine and booze in barrels for years. I'd not use red oak.
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On Tue, 08 Dec 2015 06:07:42 -0500

white oak imparts certain flavors into the wine as well
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On Tue, 8 Dec 2015 09:22:03 -0800, Electric Comet

Whisky too.
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On 12/8/2015 6:07 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

That's different. It's liquid, not food that needs to be cleaned out. The casks are for turning the booze into quality booze.
Cutting boards on the other hand need to be cleaned of food, otherwise it will get rancid.
--
Jeff

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On Mon, 7 Dec 2015 19:58:39 -0500

dunno how anyone could use a store bought contraption to butcher possums on although i would like to see the ikea photos of the possum with one of their snazzy boards probably add that to the list of things that we will never see
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

If you use all thread, don't tap each board. Only the last board should be threaded, but if you're using a nut at either end no boards need to be threaded. The threads will interfere with getting a tight joint between the boards.
You can demonstrate this effect with a bolt and two nuts. Thread one nut on to the bolt then the other. Notice how you have to move one independently of the other to get them tight? With boards, it's like holding both nuts while turning the bolt. Even if you start tight, you won't be able to keep it super tight like you need for a glue joint.
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 12/7/2015 12:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

(Need to measure her counter.)

No need for all-thread, or anything. Just glue it together. The trick is in the grain pattern and moisture levels of the wood. If the wood is quarter sawn, not much chance of warping. If the wood is going to warp, it will warp, or crack, one or the other, or both. If the wood is kiln dried, and flat to start with, chances are good it will not warp.
You will read that alternating the end grain with cup up, and cup down will prevent the board from bowing, or cupping, but if the individual boards are wide enough, that will just cause a waving motion. Look for vertical end grain, and you will be good. If you can't find quarter sawn, or rift sawn boards, then alternate the end grain and cut the boards narrow, like under 2 inches and cross your fingers.
--
Jack
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I already have the hard maple boards. They have been sitting on a pallet in my garage for a year. The wood is kiln dried. Since it has been in my unhe ated but insulated garage, should I bring it in my house before building it ? (To acclimate?)
Also, for some reason I have read people don't like it, but on the other sm aller cutting boards I have built, I have had good luck with the poly glue that you use moisture to cure. It does foam out and make a mess, but I only have to glue one side and wet the other. It seems to work good for me anyw ay.
On Monday, December 7, 2015 at 11:51:21 AM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

2ftx2ft and 3ftx3ft. (Need to measure her counter.)

both sides.

rease the likelihood of warping. Or will this just cause more problems?

ad goes through? Should I drill and install the all thread once it is glued ? Should I use glue on the all thread?

. (My planer is not big enough to plane the entire piece.

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