Using sawdust as fuel

Page 1 of 2  
Anybody ever do anything productive with their sawdust? I'm not talking about using a handful for this or that but for the majority of it produced. Is there a way to effectively turn it into a log (block,etc) for a firepit, etc?
I was thinking about a water/glue solution to form it but then I'm thinking, is that smart?
--
Message posted via CraftKB.com
http://www.craftkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/woodworking/200710/1
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ever seen compressed sawdust and glue? If not, just visit your local cheap furniture store.
The Threshermen used to run their threshing machines really hard and then throw sawdust in the fire box to get a spark show.
Model railroaders used to die it and use it as grass, ballast, and other such ground coverings.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
*snip*

Oops... Wrong form of "die." Should be:
Model railroaders used to dye it and use it as grass, ballast, and other such ground coverings.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fri, Oct 5, 2007, 9:47pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Puckdropper) <snip>The Threshermen used to run their threshing machines really hard and then throw sawdust in the fire box to get a spark show. <snip>
Where'd you hear that one? The steam threshers I know of used straw as fuel, plenty of sparks from that, which is why the chimneys needed spark arresters. One of the last things you'd want in a dry field of "fuel" would be sparks.
JOAT "I'm an Igor, thur. We don't athk quethtionth." "Really? Why not?" "I don't know, thur. I didn't athk."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote in (Puckdropper)

You're getting in to youthful memories of one event, so they're bound to be inaccurate.
What I remember is seeing it done at the Threshermen's Reunion in Pontiac, IL. There was plenty of green grass around, so little chance of the field catching on fire.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sat, Oct 6, 2007, 2:58am (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Puckdropper) doth claimeth: You're getting in to youthful memories of one event, so they're bound to be inaccurate. What I remember is seeing it done at the Threshermen's Reunion in Pontiac, IL. There was plenty of green grass around, so little chance of the field catching on fire.
Well, no. "I" was talking of machines actually threshing in a field, working for real, not a show. However, a real steam thresher did NOT want sparks. http://books.google.com/books?id=9xo8AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA531&lpg=PA531&dq=steam+thresher&source=web&ots=ucc8Z3DGAK&sig=UKUb1BUOAnl-t3xPfQW3TIHkIDk Obviously, you're getting in to youthful memories of one event, so they're bound to be inaccurate.
JOAT "I'm an Igor, thur. We don't athk quethtionth." "Really? Why not?" "I don't know, thur. I didn't athk."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
WonderMonkey via CraftKB.com wrote:
| Anybody ever do anything productive with their sawdust? I'm not | talking about using a handful for this or that but for the majority | of it produced. Is there a way to effectively turn it into a log | (block,etc) for a firepit, etc? | | I was thinking about a water/glue solution to form it but then I'm | thinking, is that smart?
Well, at least you're thinking. Mix it well with parafin shavings, pack it into a pipe form, and compress it with a hydraulic ram. You may want to experiment with the mix ratios and the pressure. :-)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There was a local company that made firelogs, with a combination of shavings, sawdust, and parafin. The logs worked great for a firestarter for campfires, and would last a couple hours on their own. They were compressed into trapazodial shapes. I think they're out of business now, but we've got a few of them in a storage shed, since my dad was involved with making the factory.
Clint

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Clint" wrote:

firestarter for

compressed
we've got

making the

There is an outfit in Stockton, Ca that manufactures fireplace logs using waste materials.
As far as I know, they are still in business.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

There are companies still out there. A couple that come to mind are Duraflame and Presto Logs.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill wrote:

As somebody else noted, the big thing in making them so they'll burn is that they use something as an accelerant. Sawdust in a log w/o it doesn't burn well on its own.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd stay away from Duraflame, putting one of those in a fireplace is like calling in an airstrike with napalm, I can smell those when anyone in the neighborhood is burning them, like a chemical spill. The best compressed-sawdust fireplace logs I found were sold under the name "Hi Energy" and didn't seem to have the wax or chemicals or whatever it is Duraflame saturates their logs with.
It should be possible to make your own compressed sawdust logs using say a 3" or 4" pipe and some sort of ram, it's just a question of the value you put on the time you'll use to do so.
http://www.epa.gov/woodstoves/efficiently.html
Of course if you're a coffee drinker than you can get really creative. ;^)
http://quickstart.clari.net/voa/art/gb/2005-02-16-voa51.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wow. We compost both sawdust and coffee grounds, about anything organic except bones and scrap meat. Less time wasted, IMO.
It does pay to keep walnut chips and sawdust out of the compost, but otherwise, we've had no problems. I did find that a separate pile of walnut waste starts allowing plants to grow after about 5 or 6 years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have in the past, when I had more sawdust than fire logs, filled paper bags with sawdust and added them one at a time to a burning fire. The paper bag burns away and the sawdust slowly ignites and burns down. No mess no problems. Just keep the bags small enough that you don't overload the fire or smother the existing fire.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fri, Oct 5, 2007, 8:52pm (EDT+4) u37947@uwe (WonderMonkeyviaCraftKB.com) mumbles; Anybody ever do anything productive with their sawdust? I'm not talking about using a handful for this or that but for the majority of it produced. Is there a way to effectively turn it into a log (block,etc) for a firepit, etc? I was thinking about a water/glue solution to form it but then I'm thinking, is that smart?
Yes. Yes, but not me. Yes. Depends on what you mean by smart.
JOAT "I'm an Igor, thur. We don't athk quethtionth." "Really? Why not?" "I don't know, thur. I didn't athk."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hmmmm.... turn a log into sawdust, then turn the sawdust back into a log? Why not just burn the log in the first place?
B.

produced.
firepit,
thinking,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"WonderMonkey via CraftKB.com" wrote:

talking
You approach the problem the same way the electric utilities burn powdered coal, you aerate the sawdust, then let it burn as it falls.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Both sound a bit involved to me. In _Downhome_Ways_ by Jerry Mack Johnson, he recommends taking a large (empty) paint can or other round metal container, removing the lid, improvising legs, and cutting a circular hole a couple inches in diameter in the middle. Dry sawdust is then packed in around a suitable form (round stick or pipe stuck through the hole), the forming rod removed, and the contents lit using a wadded up piece of newspaper stuck in the middle. It's claimed to burn laterally 1 1/2 to 2 inches per hour.
I've not tried it myself, but it sounds reasonable (outdoors or at least in a very well-ventilated place, of course).
--
Andrew Erickson

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the intermediate step involves extracting some boards from the log first....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Water -- and pressure -- are the binders used to produce commercial fuel pellets. No need for glue, which would likely foul up your chimney.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.