using sandpaper on a glass sheet to sharpen chisels

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Y'know the more of this thread I read, it occurs to me that most cities have surplus/recovered building material yards these days. A properly sized chunk of half inch glass or granite or something similar ought to be easy enough to find at a true bargain price. Some of the local countertop places will (as long as you ask 'em first) allow you to look in their dumpster for scrap chunks. It's possible to make a boatload of guitar saddles and nuts out of a small piece of corian.
Ed
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That would have to be a small boatload. Conservation of mass, and all. ;)
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LOL. Ok, a bunch.
Ed
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you can get a yardsale dining room tabletop for about $20, which can make a lot of sharpening plates.
regards, charlie cave creek, az
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If you have a good tablesaw, jointer or shaper you already have a flat surface suitable for scarysharp.
scott
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Enco has a 12x18 granite plate for $24.95, and a 8x12 for $14.95
Current coupons are
WBJ9C - 10% off purchases of $99 or more WBJ9R - free shipping on orders of $50 or more - expires Jan 31st.
You just missed the coupon for free shipping on orders of $25 or more.
Here are the plates:
http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INLMK3?PMK0NO 2819
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We had good luck many years ago getting a sample grave marker from a monument company. The samples were engraved, but only an inch or two thick. There was plenty of unengraved surface around the edges for your purpose. An engineer at our company told us that these monuments are remarkably flat due to the process used to polish them.
I think we got ours for free. We had to rebuild a heater assembly in the field. It needed to have heat diffusors recemented to a hollow faced bronze heating device and the diffusors had to be very flat. We got some funny looks carrying that tombstone into the motel room where we did the work.
Pete Stanaitis ----------------
Freedom Nut wrote:

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Now that you have the glass this jig from Wood magazine is easy to make and works great. http://tinyurl.com/c8h6tg
You sharpen side to side with it but it gets blades sharper than I was able to do by hand.
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On Thu, 22 Jan 2009 04:41:42 -0800, Limp Arbor wrote:

I missed the start of this thread - has anybody mentioned Scary Sharp yet?
One of many copies of the original Usenet post:
<http://wood.bigelowsite.com/articles/scary_sharp.htm
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That's the one I was looking for - Thanks Paul. This should cover everything quite nicely!
Jummy (aka Minwax Mac)
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Why should it be 1/2" thick? Is it to

I don't use this method however I have used to use a lot of PSA/self sticking sand paper. I have to think that one of the primary reason to use thicker glass is to lessen the possibility of breaking the glass when trying to remove the old sand paper or if not used on a perfectly flat surface to lessen the possibility of breaking the glass. Some brands of PSA sand paper can be very difficult to remove. A secondary reason could be to insure a surface that stays flat however there are easy ways to insure that thinner glass remains flat, fasten it to a flat surface.
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I used a piece of glass from an old 8x10 picture frame. I glued it using super glue to a piece of scrap plywood. I used Super glue because it took very little glue, it has a very thin body to it, and it wouldn't leave any air pockets that could develop from rubber cement or sprays. I was completely bored one day and framed it in so that the framing was flush with the surface of the glass. Once you do this, you can get a chisel "scary sharp." I had a set of Stanley chisels that would shave wood as easily as the hair on your arm. My block planes demanded more respect than ever before. It also disciplined me to take better care of them when I got through using them. If you invest your own time in sharpening, you tend to do things like this. I never took them higher than a 400 grit wet or dry paper and I found that using water to form the slurry was just fine. You can make a sharpening block quite easily by using your miter box saw and dial in the desired - the most important ingredient to a successful edge: PATIENCE. You can polish the face so smooth that it can be used as a mirror. Have fun with it.
Jimmy Mac (aka Jummy)
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