Using Kiln dried fine for Hardwood flooring....


I was thinking of trying to save money on the premade hardwood flooring and just using pine strips (kiln dried) for flooring insted. I would get an air nailer to make sure the nails are deep enough, then stain and varnish.
Does this sound like a good idea, or what should I do insted?
Thank you in advance.
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Dave
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My residence.
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recommend it for your home. Its simply not hard enough for a decent floor.
Dave
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thanks for your feed back.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

easily; maybe OK in a low traffic airconditioned domestic environment and no worse than particle board for wear. Some of the pines are harder than some of the soft hardwoods. I have seen macrocarpa pine used as flooring and it seems to work OK. Hardness is largely a function of the closeness of the grain and the age of the tree.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Southern Yellow Pine is the only pine commonly available that is hard enough for flooring.
'Kiln dried' just menas the wood was dried in a kiln without regard to HOW dry. If you are talking about the wood sold for ordinary construction it is usually not dry enough for flooring. Anything that is, will probably cost almost as much as tongue and groove flooring.
--

FF


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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
>> I was thinking of trying to save money on the premade hardwood flooring >> and just using pine strips (kiln dried) for flooring insted. I would >> get an air nailer to make sure the nails are deep enough, then stain >> and varnish. >> >> Does this sound like a good idea, or what should I do insted? >>
Fredfighter Wrote: >Southern Yellow Pine is the only pine commonly available that >is hard enough for flooring. > >'Kiln dried' just menas the wood was dried in a kiln without >regard to HOW dry. If you are talking about the wood sold for >ordinary construction it is usually not dry enough for flooring. ?Anything that is, will probably cost almost as much as >tongue and groove flooring. > >-- FF
My sister has wide-board pine flooring which she had installed all over the first floor of her house more than 30 years ago, and which has held up beautifully under her kids. Reasonable care is the key to keeping it durable - like any wood floor. BTW, I saw T&G pine flooring (3 widths) for sale at a local flooring company last week. Didn't ask what kind of pine though.
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one of the most beautiful floors i have ever seen was a red pine floor, out of tongue and groove 4 to 6" wide planks. definitely a "shoes off" floor, and you still will have tolerate dings and dents. but do dings and dents ruin a floor? kind of depends on the style of your house.
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Considering the fact that T&G SYP can be bought for very little money, why would you attempt to "make" flooring ???
The last time I looked at syp flooring, it was under $2.00 a square foot.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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