Using a router as an edge jointer?

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Scott Brownell) wrote in message

OK, here goes: Practice, practice, practice. :-)
Our own Jeff Gorman had a nice way of approaching it. He said you should try to make the board concave. Assuming the length of the plane is not too much less than that of the board, you will be unable to do it. But in the process, you should have a board that is very close to straight (and it won't be convex).
Start your stroke towards the center of the board and proceed to lengthen your stroke a little at a time, until you are taking a full-length shaving. That should do it.
Chuck Vance
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Scott Brownell) wrote in message wrote: <snip>

It's my understanding that the point of planing the boards side-by-side is not to get uniformity along the length of the joint but rather to compensate for any deviation you have from a right angle. The idea is that you place the two edges together before planing. Then you flip one of the boards 180 degrees about its long axis so the planed edges come together. Even if you've planed a noticable bevel on each board, the sum of the angles will be exactly 180 degrees (i.e. will result in a flat panel). This will, in principle, work even for large deviations from 90 degrees. HTH.
Cheers, Mike

btw: I like your implication that neanders are more than just monosyllabic brutes. :-)
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I have used the straightedge method but with the router in the table. Used a flush trimming bit and let the bearing ride along the straight edge. Eliminates any chance of rotating the base. John
Leon wrote:

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Good basic points raised here Leon. I don't know why, but if you talk about jointing with a jointer, a lot of people will mention the length of the tables as crucial, but when talk switches to using router tables and a fence, the focus seems to be on getting the outfeed fence and the bit flush (when talking jointers this usually only comes up during fault finding discussions). Although important in their own right, such items are secondary to the fence length being appropriate for the job.
For those that want to challenge this statement, look at all the jointer posts, rarely, if ever, will anyone say ensure the outfeed table and cutters are level - its usually accepted as a "given". The router fence performs the same role
For a successful joint to be achieved on the router table, the length of the fence is important but often overlooked. Perhaps the focus is too tool centric, rather than process oriented.
Greg

are
edge
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Chip wrote:

Instead of using the router as a jointer, what about just using it to route a straight line, or better yet route a groove (full depth) between two boards. Clamp the boards down with a space of 1/8 to 1/4 inch less than the width of the straight bit. Then clamp a straight edge on one board to put the bit down the center of the space. Even if the router turns some as you move it, and even if the straight edge isn't perfectly straight you should still end up with the edges that are mirrors and fit together.
I've never used this method but I don't see why it wouldn't work. If anyone has used this method and found a problem, maybe they will comment.
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I have used an old drywall t-square and a flush trim bit that has the bearing on the top. This method has worked well many times that the shop was just too far to go for one last piece. I don't know if I would want to use this method as my primary method, but it can provide and acceptable edge for jointing. One thing I will point out is that it takes more clamping force that spring clamps can produce, and it doesn't seem to matter how many you use. DAMHIKT.
Howard

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Thanks to those who posted such great comments! When I first started reading the follow-up posts, I thought I raised a real sh*t storm again. POssibly I could have eliminated some of the tension by first announcing I am a Newbie (does that help lower the tension?). Simple question I thought. Great answers. Thank you.
I had learned about clamping the two pieces to be jointed together and running a plane down both at the same time. This way, even if not square to one another, they form complimentary angles. I guess this would be the same as the one follow-up about using a router vs. the plane.
Thanks again.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Chip) wrote in message

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Not sure how to explain this properly, but the one tip I didn't see mentioned that I do.
Mark the boards after laying out, first edge route (with the offset fence) good side up, next board edge with the good side down and so on. This method will washout any issues with the router not being perpendicular to the table.
Duane
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But it works only if the boards have been jointed flat on one face, and the opposite faces planed too. If the OP is able to face-joint a board, he can joint the edges with the same method.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 18:52:22 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Doug and Dave seem to have a small war going on. I use a "Job-Site" edge jointer all the time with my router. A basic router table with a modified fence does the trick for me. Run your fence halfway though the tablesaw taking off a mere 1/32" or so. Clamp it down on the table and edge joint to your hearts content.
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I do it all the time with excellent results. My router table has a split fence. When I want to edge join some boards, I slip an old hacksaw blade behind the outfeed fence and align the fence with the cutter. Works like a charm if the wood face has been planed or is reasonably flat.
HTH,
Vic

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