Using a circle cutter freehand

I know don't do it.
But I was planning on drilling a pilot hole though a wall. Then replacing the pilot drill with a long metal rod, so that two pilot holes would keep the rod straight.
I'd have to replace the first pilot hole I drilled out, so That I still had two when drilling the other side. Hole size is 5" and material is drywall on one side and some kind of fibreboard on the other.
Anyone tried this?
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Bill Stock wrote: | I know don't do it. | | But I was planning on drilling a pilot hole though a wall. Then | replacing the pilot drill with a long metal rod, so that two pilot | holes would keep the rod straight. | | I'd have to replace the first pilot hole I drilled out, so That I | still had two when drilling the other side. Hole size is 5" and | material is drywall on one side and some kind of fibreboard on the | other. | | Anyone tried this?
If you're talking about a fly cutter, then I'll be proud to nominate you for a 2007 Darwin Award (Woodworking Division).
If you're talking about a hole saw, then you may be able to use some type of drill guide with a long bit to drill both pilot holes.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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Yup... let's mount a bar with a sharp end onto a bigger bar with an attachment and mount the whole contraption and spin the sucker at 300 (the usual minimum speed on a drill press) and then feed it into a piece of material, which usually isn't clamped down and sell the whole killer tool combo for $ 9,99 to the great unwashed, who don't have a clue. People who SELL those things should be liable.
Better yet... let's screw one onto a radial arm saw!!!
I forgot who said this, but:
The difference between genius and stupidity, is that genius has its limits.
BTW.. does anybody here remember that triagular saw blade for a circular saw, so you could turn corners whilst cutting panels etc???
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Are you serious about this? That sounds too wierd to be true. Marc
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wrote:

It's true, I had one. I think it came as a freebie with something else. As I recall it went directly into the trash.
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I clearly recall TV ads. I'm not a bit surprised that product faded into obscurity...lawyers and all...
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I do! I do!. I would describe the blade as shaped like a shallow bowl or like the bell found on a fire alarm. It usually required removing or modifying the circular saw guard to be mounted. By varying the depth of cut and bevel angle of the saw, curves of different radius could be cut.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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Actual blade. It works.

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Robatoy wrote:
> BTW.. does anybody here remember that triagular saw blade for a > circular saw, so you could turn corners whilst cutting panels etc???
Had forgotten it till you jogged my memory with your post.
Got some swamp land in Arizona to talk about if you are a candidate for a triangular saw blade.<grin>
Lew
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Bill Stock wrote:

I am assuming here that you are talking about using a shallow can-shaped holesaw. They almost always use a 1/4" drill bit for a centering device. You certainly should be able to do exactly what you are talking about, considering your medium is drywall.
Drill a pilot hole thru both sides of the stud cavity .. .. replace the drill on the hole-saw assembly with a 6"-7" piece of 1/4" smooth rod .. .. place the 1/4" guide now attached to the hole-saw thru both guide holes, and drill away. A hole-saw will NOT be any hazard used in this manner drilling an aligned hole in drywall. People do it all the time for dryer ducts, dust collector ducting, etc.
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Sun, Jun 3, 2007, 7:56pm snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net (BillStock) doth posteth: I know don't do it. <snip> Anyone tried this?
Bill, Bill, Bill. You you already say you know not to do it. So why do it?
Something like that, that you've obviously thought out, you "never" ask if you should do it or not. What I'd do is, go ahead and do it, then post about it. Think I'd have ever got anyone to say using my power planer on a piece of wood in my runing lathe? I don't think so. But it worked great, altho it did take wood off a lot faster than I'd anticipated. Sure worked find for rounding off a sliglyly of balance, square chunks of wood.
For what i's worh, I think it'd work, and I'd be willing to try it, if I needed a hole drilled. On the other hand, I beleve one of my hole saws is about that size, so might not need to.
JOAT What is life without challenge and a constant stream of new humiliations? - Peter Egan
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another slick approach is a rotozip- or just buy the rotozip cutter and use it in a laminate trimmer or small router. set it up with a circle cutter/ trammel base and have at it. it'll do a very nice job on the drywall and fiberstuff, but not the studs.
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On Sun, 3 Jun 2007 19:56:22 -0400, Bill Stock wrote:

You mean one of the "fly cutter" type circle cutters?
I tried that freehand, once. It didn't work out too well.
I'd think that in drywall, which is quite soft, the pilot would enlarge the pilot hole as the cutter imparts a lateral force on the pilot (you can easily experience this by chucking up the cutter in your hand drill and spinning it at low speed). It might be less of an issue with a smooth rod, but I do think it would be a problem.
Can't you find a hole saw the proper size?
--
Art Greenberg
artg at eclipse dot net
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drilling a pilot hole though a wall
Hoe Depot sells a circle cutter designed for installing recessed lighting fixtures in drywall ceilings. But the Rotozip/trammel approach is also viable. I suspect your concern is to get the tow openings parallel one to the other (hence the idea of drilling the pilot hole through both surfaces in one go. If you use th trammel approach, this "one go" pilot hole should serve, but it might be better to use a smaller (1/8") bit unless you can replace the little RotoZip Trammel guide pin with a 1/4" guide.
(as someone else commented) Let us know how it goes.

drilling a pilot hole though a wall drilli(ng a pilot hole though a wall
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