Using a chainsaw?


Are there any classes, videos, books, etc. that explain how to properly use a chainsaw? I mean things that aren't obvious, such as how to cut an unbalanced tree so that it doesn't rotate and fall on you, how to prevent kickback, etc.
I've been thinking about this for years but never got around to it. I want to learn ahead of time, rather than waiting for a storm, tornado, etc. and then having to learn on the fly while I clean up my property.
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For $5.95, Lee Valley has a booklet that is a chain saw and crosscut saw training course, originally printed by the USDA Forest Service. It's excellent.
Tom Dacon

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That's the one I was going to suggest also. It's quite good.
--
Regards,

JT
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I don't know specifically, but technicalvideorental.com has got some great videos. If they have one on chainsawing, it's probably a good one.
Dave "not affiliated, etc" Hinz
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AL wrote:

If you contact your local USDA or forestry department they can often times direct you to a certification course with regards to chainsaws, logging, etc.. It may be something you want to look into. Watching things on a video as opposed to actually working with someone in the woods, showing you first hand may be worth the effort.
As with everything there are tips and trick you learn only with time but learning general guidelines, 20% wedge, 20% hinge, etc. as well as how to cut a leaning tree, as you said, are very important if you are going to do any amount of felling.
Cleaning up from a hurricane or tornado however can be a very different story. Trees can often be in a serious bind, loaded up with all sorts of multidirectional tension due to the storm and the way they fell/landed. These situations can be very dangerous to cut out as they are extremely unpredictable. We spent an entire year (nights and weekends) cleaning up following a major ice storm and cut some trees that did some really wild things getting them the rest of the way to the ground. If you are ever in this situation be very carefull and if you arent 100% positive what the tree is going to do, and dont have a clear getaway, dont cut it. Leave it ot someone else.
Mark
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. Trees can often be in a serious bind, loaded up with all sorts of

I cut mostly blow- downs on my 600 AC up in Northeast Texes.
The advice is to be followed. Have an exit route, unimpeded!
Regardss
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Learn from someone else!...when shit goes south sawing trees with a chain saw its all bad...you can't teach experience, start slow, have lotsa wedges, wear the gear, and be prepared to "run away"
Schroeder

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