Using 230V 1Ph 60Hz Machines in 220/240V Country

Dear All,
I'm sure this question may not be the first time appear in this forum However, I am not able to search for similar threads previously poste by other members of this very useful forum.
My question is : Can I use a Saw Bench (Table Saw) purchased from America with 230V power input in my country with 220/240V at 50h power supply? Facts: Normally, most machines of 3hp & above, produced fo America's market, use power input of 230V/405V at 60hz cycle o frequency. Some types of machines with carbon brush (esp. direc shaft motor) use universal motors ( can use 50hz or 60hz power input) Most machines powered by "Induction" motors (esp those using driv belts) are not using universal motors. Is it true ?
I appreciate whatever reply from you all..
Thank you
Sandingdust KUL, M
-- Sandingdust
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Sandingdust wrote:
> > My question is : Can I use a Saw Bench (Table Saw) purchased from > America with 230V power input in my country with 220/240V at 50hz > power supply?
Not at full power or on a continuous basis, there is simply not enough iron in 60 HZ motors to operate at 50 HZ for any length of time.
Lew
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wrote:

Single phase 230V power is compatible, although you're likely to have to rewire the connectors and switchgear.
If you're bringing it into Europe, you're likely to have to comply with the PUWER '98 regulations. These impose some very sensible requirements on guards and switchgear (NVR at least, ideally a proper starter and isolator. Certainly not one of those crappy US toggle switches). They also have some requirements on spin-down times, which sometimes need brakes adding to heavier machines. The UK HSE has a good website on these things.
There's a theoretical issue over frequency, where the eddy losses are higher at 50Hz than at 60Hz. This increases the heat dumped into the motor and for a motor whose output power is limited by heat build-up, then it'll still work fine, but you have to reduce the overall rating of it. This is a minor issue in practice. Although modern motors are "cheaply made" compared to 1950s design (which could equally well be termed "over-weight") you'll find that Chinese manufacture is designed for 50Hz anyway. As most hobbyist woodworking machinery runs at an easy duty cycle anyway, long-term heat build-up isn't as much of a problem as short-term over-current and simple Ohm losses in the windings.
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