Use wax on plane soles?

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I just read (http://tinyurl.com/4npj3 ) that you should put candle wax on the soles of bench planes to reduce friction. Does this work? What's a good way to apply the wax?
I imagine a surface coat of wax would prevent rust quite nicely.
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Jacobe Hazzard wrote:

Oh yeah, it works, It particular important on metal planes, which don't slide as well as wooden planes.
The traditional way is to scribble with a candle.
BugBear
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Candle wax or paraffin wiped on works well. Don't get fancy, just rub the candle around the sole and go for it. It does not prevent rust. I suggest you use a non-silicone based polish for that, or one of the commercial sprays. Of course, if you use it often, that works better than anything.
--

Greg



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On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 04:36:41 -0400, "Jacobe Hazzard"

Sort of. Wax is a good idea, but candle wax isn't the best. It's solid, so it's hard to apply and polish out. It's also soft, so it's likely to be sticky afterwards.
You'd be better off reading some of the interminable threads about waxing table saws, and using those recommendations. "Johnson's Paste Wax" seems favoured - it has a solvent in the tin so it goes on easily, and most of these have carnauba wax in them to make them harder in service.
--
Smert' spamionam

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How well does LV Waxilit work for metal plane soles?
- Daniel
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On 28 Oct 2004 09:25:24 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@netscape.net (Daniel) wrote:

No idea. I generally use Liberon's Black Bison wax because it's harder.
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wrote:

I agree. I use the same wax that I use on my table saw, joiner, etc. Works great. Amazing difference.
Bill
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You don't need to "coat" the sole with it, just write a few squiggles along the length with the wax. I picked up a box of canning wax from a craft store about a year ago and it looks like that will last me about 40 years - it was probably $2, IIRC.
And, it indeed seems to reduce friction noticeably.
Mike

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I use SC Johnson's wax on my planes. They glide effortlessly (well, almost) with a fresh coat of that wax on them.
David
Jacobe Hazzard wrote:

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Does this not get wax on the wood? The slightest trace of wax or silicone will play havoc with finishes
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Wax is NOT silicone. Wax will cause zero problems when applied and buffed on your jointer, table saw, planes, etc.
David
Battleax wrote:

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I wipe mine down with Boeshield. SH
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See Bob Key's idea about an oil wick for lubricating a plane while using it. I tried it. It works really well.
http://www.terraclavis.com/bws/benchacc.htm
I put camillia oil on my planes for storage using the Japanese wick applicator.
Bob

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I use a small block of beeswax. As others pointed out, you just need a few scribbles on the sole. It helps immensely in reducing the friction -- you will be surprised.
Of course this doesn't prevent rust and so you will occasionally want to use paste wax or similar for the entire plane.
Cheers, Nate
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I have been using baby oil in a ball of felt, placed in a tuna can- anyone see any problems with this. Sure slides nice, and I thought maybe it would prevent rust like camelia.
Bob
n snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Nate Perkins) wrote in message

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snipped-for-privacy@operamail.com (Bob) wrote:

None, if you remove the tuna first.
LD
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On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 00:39:06 GMT, Lobby Dosser

That's why you have a shop cat. Put down the can and in a few minutes all traces of the tuna will be completely gone. (And the baby oil should counteract the effects of the cat spit.)
--RC
If I weren't interested in gardening and Ireland, I'd automatically killfile any messages mentioning 'bush' or 'Kerry'
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snipped-for-privacy@TAKEOUTmindspring.com wrote:

LOL!
The cat's sitting right here. Now he's asking for tuna!

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On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 04:36:41 -0400, "Jacobe Hazzard"

just rub a little on.
I prefer paste wax. it takes a little longer to use, because you have to let it dry and buff it off, but for use in the shop it's fine. in my jobsite kit I keep a lump of beeswax.
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Why? I rub it on before storing, let the first two passes buff it for me when I use the plane. Could care less about unbuffed wax on the sides.
wrote:

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