use ros on edge of boards?

Hi all, I'm wondering... using the random orbital sander on the face side of boards seems whats it is made to do. When I use it to clean up the 3/4 inch thick parts of the board I always wonder should I be using another type of sander. What is the group's experience with this? Thanks in advance, John O'Toole
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My experience is that it's risky business. Real grabby and tough to control.
A quick run with a plane is my preference, second is a quick scrape, third is a 1/4 sheet Rockwell orbital.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"John O'Toole" wrote in message

I have no problem with it, but I do it with care, always keeping the hand that holds the board closer to the sander for stability (wear a leather glove on that hand if need be). Also, try putting the workpiece in your vice. The more stable the workpiece the more control you have over the ROS. If you have more than one edge to do, stack them, then put them in the vice.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 2/05/04
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm getting some mixed messages here. Your subject is edge of boards, in the body you say face side, then you talk about the 3/4" thick parts.
Are you asking about the wide flat face, or the edges (the narrow part) of the stock?
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10 Feb 2004 03:29:19 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (John O'Toole) wrote:

it helps to slow it down all of the way....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1/4" pad sander outfitted most of the time with 150 grit.
dave
John O'Toole wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (John O'Toole) wrote in

For the types of projects I do (one at a time, no production runs to speak of), a well-tuned hand plane or three gets them very close. Then a rubber sanding block (actually three - 120, 220, 320) touches them up. If it's needed.
If you are doing a kitchen full of drawers, doors and face frames, another, more mechanized approach may be in order.
Turning off the machines, and hanging the ear muffs on the band saw knob offers a quieter, more peaceful moment in the process.
Enjoy the process!
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I sometimes (actually quite a bit) sand the edge with a ROS with 150 grit. You need a light touch and good control. However, you will still get some rounding due to slight loss of control and the softness of the sanding pad. If I really need the edge square, I hand sand with sandpaper wrapped around a block of wood.
Preston

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.