URGENT Wire wheel on TS??? Safe??? Issues??

Page 1 of 2  
Folks -
Santa's elf needs to distress some redwood for keepsake boxes, and doing it with a wire wheel mounted on the lathe headstock to "sandblast" it seemed like a good idea... but there are some hazards..
I got to thinking, could I mount the wire wheel on the tablesaw arbor, with an appropriate zero or nearly zero clearance plate and "rip" my lengths of stock with the wheel projecting say, 1/4" above the table? I have board buddies to use for hold downs and I think I'd get a more consistent texture on the boards.
If the wheel is covered by the board, I'm using board buddies to hold the board firmly, and am wearing safety equipment, what might I be missing, other than the grey matter that I've been after for years?
The wheel is rated for 6000 rpm, the arbor runs about 4,000. Does this seem like an okay idea or will my last words be "hey y'all, watch this!"?
John Moorhead
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm not sure about the zero clearance plate. Wires tend to spread, and what looked like sufficient clearance during setup may not be when you get going.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
but you can bet that the clearance plate will be REAL clean.
martin caskey millers island, maryland
Roy Smith wrote:

...
arbor, with

...
when
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Could a wire wheel in a TS be any less safe than those moulding cutters.. you know the ones...with that windy humming sound... With the safety precautions mentioned previously, I really see nothing wrong with the concept. You can even set the depth of 'cut'. Age a little, age a lot.
And yet.....why does it 'feel' wrong?
They're kinda furry looking.. like a hairbrush...how could that hurt any one?
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dunno - what is the tangential velocity of an inch long steel needle flying off a 5000RPM 8" diameter wire brush?
scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

Maximum 8" diam x pi x5000 /60/12 = 174 fps The diameter of the hub is MUCH smaller than that. Consider a mass , <1 gram. What's it going to penetrate assuming it is flying in a perfectly linear fashion? (Of course the eye-ball could possibly be bothered by something like that, hence the face shield.) What are the odds of it flying off in one's direction as opposed to the other 359 degrees on the compass?
I can't believe I'm writing all this bullshit.
My apologies.
*G*
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dunno. But I can relate seeing a piece of straw embedded half-way through a living oak tree after a tornado, so I, personally, wouldn't try the wire brush on a tablesaw. (If I've done my calcs correctly, 100mph equates to 146 fps, so that 174 fps is pretty damn fast (circa 118mph)).
The hub on a 8" wire brush would be circa 5.5-6" in diameter (my 6" brush has a 3.5" hub). Call it 130fps still in the 90+mph range.
scott

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote: [major snippage]

yabbut, yabbut...there is hardly any mass. Where is the energy to penetrate anything going to come from?
At the risk of beating this to death, I remain
sincerely yours
Rob
*grinning*
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 23:21:59 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

Less than it is flying off my angle grinder wire brushes. Admittedly they _do_ penetrate flesh. So long as the shaft speed doesn't exceed rated wheel speed, then flung bristles aren't the problem.
I wouldn't use a wire wheel in a table saw, simply because it's an awkward arrangement. When I use a wire wheel I like to have it directly under my hand, not reaching over a couple of feet towards it. Using it in a table saw would make it impossible to control the downward force properly - unlike a sawblade a wire brush's force is almost entirely tangential from the top surface, not the lower edge, and so this is almost guaranteed to start throwing timber at you.
Makita make a tool specificallty for aging timber like this. It's a large, wide, handheld drum / brush sander.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy -
In my OP, I noted that I'd be using board buddies as hold down/hold in/kickback protection... This would solve the issue you've raised..
John Moorhead
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(Scott Lurndal)

I wouldn't use one on a table saw either, but that's because a drill motor will do a better job most of the time and the bench grinder will also. But... as to the dangers, well... pushing a piece of wood into a spinning wire wheel on a table saw is not really any different than using the wire wheel on a grinder. Directly under your hand would not be a good place for a wire wheel. It's going to continually try to push the piece upwards. At least on the table saw you have plenty of control by simply pushing down on the workpiece.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's a candidate for the "Understatement of the Week" award. :-)

Sounds a *lot* safer than using a lathe.

You didn't mention push blocks. I don't think I'd want my hands too close to that. Roll up your sleeves, too, and stand off to the side.
Make sure to blow the trunnions and adjusting mechanisms clean with compressed air after you're finished. Those wire wheels tend to lose bristles at an alarming rate.

Or maybe, "Here, hold my beer." :-)
Sounds ok to me, given enough safety precautions.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Before you start could you set up a video cam, Oh Just in case of course. My opinion: Those wire wheels come apart awfully damn fast, I am constantly cleaning up wire shards after using my bench grinder w/wire wheel. I do have an angle grinder that has a wire wheel attachement with it, maybe that would work for you. It's much safer. Got it at Martha Sears for about 30 bucks. Good luck and keep that camera rolling cause its all real TV
RICH aka Searcher1
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How can a wire wheel in an (hand-held ?) angle grinder be safer than in a table saw?
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I just can't fathom myself putting an outward expanding wire wheel down into my prissy TS.
Searcher1
Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

constantly
have
would
Just a word of caution.
I bought a sears angle grinder and a cup wire brush to clean up some metal. It was a small job. Just smooth off some surface discoloration. Just enough to make a dull surface shiny again, Not heavy rust or anything.
That Sears cup brush totally wore away. It not only threw bristles all over the place but the bristles themselves wore down to the nub. I have used makita before. They lasted at least twenty time longer than the Sears crap. I paid $15 for a wire cup brush and it wore out completely in less than an hour. My old makita brushes literally lasted for years and years of occaisional use. I would say at least 60 hours. And they were still good for many more hours.
I got the Sears angle grinder on a closeout and got a good price. I did not expect to use it that much. I didn't know that I was going to pay far more for supplies.
And the Sears angle grinder was harder to hold and control than the makita. You get what you pay for. Not just in the original tool, but in the supplies as well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have not even taken the wire cup out of the package, so THANK YOU for the warning. I am actually using the angle grinder on a gun safe that I am building and have had no complaints as of yet. Just by looking at the wire cup I thinks to myself, this looks pretty tough, and put it back in the box. The last I saw it it was still there. I really have no use for the wire cup. But, with you post, I thinks me will look for another brand. Thanks Searcher1

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 12:41:32 -0500, "Lee Michaels"
Yeah, they do that. These days I'm _very_ fussy about the brand of wire wheel I use on the angle grinder. I recently heard www.ohiobrush.com very highly recommended over in the welding ng.
For aging boards, I'd definitely use a hand-held grinder and move it over the board. I wouldn't think of using it in a tablesaw - it's just the wrong way to bring the two components together.
I'd also be inclined not to age the boards, but to make up the carcase and then age that.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yup, please have your survivors post the video.

These things have a max speed rating. The grinder has a speed rating. If A is greater than B, fine. If B is greater than A, don't do it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
you off?
Just how many keepsake boxes was Santa's elf planning on doing, anyway?
I think I'd start with a wheel chucked into a tailed handheld drill motor. The low angle grinder idea has appeal, but my DeWalt can be pretty aggressive, and thrilling to control.
Maybe dig out that face shield that you're 'sposed to have for the lathe work, too.
Patriarch, wondering if John ran this idea by Rose first...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.