Up-Cut Saw

What is an Up-Cut saw, how does it operate (I have a 1980 Rockwell Uni-saw, is it similar?), is an up-cut saw used similarly as a regular table saw, is a left hand up-cut saw preferred and why (as opposed to right hand, if such exists)?
Item: Whirlpool 1000 Left Hand Pneu. Up-cut saw (serial # 151839), 14" blade, 7.5 hp motor (3 ph), with 96" roller table. I suppose the motor can be changed for 220 usage. I don't know the age of this saw, but I suspect not more than 20 yrs old.
Is $200 to $300 for this saw, in working order, a reasonable deal? There are 3 of these saws available. Or should I pass on this? I have until Dec 27th to decide.
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On Wed, 20 Dec 2006 18:43:22 -0800, Sonny wrote:

I believe that that is a "Whirlwind" not "Whirlpool" and if you google that name (i.e. "Whirlwind saw") you'll find a bit of information about them. Other than that and that it's a $4000 saw I don't know anything about them other than what I find in that search.
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--John
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wrote:

According to that web-page this is an industrial cutoff saw. To me it would be worthless unless you are doing massive amounts of relatively small width cut-offs (i.e. building manufactured housing or something). Apparently the blade is below the table. You position the material and activate a pneumatic clamp to hold it then step on a floor mounted switch and the blade is brought up through the material producing the cut-off and then the blade goes back below the table, the clamp is released and you position the next piece of material - rinse & repeat.
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Thanks everyone. Apparently this is not something for me. It is a company selling assets, cheaply, so I have been checking out their stuff. Thanks again.
Sonny
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I've seen one of these in operation in NC. A fellow has a shop that does nothing but cut shelf-width sections out of larger sheets of MDF.
The "Wow factor" is significant but the owner/operator would agree that its not a general purpose tool nor the most accurate device available.
It appears that the benefit includes the fact that the "disappearing blade" allows a free flat table surface between cuts making removal of cutoffs and re-aligning stock a bit safer for the operator and helper(s) intent upon sawing as many pieces as possible in the shortest period.

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A company local to me makes them (Lauderdale-Hamilton, Shannon, MS). His version of an up-cut saw is a large blade chop saw, where the blade rises through the table. He also makes gang rip saws and other types of machines for the industrial woodworking industry.
$2-300 for one of his saws would be a steal.
Frank
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Sonny wrote:

If it actually works, that's $0.10 on the $$, so it would be a good value. But, unless you're going to try to resell it or have a need, if you don't know what it is, you undoubtedly don't have a use for it. :)
These are _production_ machines, designed for one specific purpose and are of no use (and can't be used) for anything else -- they're a cutoff saw for rapid, repetitive cutting of material to length. That's, it. To use it, you'll need 3-phase power and probably 408/440 at that. I'd have no illusion the motor is convertible to lower voltage (altho there's an outside chance it might be, I'd figure it minimal at best). On top of that, you'll have to have an industrial-sized supply of compressed air as they use pneumatic hold downs which are required, not optional, in order for the machine to operate. They are somewhat like a radial saw, except the blade is underneath the table and comes up (hence the name) and does not slide on an arm but simply rotates up to cut the material placed over it.
So, unless you're planning on going into the furniture or cabinet-making business in a big way, or simply want to see if you can maybe make a buck, I'd say you don't want one of these...
OBTW, it's Whirlwind that is the manufacturer, not Whirlpool...I didn't look, I suspect they have a web site although they're not set up for individuals/home shop-type users, so I don't know what they might have available...
HTH....
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