Unisaw info and value


I just saw an ad for a unisaw, either 36-955 or 35-957. I'll find out the exact one tonight but it looks like it is a 3hp right tilt with a 52" fence. I'm wondering if anyone has information on this model and the current worth. The ad claims it has never been used but it seems to not be a newer model. Asking price is $1200 but that seems a bit high for a used saw, even if it's never been "used".
Also, I'm not sure if I want to run a new 220 line for the saw. Does anyone know if it would be possible to use the same outlet as the dryer? Of course I'll build my own extension cord with the right plugs, and I'll make sure I tap into the 220v and not the 110v and I'll make it 12 gauge. 220 is 220, right? Shouldn't matter if the breaker is bigger than the saw needs as long as I use the gauge right wire, right?
Thanks in advance for the help.
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woodworker snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

That's not a bad price for a complete, as new Unisaw, or even a moderately new one. Assuming everything that's supposed to be there actually is. There's no warranty, usually, and you have to haul and assemble and set it up. A right tilt saw is not a problem.
I'm the wrong fellow to mislead you on the electrical.
I'd check the trunions, and make sure there's no concealed shipping damage. Those problems weren't unknown over the last five years or so.
Patriarch, owner of a 4 yr old LT 52" Bies...
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The purpose of the breaker is to protect the equipment on the circuit.
If the breaker is too big, then it means the equipment, in this case motor, could attempt to run more amps than designed, e.g., when bogged down trying to rip 8/4 maple.
The wire is not always the first thing to break when an overload situation occurs.
Check if the motor has a thermal overload protection. If it does not, I would not recommend using this with a much larger dryer breaker. The motor would burn out before the dryer circuit breaker would trip.
The wire for the dryer is lightly to be two conductor and a ground. A dedicated circuit for the saw would also use two conductor and a ground type of wire.
Dave Paine.

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Wrong.

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Tyke wrote:

CW is a bit more abrupt, but the breaker is to protect the circuit, not the tool. Any tool protection needed must be done by the breaker on the tool. Otherwise, ever in-house circuit would need a tiny breaker for those times when only one light bulb was lit, among other reasons. The breaker is there to prevent melted cable insulation and the problems that causes.,,fires.
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Tyke wrote:

wire from overheating and causing a fire should a short circuit occur. US electric code calls for a 15 amp breaker on 14 gage wire, and a 20 amp breaker on 12 gage wire. The saw should carry its own protection in the form of a thermal cutout in the saw motor, AND, an alert operator who shuts the saw off should it stall or begin to smoke and smell bad. One backs up the other. I would expect such a saw to work well on a 12 gage 20 amp 220 volt circuit as long as you don't stall the motor during a difficult cut.
David Starr
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On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 23:18:06 -0400, David Starr

What he said.
How would a breaker protect a device if multiple devices are operating at the same time, on the same circuit?
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The ad claims it has never been used but it seems to

That's good news, and probably worth a bit more considering the current value engineering by Delta.

If it's in good shape, as advertised, and ALL USA made, jump on it.

Sure you can. Check the specs on the saw, but if is 3HP it most likely runs on a 20 amp circuit and probably uses a 15 AMP NEMA 6-15P plug. Most dryer circuits would qualifiy ... check the breaker.
Of course I'll build my own extension cord with the right plugs,

Yep. All you need to be in code for the saw is the two hot leads and the ground. Cap the neutral off in the old receptacle for future use. Personally, I'd use 10 ga for the extension cord, but that's just me.
Shouldn't matter if the breaker is

As long as the saw is indeed 3HP and at least a 20A breaker, you will be fine ... but do check the specs on the motor because if it is not a 3HP, that could change.
--
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Last update: 8/29/06
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woodworker snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

If the saw is as described, that seems like a good price. Look on ebay & see what people are willing to pay. I sold my little used ~3 year old 52" Bies unisaw on ebay because I was moving across the country & got only slightly less than what new ones were going for. AND the guy drove nearly 400 miles to pick it up!
Dan
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Dan wrote:

Also if the situation is as it sounds (saw & dryer will be in the same location) I'd probably install a 2nd box next to the dryer one with the correct outlet for the saw. For that matter, you could likely install that 2nd box some distance away if needs be. And of course don't run both at once! If you're not sure about the electrical part you should probably call an electrician though.
Dan
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For clarification, the dryer is in the house and the saw will be in the garage. I will create a 50' (or less) extension cord out of 12 gauge romex wire and will probably use wire rated for underground. I am renting the house so I cannot make modifications to the electric which is causing a huge problem since there is no 220v in the garage. Safety is first so I'll do whatever I need to make it safe, or I wont do it.
Final question, I can get a brand new unisaw with 52" fence for $1550 at woodworker's supply. Is there something better about a platinum edition that makes it better than that saw??
Dan wrote:

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I would go with #10 minimum for 50' of cord for a table saw. If you are going to the trouble of burying it, why not cpcv conduit first and #8 wire?
Do it right the first time and you'll likely find it was worth while later.
wrote:

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I would do 10 AWG for a 50 foot run personally.
Brian Elfert
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If it's this one - I'd jump on it
(Amazon.com product link shortened)"8013 http://www.epinions.com/hmgd-Shop_Tools-All-Delta_Platinum_Edition_Unisaw_10__tilting_Arbor_Saw_36_955/display_~full_specs
Can't find anything on the 35-957 model.
Bob S.

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