Unisaw Electrical Plug

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Can anyone who owns a Delta Unisaw confirm whether it comes equipped with a 6-20R electrical plug attached? The dealer doesn't seem to know the nomenclature, and I don't feel like driving there.
I wired the garage with an 80 amp 220v sub-panel last year, and installed 6-20 outlets in several locations for other equipment. There is a 20 amp 220v circuit allocated for the saw.
http://www.thevideodoc.com \Images\6-20R.jpg
Thanks,
Greg G.
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Mine came wired with a plug that fits into the outlet you show. I bought that very same receptacle at Home Depot and wired it to my sub panel on it's own dedicated circuit (it sounds like you did that as well). The plug on the saw has one round ground pin and two flat horizontal pins. Home Depot also sells heavy duty 220 V extension cords (9' max) in case you need one...
-m
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Mike Pio said:

Thanks, Mike. I was hoping that was the case. I have seen a vast array of twist-lock and mobile home connectors cobbled onto machinery over the years, so wasn't sure. But no, don't need no steenkin extension cords... ;-)
And before anyone else pitches in, this would be the 3HP version. The 5 HP requires a 30A receptacle and heavier (10g) wiring.
Thanks,
Greg G.
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"Greg G." wrote in message

IIRC, the plug that comes standard on the 3HP Delta Unisaws is a NEMA 6-15P.
Rated for 15amps, it will fit into a15 amp, 6-15R receptacle, as well as a 20 amp, 6-20R receptacle, should you decide to make a jumper or extension cord.
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Swingman said:

Thanks KC!
I'm surprised they use a NEMA 6-15P on a saw they rate at 18amps. (Depending on which version of the "specs" you go by.) They recommend a 20 amp breaker and 12g wire. Either way, my outlets will accept either plug.
SWMBO is hinting that it might be possible to acquire a demo Unisaw w/50" Bies fence this winter. Not quite sure how I would fit it into a 2 car shop and still work there, but the resale value of a used Unisaw is way above other brands, and there are a million accessories available. I'm tired of cheap tools, particularly my tablesaw, and I've been drooling over this one for years. Cry once...eh? The 50" Beis fence sure would be nice, but man does it eat up real estate. Since you have one, are the rails one piece, or can they be shortened without a hacksaw?
Thanks,
Greg G.
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"Greg G." wrote in message

If I am not mistaken, the NEMA 6-15P plug is actually rated for 20 amps.

Unless things have changed drastically, based on what you say above, you should be able to immediately 'plug and play' with a 3 HP Unisaw.

I have the 52" Uni Fence (with an additional Uni-T-fence aftermarket face, which I wouldn't trade for anything, that makes it _much_ more versatile than a Beis). One of the best $80 I've ever spent and would do it again in a heartbeat.
The Unifence only has one rail (front, with no back rail).
IMO, order the full monte then just cut off what you don't need. But you may be surprised at what you can stuff in a two car 'shop'. My shop is only 18 x 18 and the table saw and my main work bench are dead center, both acting like a combination large table/table saw with outfeed table.
I've always been glad I resisted the small shop mentality and decision to not cut back. You can always trim the rail, fence and outfeed table to suit your situation after the fact.
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Swingman said:

Hmmm... According to the NEMA picture chart I have, the 6 generally denotes 220volts, and the 15 denotes the amperage. A quick spec search on Leviton's site claims a 15 amp rating for a 6-15R. Code prohibits installing a 15 amp receptacle on a 20 amp circuit. Doesn't matter to me either way - I doubt that, other than at start-up, it will ever draw that much current in this shop. I don't cut 2 1/2" thick hard maple - can't afford it! The gas and oil companies are getting all of my wood money...

Yup, and even if I couldn't, it's a five minute job to swap out a receptacle.

I have contemplated both fences, the Beis being the old reliable, the Uni being it's fancy knock-off with sliding/flippable rails. Never heard anything negative about either. I'm big on jigs and fence mountable "stuff", so the Uni would probably be more appropriate for me. It just happens that the "discounted" saws come with the Beis. I wish it came with thru-holes for mounting accessories, however. (Yea, I have a drill...) I have no personal experience with either, so hindsight is limited.
I have often wondered, however, how you use the Uni Fence on the left side of the blade, with that "stop" resting on the table surface...

Similar setup here - about 19"x19". But it's still pretty crowded. I built a 2 1/2" thick, 30" x 72" workbench the same height as my current table saw, but now see that the Unisaw is ~1.5" shorter. So now I have to whack off the table trestle to match. And, of course, it can't be from the bottom, 'cause I store 2 Walker hydraulic jacks underneath the bottom shelf. I built a large, fold-down torsion box outfeed table that should adapt easily, however. The main bench is a left side table saw extension, as I got tired of having to clean off the bench to use the saw. And considering that the shop gets used for woodworking, woodturning, the occasional engine/auto transmission overhaul, general staging for home repair materials, electronic tinkering, projection TV repair, etc., it can get pretty crowded...
I still cut down 4x8 sheets with <gulp> a circular saw before trimming on the table saw. I was hoping to eliminate that aggravation - even if I have to feed sheets from an opened garage door (in the dead of winter - $10.00 worth of heat lost per opening...).
But I REALLY resist the temptation to saw off anything that can't be put back on seamlessly. We plan to move in the next few years - and the next place WILL be large enough to hold all the Big Tools. I don't care about 3 bathrooms, 3 floors of wasted space, 4 bedrooms or huge "great rooms" - we never use any of them. All I want is an office, media room, and a 32x32+ shop. All SWMBO wants is an office, kitchen and a bedroom. And we both want 10+ acres of land, away from this stinking city, with no neighbors - other than wildlife.

It's the after the after the fact that concerns me... ;-) And... I don't believe I have what it takes to violate a nice 50" fence with a hacksaw. I hate the 28" fence I have now, I'm always needing a couple more inches... (and what man doesn't...)
Greg G.
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I'm not sure whether the 6-15 is "rated" at 20 amps or not. I know they are keyed that way. However, on the 120V side, same situation, I have $1000 that says if you go into your kitchen, where, by code, there are two 20 amp circuits, you will find nothing but "15 amp receptacles" (the two vertical bars), even though the plug pattern for a "20 amp receptacle" is one vertical and one horizontal. The NEMA 20 amp receptacles have a dual slot on one side to accomodate both 15 and 20 amp plugs.
The keying is the key, not the current rating. And in any event, why would it be a problem putting a "15 amp receptacle" on a 20 amp circuit. NEC would be much more concerned with putting a 20 amp receptacle on a 15 amp circuit. You don't want to be plugging in equipment to a 15 amp circuit that is going to draw more than 15 amps.
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LRod

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LRod said:

Well, we have 20 amp receptacles in our kitchen as required by local code. (The obvious giveaway being the T-shaped hot.) As do the 20 amp receptacles in the garage - in addition to the required GFCI breakers. But I do not deny that most likely, most homes have 15 amp sockets, 'cause that's what the contractor bought a bulk box of. Codes vary as do inspectors. ($$$) You may mail my $1000 to:
But as far as the difference between the current capacity of the two, it *may* make no difference - probably depends of the vendor's individual design. But the contact area of the socket, it's connector wiping pattern, and general bulk of the internal conductors makes a difference. I haven't poured through my copy of the NEC to see what they "recommend", however. The local inspector told me a 20 amp circuits required 20 amp rated receptacles - and that's all that matters to me, because he is the ultimate authority. :-o

Because the internal conductor size and blade contact patch inside the socket determines the ultimate current carrying capacity of the receptacle. In this bean-counting world, this makes sense to me. I have noticed that the bonding straps between the two outlets on a 120v 20amp duplex receptacle are heavier than on a 15 amp duplex receptacle. The socket has to carry as much current as the wiring, albeit for a much shorter distance. And any non-secure connection such as a plug and socket is an inherently more resistive connection than proper in-wall wiring. That is why wall sockets and plugs get hot before the wiring. Smaller, more resistive connections.
Hey, don't shoot me, I'm only the messenger. ;-)
Greg G.
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Heh, heh.
Keep watching that mail box...
--
LRod

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[top posted for your convenience]
I was that rarity in Jacksonville, government employee not involved in any way with the Navy...not that there's anything wrong with that.
OB is still nice and quiet, although Daytona is going condo and up at an alarming rate. You'll probably have to go west of the Mississippi if you want to find mountains to escape it all. We had land in Western NC in the '90s--almost moved there when I retired, now I'm glad we didn't. Every time we go back there we're blown away by all the "people from Atlanta" who've moved in.
A guy I woeked with in Jax still lives there. He says the transformation from the '70s to now was remarkable (mostly good), so you were there at a lot better time than I was.
Of course my Florida history goes back a lot farther than that--I was here before the Revolution. Ocala one light? Ha, I remember when 8th Street in Miami was Tamiami Trail, not Calle Ocho. Sadly, I also remember "white only" signs on water fountains and "colored" on bathrooms.

--
LRod

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Where do you find something that gets used in a normal residence with a 20 amp plug?
15 amp receptacles get used because nothing in 99% of all houses uses 20 amps. The wiring is 20 amp because it services multiple outlets.

Is using the bonding straps on an outlet to continue the circuit even code legal? A good electrician will run a pigtail to the outlet and not use the bonding strap. I wired my own house and used pigtails.
Brian Elfert
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Brian Elfert said:

Residence? Nothing that I'm aware of - they use a NEMA 5-15P. My observation was that the internals and bonding straps are heavier.
Why do they put a 15 amp connector on a saw that draws 18 amps? Why is the sky blue?

Sure, I understand. But local Authority Has Jurisdiction. So I do what they say.

That's nice, dear. It's legal here. The bonding strap supplies current to the other outlet as well - just the thing for those 20 amp appliances. :-o
As I said, AHJ. :-\
Greg G.
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"Greg G." wrote in message

Because codes specify the "receptacle" requirements, not the male plug.
... think about it. ;)
Don't worry ... the NEMA 6-15P "male" plug will handle the 20 amp circuit, and the UniSaw startup amperage, with no problem whatsoever.
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Swingman said:

I know that! I was being sarcastic... ;-)
Greg G.
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wrote:

Would you like my address to send me the $$$ ALL my outlets in my kitchen are the 20amp models and take BOTH 15 and 20 amp plugs BTW the code says if it's the only yoke on a 20 circuit then it must be a 20 amp but if it's a DUPLEX outlet ( 2 yokes ) then they can be 15 amp each on a 20 amp circuit
William.....

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"Greg G." wrote in message

Acutally, it is just the opposite. The Beis is much easier to "jig up" than the OEM UniFence. Adding the aftermarket "Uni-T-Fence" to the UnFence assembly is what gives you more flexibility, IMO, than a Beis, but it is definitely an extra cost you would want to factor in.
http://www.ttrackusa.com /
The Beis that comes with the UniSaw is as much fence as anyone could want, so if your best deal is with the Beis, go for it and you will be ahead of the game moneywise.

?? No such thing on mine? ;)
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Swingman said:

OK - I thought the Uni had tracks and grooves for that purpose. I see it's not very friendly to jigs that ride over the fence rail.

I have always been impressed by it's sturdiness and heft. But not having used the Uni, it's hard to make a personal comparison.

This thing:
http://www.thevideodoc.com/Images/fencethingy.jpg
I see now, however, that it doesn't stick out past the fence body, but that you have to remove the fence rail and swap it and the fasteners to opposite sides. A PITA, but not something you do often, I assume.
Greg G.
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"Greg G." wrote in message

Ahh ... no, that never gets in the way of anything as it is under, and does not extend past, either side of the slide assembly.
Very easy, and takes about 30 seconds, to move the Uni-Fence to the opposite side, less if you do it often. But IME, there is rarely a need to do so.
So rare, AAMOF, that I can't remember the last time I _needed_ to do it.
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All the electrical stuff accurate. 3 HP comes with a NEMA 6-15 plug and will work appropriately with a 20 AMP receptacle.
You can always get a 30" in either a Bies or a Unifence if you are space constrained and don't want to fool with cutting off a rail. Unifence has more neat features; Bies is a little tougher. Both great.
Frank
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