Unisaw arbor bearing replacement

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On 4/6/2013 1:32 PM, dpb wrote:

Yeah, what I meant to indicate was not solid 1" thick.
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On 4/6/2013 3:17 PM, Leon wrote:

Actually to be anal about it, using an iron weight calculator, a 1/4" thick by 27 x 40 would weigh about 70lbs. Add 50% more for the webbing and you are at about 105 lbs.
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27 x 40 would be the dimension of the top w/both wings attached. I would've thought that would be closer to 200lbs or more.
I Checked the thickness of my top. Took a 6" C-clamp, screw side underneath, and snugged it up on a flat area (not on webbing). Wrapped a piece of tape around where the clamp's male threads entered the female thread clamp portion. Removed clamp, screwed the thing until the the tape just hit the female portion and measured the distance between the swivel pad and the stationary thingy and got a distance of 3/8"!
The top by itself (no wings attached) measures 27 x 20, it's 3/8 thick, the edge is 1 5/8 wide, the edge and webbing are roughly 5/16 thick.
I'm curious to know what the weight is if you plugged those figures in your 'cast iron calculator' :)
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RE: Subject
Not to get the cart before the horse, but to properly install the new bearings, you are going to need an arbor press.
You are going to take the arbor and bearings to the arbor press, not the other way around.
Lew
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What he said. If you are too rough on the cast iron yolk that holds the bearings, you will break the casting.
DON'T ask me how I know that. Be Very careful with the amount of force you use.
--
Jim in NC


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Actually I won't. I'll be using a bearing separator/puller to remove the bearing nearest the blade and I believe I can use it to slide the new bearing home as well. I've had a set of these for about 5 yrs, used the small one once, the neighbor has used them a couple of times. They work great.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R25zsdW8Ewo

Here's a photo of a Unisaw arbor shaft with the bearing in place:
http://web.archive.org/liveweb/http://www.sawcenter.com/arbor_2.gif
Also, I WILL NOT be changing mine out in the manner this guy did either ;-) http://lumberjocks.com/Bothus/blog/11219
always nice to learn from other's mistakes...
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??? http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/brinnel?s=t&path=/
Perhaps if you had researched this as much as I have you would realize just how silly your reply is. No idea how old your are but perhaps with a few more orbits around the sun you'll come to the realization that there's ALWAYS more than one way to skin a cat, (or push on a bearing).

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"Lew Hodgett" wrote:

"Spalted Walt" wrote:

Has nothing to do with "brinelling" as applied to ball bearings.
SFWIW, "brinelling" is a term unique to the ball bearing industry. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

I got paid real money to design ball bearing systems back in the days when I worked in the engineering department or a rotating equipment manufacturer.
What part of ball bearing design and application would you like to discuss?
As far as age is concerned, I was here before the first A-bomb was dropped.
What is your excuse?
Lew
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Lets discuss the part where I ASSUMED it was common knowledge that the proper way to press a bearing on a shaft was to apply pressure to the inner race ONLY. Never the seal and never the outer race.
--> parts diagram posted in alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking What I failed to mention was (for the sake of brevity) is the bearing puller, when flipped over, is flat (not concave) on the back side.
http://www.harborfreight.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/m/image_21569.jpg
I am planning to use this FLAT side of the puller to push Item #143 (steel spacer) which will be butted up against ONLY the inner race of the bearing Item #142.
You obviously ASSUMED I would be removing the entire arbor assembly ("You are going to take the arbor and bearings to the arbor press") when in fact I'm probably going to remove the shaft only, for a number of reasons.
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Here's a link to the actual Delta pdf for the 'binary challenged'...
http://goo.gl/hVcCv
which is the Google shortened version of this:
http://servicenet.deltamachinery.com/Products/GetDocument?docName=CS4K171-2.tif&docPath=http%3A%2F%2Fdocuments.dewalt.com%2Fdocuments%2FEnglish%2FExploded%2520Art%2FDelta%2FCS4K171-2.png&productIdB865&productType 09&documentId0165
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"Spalted Walt" wrote:

That gets half the job done.
BTW, most folks know what ASSUMED gets you, perhaps you have forgotton.
STFWIW, there are more 6203 bearings made than all the other ball bearings combined.
Your renewal parts price is about right,
Probably could have walked into any bearing supply house and bought a couple across the counter and saved the freight.
Lew
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Shipping was free and they arrived today!
http://www.ebay.com/itm/6203-2NSE-Nachi-17x40x12-C3-17mm-40mm-12mm-Japan-Ball-Radial-Ball-Bearings-/130572904784
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"Mike Marlow" wrote:

It is very easy to brinnel a ball bearing if proper installation techniques are not followed.
If the installation load to seat the ball bearing gets applied from the outer race, across the balls to the inner race, or vice versa, brinnelling is almost guaranteed to happen.
The load rating of the ball bearing is for a bearing operating at rotating RPM and load, not the static load that happens when the bearing is improperly installed.
As far as tapered roller bearings are concerned, have been in a couple of Timken plants but never got involved in a design application so can't comment on tapered roller bearings from an engineering stand point; however, the installation methods are totally different and would not be subjected to the installation brinelling experienced by ball bearings.
Lew
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On 4/6/2013 6:40 AM, Spalted Walt wrote:

Using a "very" straight edge, make a long line on the top of the saw with the straight edge on both sides of the blade. Makes putting the top back on much easier.
Removing the bearing with out removing the top is silly to even attempt.
Here is a complete restoration method detailed in pictures:
http://wiki.vintagemachinery.org/How%20to%20Properly%20Clean%20a%20Unisaw.ashx
for your bearing, go to:
http://www.owwm.org/viewtopic.php?f=1&t 322
and then order from: http://www.accuratebearing.com/
You need to order from Lynne using the correct numbers.
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So you're saying Jesper Gronvaldt is full of crap in his detailed description of how to do it without removing the top,
http://www.woodcentral.com/bparticles/unisawbearings.shtml
along with others that have done it quite successfully?

A complete restoration is not needed on my Unisaw. It looks and runs as if it were manufactured a year ago (although it's 12 yrs old) and has relatively few hours on it. I merely noticed the distinct sound of dry clicking bearings while spinning the blade with the belts removed. From what I've read Delta is notorious for using low quality Chinese bearings and charging $25 bucks for the same poor quality replacements.

Sorry, Lynne lost a sale. I expect them to arrive today or tomorrow, USPS priority mail. Oh, and the correct number/size is 6203. At $5.55 a piece with free shipping, I doubt Lynne could have beat the price on 6203-2NSE Nachi bearings anyway.
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On 4/8/2013 9:05 AM, Spalted Walt wrote:

Yes I do... I have completely restored two Delta saws from the ground up and I am very familiar with the process.
I did a 34-450 Unisaw(1971) and a (1966) 34-350 12/14" Tilting Arbor Saw.

Sounds like a great deal... Do you think the bearing that came in the saw cost $5.55 each when the saw was built ?
Didn't you wonder why the folks at the Saw Center did it that way ? Hint: They do it for a living.
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Sorry, but I trust Steve Shanesy's judgement (of Popular Woodworking) on this more than yours.
Do yourself a favor and watch this informative Delta sponsored video of how the 'Pros' replace arbor bearings at Popular Woodworking and then get back to me on the importance of "taking the arbor assembly to a machine shop for bearing removal and replacement because they will have the proper tools to do it correctly."
http://www.popularwoodworking.com/video/delta-unisaw/video_delta_unisaw_restoration_part_ii
You can skip ahead to about the 4 minute mark if you're pressed for time.
Yes, he has the top removed, because he's doing a COMPLETE restoration on a vintage 1944 Uni. Pay particular attention to the way he drives the shaft out of the arbor bracket and puts the new bearing on.

Are you serious? I'd guess Delta paid closer to $.75 ea buying in bulk from their Chinese bearing importer.
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Pat Barber wrote:

"Spalted Walt" wrote:

Buy them books, they eat the covers.
Good luck.
Lew
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Thanx
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On 4/6/2013 6:40 AM, Spalted Walt wrote:

I should have mentioned that a Unisaw weight is 380 lbs trimmed out.
The top is heavy and should be moved by two people for safety and common sense reasons.
I would take the arbor assembly to a machine shop for bearing removal and replacement because they will have the proper tools to do it correctly.
Screwing up the install will screw up both the bearing and the arbor shaft.
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