Unintentionally discovered a woodworking tip.

Well, sort of. It involves loading and unloading plywood and stock from a trailer.
Last night I completed the last step of the shop move: moving all the unused plywood, maple, hickory, and other stuff. It was maybe half a dozen sheets of plywood and about 200bdft of stock. When I got to the old house, I discovered that I didn't have my gloves. This was annoying because it was cold. I'm confident that I could have moved all of it without gloves and not gotten any splinters. But I would have had to go a lot slower.
After complaining to my wife about the situation, she suggested rubber gloves. You know the type, the thick yellow rubber ones swmbo uses to do the dishes. They're thicker than latex surgical gloves, but thin enough to feel what's happening. I stretched them over my hands and proceded to move wood. I was surprised by how good they were. They kept my hands warm (probably too hot in the summer), prevented splinters, and provided an extra rubbery non-slip grip.
I plan to fix the car with them this weekend.
brian
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brianlanning wrote:

Expen$ive ! Compare the price of them to the gloves at your FLAPS.
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Actually, there's little hotter in warm weather and little colder when you sweat in them in cold. Sort of like the nomex suits we flyers had to wear. For EMS, they make cotton liners to absorb the sweat in winter, but even then there's a lot of numb when working a car accident in the snow.
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Oh you whoos. What the hell is a splinter or two or three? Real woodworkers...

Actually, I have recently taken to wearing latex gloves for a lot of jobs that I never did before. I use gloves when painting now - imagine not having to deal with tinted hands in your professional life... I use latex gloves now for auto mechanics repairs. Imagine not having all of that grease under your fingernails and in the cracks of your skin.
As un-manly as gloves sound, I've come to appreciate the benefits of them. Now I just have to find the right glove compound for the stuff I do.
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Latex is quickly broken down by oil based products. I use nitrile gloves as they are unaffected by the oil and are a little better for punctures. I agree that they are nice for not having to clean my hands with a brillo pad after changing the oil in the truck or working on some greasy, grimey part that needs replaced on it. Another use I have found is when I am in the kitchen carving the turkey or boning off a chicken.
Allen
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Man, the thought of a plywood splinter coming through that plastic glove gives me shivers. No thanks, that's what leather gloves are for.
Agree with the other comments about using latex/nitrile gloves while doing "dirty" work -- greasy fingernails are OK if you aren't having to brief the higher ups or customers, not so much so if that is on your calendar the Monday after changing out the brakes on the tractor over the weekend.
... snip
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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In the last 10 years or so nitrile gloves have become very popular with automotive mechanics and in other occupations with similar exposures & tool use. The nitrile gloves cost about twice what latex gloves do, but they last maybe 4 to 6 times as long, being both physically stronger and more resistant to chemicals. Plus, some people are allergic to latex, so far I've never heard of allergies to nitrile.
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You are of course, correct sir. I took the lazy way out and used the old standby and somewhat familiar term "latex" in a generic sense. I've not gotten off my duff and purchased any nitrile gloves yet, however I had read of their superiority over real latex gloves. My bad on both counts.
Correction appreciated.
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Walmart is even carrying the nitrile gloves over in the automotive section... Cheap ...
I use latex for all sorts of things but the nitrile is mucho better for some things...much tougher.
http://gss-store.com/category/glovesdisposable.nitrilegloves /
Mike Marlow wrote:

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Mike Marlow wrote: (snip)

Speaking of "un-manly" equipment, I've become extremely attached to a set of inexpensive-but-decent knee pads. They're great for jobs on the floor, under sinks etc. Allow me to bounce up and down during a project like a teenager. I call them my "old man pads", but in truth they are "smart, comfortable man - pads" Highly recommended!
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Mike Marlow wrote:

Imagine how popular you are at the Swarfega and Lava Hand Soap factories!
FoggyTown
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There are some gloves you can get with a latex palm/fingers. They work pretty well for moving wood and keep your grip on slick items. Menards has them (other places might, just look around.)
Puckdropper
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Consider also the gloves used by masons. They're usually cotton with a stubbly, non-slip rubber coating on the palms/fingers side only. They're good in hot weather, okay in cold. You can buy them by the sackful at the neighborhood big box store.
J.
brianlanning wrote:

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