Unexpectedly handy tools

Page 3 of 4  


However did you cope before buying it?
;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Damn, I saw that one coming.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<...snipped...>
"Not Just For Woodworking" but one of the handiest things I've purchased in the last few years was an inexpensive ratcheting screwdriver, the type that takes regular 1/4" hex bits. LOTS easier for my aging wrists and hands to use, lots less to carry around for household repairs, and when the business end gets worn out, just throw it away and pop in a new one.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 04 Jul 2006 01:05:24 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote:

Are you talking about a "Yankee" screwdriver, or something different? If different, do you have a link to an example? TIA
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Rockler used to have a T shaped driver where the base of the upright is the pointy end and the cross bar is the handle. The cross bar also holds a selection of bits. They had a special on this for $5 a few years back and one of them sits in a drawer beside me as I type. Another one resides in the truck. Fits in a pocket with room for change and Real Handy. Does forward-fixed-reverse. They don't seem to carry it now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<...snipped...>

Not a yankee, just a screwdriver with reversible ratchet built into the handle. Most do have storage for bits also built into the handle like a yankee though. I don't have a URL handy but try googling for a Stanley 68-010. The one I use is somewhat shorter than this model.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 04 Jul 2006 13:21:00 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote:

Thanks, I'm going to look into that.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I've had one without the ratchet for over 15 years now - now idea who is the manufacturer. But it fits all the bits, including Torx, and lives in the 'travels in the truck' tool box all of the time.
It's a keeper, all right.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've got one with the ratchet. Don't always use the ratchet, but when I have to drive some big screw by hand, the ratchet with the addition of a ratcheting wrench driving the bit is invaluable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Similar to the one that LV added to its inventory in July. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pS912&catQ&ap=1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Even better, that one goes on the list for next Lee Valley order [and there is little doubt there will be a next order].
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not exactly the same as the one I bought from Lee Valley about 10 years ago, but parts of the bits that protrude do have hexagon sides which are very handy in conjunction with a ratchet wrench. I'd say those two tools are the most used out of all the hand tools I own. I'm sure it will be a purchase you'll never regret.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
How about a 6" steel ruler, graduated in 1/32. Also a mechanical pencil, like a pentel 7mm or 5mm HD lead; clipps in your shirt pocket. Always reasonably sharp for most purposes, handy as the shirt pocket itself. Now sharpener needed
Bobby Lee Chandler, AZ, USA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

shirt
Rulers have been mentioned several times. I would add that I love my hook rules. I have a 12" and 24", purchased cheap at hartville tool ($4 and $6 respectively). That little hook makes all the difference in the world for repeated accuracy in measuring.
Hear here on the pentel pencils. The cheap knockoffs are an incredible value. I just bought a 12 pack of 5 mm pencils that had metal tips and erasers for $7 at Office depot. I'll sprinkle them throughtout the shop and hope not to lose all of them in the first month.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Kreg Mini pocket hole kit
--
I was punching a text message into my phone | Reed Snellenberger
yesterday and thought, "They need to make a | rsnellenberger
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My second pocket calculator that works and displays actual fractions.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cheap set of Calipers with a dial indicater. I paid about $20 for them and use them almost every day.
Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Being a machinist, calipers, micrometers and indicators are a part of daily life. I do have a couple of calipers and an indicator or two at home though I have never found a use for them when doing wood.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CW wrote:

I worked for a while as a machinist's helper. I don't do that anymore, but I have both metal and woodworking tools in the shop. I have pretty much full crossover- that is, I use pretty much all of the metalworking tools on woodworking projects.
I used a dial indicator on the table saw the other day to make a series of small fence adjustments to center a groove in each of a big stack of boards that were *almost* the same width, but that I couldn't run through the planer to make them all more the same. caliper the board, tap the fence, saw, repeat. the indicator allowed me to be plenty accurate and more importantly return the fence to nominal zero reliably.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've found them to be the easiest to use to 1. check thickness of wood during planing operations. 2. check the depth of counterbored holes. 3. set blade height on table saw. 4. set cutter height on routers. 5. check the diameters on that pile of drill bits that you can no longer read the engraved size. check the diameter of round dowel stock in a pile all sizes. 5. scratch that hard to reach place in the middle of my back.
They are always in my apron pocket.
Frank

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.