unexpected introduction to kickback

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Greetings all,
I purchased a small tablesaw a few weeks ago to rip some lumber and everything had been going great. Thi past weekend I experienced kickback in the worse way. I've always read about it but I never thought it would happen to me.
I was crosscuting a 2x4 of all things and a piece just flew out of the table saw and was thrown 40 feet past my head. I couldn't believe what I saw. I'm thinking it was a freak accident.
I go forth and do furhter crosscuts and this time I was standing in front of the saw. More wood was thrown from the saw except this time it me directly on the "johnson". I was seeing stars and hearing orchestral music after that one.
Luckily, the wood missed the "twins" (which would have nearly killed me), but it got the "johnson" and boy did it hurt. I've learned since then to stand to the side of the saw if possible in the event kickback occurs.
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"edog" wrote in message

From your description there is nothing "freak" about it. From what you've posted, it looks more like the clueless use of a dangerous tool. If that sounds harsh, it will pale by comparison with missing digits, a hand, or even death from pierced intestines
As you have found out, a table saw is a singularly piss poor crosscutting device, unless you use a miter gauge or well designed crosscut sled, with the later being safer.

You have been lucky thus far, and even the above won't help much more. Take it to heart and quit until you learn more about the methods and ways to use the table saw safely.
There are some good books available with a minimum amount of search.
--
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I don't know Swing, sounds a lot like somebody taking advantage of high tide and a good fishing moon. Casting it out and reeling them in. Either that or a Darwin award candidate.
You be careful down there.
Frank
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"Frank Boettcher" wrote in message

Thanks, Frank ... we're starting to feel a little like a deer in the crosshairs down here. ;)
A big plus is all the neighbors are pitching in and helping each other out ... Tom Watson could write a book about the finer side of human behavior I've seen the past three days.
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Swingman (in snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com) said:
| "Frank Boettcher" wrote in message | || You be careful down there. | | Thanks, Frank ... we're starting to feel a little like a deer in the | crosshairs down here. ;) | | A big plus is all the neighbors are pitching in and helping each | other out ... Tom Watson could write a book about the finer side of | human behavior I've seen the past three days.
Encouraging, isn't it? In 1993 we had major flooding here. On the first night one of the local TV anchors reported that he'd had a phone call to the effect that a few volunteers to fill sandbags would be appreciated. I was there in less than five minutes - and five minutes after that I glanced behind me to see a line of at least ten people waiting for a turn with the shovel I was using. Three sandbags later they started asking: "Aren't you tired /yet/?"
I found out later that the call for "a few volunteers" brought out more than 8,000 people. We lost the battle with the rising rivers; but I've never felt more proud of my neighbors. If you can, snap pictures of those helping others...
Stay safe.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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wrote:

I spent 10 out of the last 20 days down in Gulfport helping out my coastal relatives and getting some of my submerged stored woodworking machines out of a warehouse to bring back hopefully for restoration.
I couldn't turn around without a volunteer group wanting to help me. People from all over the country.
I wonder why the media doesn't cover that. Sure spend a lot of air time on that one percent that are prone to criminal activity during a disaster.
Frank
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"Frank Boettcher" wrote in message

Not sensational enough for news coverage.
What was remarkable to me this time around was the startling difference in the news coverage of the _approach_ of Rita between cable networks/CNN/Fox, et al, and the local stations here in Houston.
All three of the Houston stations, and in particular Dr Neal Frank and Frank Billingsley, were spot on with their conservative, common sense track and force predictions. The cable networks had to throw in tragi-sensationalism in their predictions with the likes of Joe Bastardi, and that other gleeful sounding jerk on Fox.
Bastardi, in particular, lost a lot of credibility in my book despite his supposed weather wizard status on Fox. He missed both Katrina and Rita by miles, but you would have sworn he was god's gift to meteorologists' with his arrogant forecasts of the track and force of both storms.
Consider that they all get 99.9% of their information from the same Federal agency, and you can clearly see the sensationalistic spin of ALL the tragedy TV (cable) networks.
On that note, we're still getting some pretty good howling gusts here close to downtown Houston, but the worst wind appears to be fading ... here's hoping the creeks don't rise.
Best of all, my beloved little shop is intact, equipment is high and dry, and both checks of the finished, but unclosed upon, new residential construction at 3 and 7 AM showed no damage.
Still a little too early to be smug ... however, I do feel better, even with no sleep, for the first time in 72 hours.
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Yep. That, and it's hard to bring down the sitting president with those kinds of stories.

Probably because they also live there, so they have a personal interest in getting the story right. Having a panic on their hands is not in their best interests.

Part of the problem lies in the fact that we *have* 24 hour news channels -- they need to fill up the time with something. Scratch that, with something interesting to a broad audience. Mix in the fact that there is significant competition with Fox, CNN, and MSNBC and you can't have a 24 hour news station delivering facts and information with the vim and pep of C-SPAN -- you'd be killed in the ratings and eventually drummed off the air. Thus, you get all these cable channels rushing to the scene of a potential disaster, setting up shop to show how daring the reporters are, then making apocalyptic predictions to keep people glued to their coverage. Unfortunately, human nature plays a role in this as well, too many people want to see disaster (just not in their neighborhood), so you have people glued to the reports that get provide the biggest vicarious "excitement" to the viewers. So you get people like Geraldo and his counterparts from the other channels trying to outdo each other in how close to the hurricane and flooding they can get without actually drowning (that would probably be counterproductive for them -- for the viewers, we can discuss that later :-) )
OTOH, this serves as a good data point. Look at the coverage you are seeing from something for which you have personal knowledge. Now, apply that same consideration when you see coverage of various events such as the war in Iraq.

Glad to hear it; our thoughts and prayers are with you and everyone down there.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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"Mark & Juanita" wrote in message

the
That was an excellent analysis, Mark ... the first time anyone is involved with a news story they are almost always shocked at the difference between the event and the reportage.
... and 'the most ridiculous item of the day': Bill O'Reilly stating flat out, unequivocally, that "Houston is abandoned".
Hyperbole is the coin of the media realm.
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<snip>

Particularly from that corner of the realm.
Glad you and yours are pretty much OK.
Patriarch, in California, wakened at 4:25 am by a 3.2 quake. Back to sleep by 5:15 am.
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Swingman wrote:

Good to see you came through it OK.
As someone said, part of the problem with so many news sources being available is the need to fill the air. We now have reporting that is similar to the breathless/hard breathing nonsense imparted by sports announcers, who seem to have no tonal qualities whatsover between an awe-inspired whisper or a shout (why do they have mikes?). Our TV is out--I keep forgetting to get new straps for the antenna when I'm in town--the old ones broke when the roofers removed the unit 8 or 10 days ago--so I only get snippets of coverage. Sitting in a local restaurant for lunch the other day, I wondered why whatever local or semi-local channel it was had at least THREE reporters out in the storm getting blown all around, losing sound, just generally making idiots of themselves. I mean, we already know it is windy and wet. Does some 110 pound woman getting wet and knocked around amplify that knowledge? This stuff is right up there with the local dim bulb who climbed into the Virginia Tech wind tunnel during Katrina. At least the wind tunnel lady wasn't putting herself in a position where someone else might have to risk life and limb to haul her out.
Oh, yeah. There was some commentary about having escape routes, helicopters and so forth, supplied. I know technology has advance since I work on choppers something like 40 years ago, but I'd be willing to wager ain't none of them flying in hurricane strength wind. IIRC, 35 MPH was iffy.
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"Charlie Self"wrote in message

I appreciate the concern, Charlie ... gotta say it was really nice to wake up this morning to what should be a "normal" day (at our age however, you never know).
You do appreciate the humdrum a bit more when you've had a clear view of the bullet dodged.
Other than a bit of debris cleanup, removing boards, etc., I think I will unpack the shop and sit out there for a while, a la JOAT, just enjoying the look, feel and smell. Nothing like a bit of woodshop ambience.
> Virginia Tech wind tunnel during Katrina. At least the wind tunnel lady

Yep ... a big thanks to the inventor of the 'remote'.
As much as I dislike most TV programming, the weathercasts during the run up to the storm were invaluable. Having been through a number of hurricanes, and faced with a limited supply of materials, just knowing which side of a house to board/shore up those last few hours (when the landfall models started converging) was a tremendous help.
Knowing that Rita was hitting to the East, therefore the strongest winds would be out of the North, saved a bunch of wear and tear on me.

Nothing has changed about that ... even the news choppers were moved far away and didn't get back into operation until late yesterday evening.
About time for Leon to check in ...
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Frank Boettcher (in snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com) said:
| I spent 10 out of the last 20 days down in Gulfport helping out my | coastal relatives and getting some of my submerged stored | woodworking machines out of a warehouse to bring back hopefully for | restoration.
Take a lot of pictures. I have an uneasy feeling that there'll be a lot of people in the same situation; and others will benefit from the solutions you find...
| I couldn't turn around without a volunteer group wanting to help me. | People from all over the country.
Great isn't it? It's a combination of what I think of as the "white corpuscule" effect and "accelerated hyper-karma" - fortified by the belief "that [adversity] which doesn't kill us outright makes us stronger."
| I wonder why the media doesn't cover that. Sure spend a lot of air | time on that one percent that are prone to criminal activity during | a disaster.
People trying to be the best they can isn't exceptional - it's the general rule. The criminal types /are/ exceptional (and I'll guess they constitute far less than one percent of one percent.)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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wrote:

I plan to do that and I'm still getting help. The people at Empire manufacturing, makers of all manner of rust restoration and preservative materials for woodworking machines and other applications sent me a complete care package. The people at Marathon Electric sent me a complete procedure for disassembling and drying and reworking their motors. It'll take time and some elbow grease,but I think I'll get them back.
Frank
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You need to spend some time with someone and learn how to use a tablesaw. It takes absolutely no effort to cross cut on a tablesaw without risking kickback - you are doing something very wrong.
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-Mike-
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Most likely crosscuting using the fence - either use a standoff block if using the fence for spacing/positioning OR just use the miter gauge and do NOT have the wood in contact with the fence at all. Crosscut sled would be an even better idea
John
On Fri, 23 Sep 2005 07:50:16 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

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I believe there are two ways to have kickback when crosscutting. One is to not use a miter gauge and the other is to use both a miter gauge and fence at the same time. Results can be very bloody! Dave
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Guys,
Thanks for your comments. I don't know what happened. I ripped quite a bit of lumber in that time frame without incident. It could have been an issue with the splitter being out of alignment.
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When the splitter is out of alignment the wood won't go any further. Read what Swingman said again.
Josie
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I hope you are a troll. If not, please don't use power tools until you get some instruction.
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