type of material to make crosscut sled

Page 1 of 2  
I am getting ready to make a crosscut sled. I was going to make the sled out of 3/4" x 2' x 4' material from HD. The types of material they have available, that I am considering, are birch, oak, melamine, and MDF. I am looking for any opinions on which material to use and why. Thanks in advance.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I used some 1/4" plywood, a piece of 2x4, a piece of 2x6 and a couple of strips of maple from some leftover flooring.
Why? It was lying around the shop and one day I wanted to make a crosscut sled.
djb
--
Was that last sig line lame or what?

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wed, Apr 14, 2004, 11:21pm (EDT-2) dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_S.balderstone.ca (Dave Balderstone) says: I used <snip> Why? It was lying around <snip>
Yup. Same general idea, except 2X4 pieces, and a large chunk of that thick stuff, maybe 1 1/2" thick. Next one probably1/2' or 3/4" plywood.
JOAT I will feel equality has arrived when we can elect to office women who are as unqualified as some of the men who are already there. - Maureen Reagan
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually, mine is 3/8, not 1/4...
My next one will be 3/4, 'cause I have a piece lying around the shop and I want to make a sled for 45 degree cuts.
djb
--
Was that last sig line lame or what?

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote in

A google search of the archives from not too long ago will yield a great deal of information, including JOAT's odyssey in finding the perfect, for him, crosscut sled.
Here's the truth, if such a thing is available: You're going to want more than one sled. That's OK. They're cheap to make. The hardest part is storing them in a small shop.
A big panel cutter, with a leading fence. A wide cutoff box, with fences front and back for rigidity, and a place to clamp stop blocks, for repeatable cuts. A small one, for quick use, when you don't want to clear the entire aircraft carrier of a saw deck. One for miter cuts. OK, maybe more than one for miter cuts.
Figure out which blade you're going to use, and stick with it. Part of the function of these things is as sort of a zero clearance insert. A fat kerf blade used with a sled originally used with a thin kerf blade causes surprises the first time, and changes the geometry of the sled.
On a safety note: Glue a big block of hardwood behind where the blade exits the fence on the operator side. Save yourself a nasty surprise.
Patriarch, who enjoys reading JOAT's posts, in spite of the trolls' comments.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thinner stuff will give you more depth of cut... Someday, it'll all be over....
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In rec.woodworking snipped-for-privacy@aol.comEDY (Tom) wrote:

And more flex. My 1/4" oak ply crosscut sled sucks because it bows up. I love my 3/4" MDF sled and I've never needed to cut deeper than it can handle.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Birch or oak ply.
Melamine is too slippery, your work may move. MDF is OK, but it may swell, crack, or chip.
Barry
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 10:34:12 GMT, B a r r y

one sided 1/4" melamine is great though. put the finished side down and wax it.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have used 1/4 Luan, OSB and 1/2 cabinet grade ply.
IMHO 3/4 will make it too heavy, and take a significan bite into depth of cut. Good quality 1/2" or 3/8" ply is my favorite choice.. the best compromise of weight and stability. OSB was not flat enough for my liking, but OK for a specialy sled.
I agree that melamine would be too slippery, really heavy too. Laminated MDF makes a good fence though (nice and flat).
-Steve

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 07:58:07 -0400, "Stephen M"

Sometimes, I find heavy to be good for a sled. Check this out: <
http://www.bburke.com/wood/images/longstockinsled1.jpg
That board is 7 feet long and not supported at the other end. <G>
Barry
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What, no chop saw? Mark
B a r r y wrote:

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Of course I have a chop saw.
I use sleds to cut w-i-d-e parts way more accurately than a sliding compound miter saw can. Not to mention precision dadoing and end rabbetting.
Barry
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
B a r r y wrote...

Just curious -- what do you consider "way more accurately"? Not trying to nitpick, but I've heard this claim before and I'd like to quantify it.
Thanks,
Jim
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I have a General 650 table saw, accurately set up. I also own a Delta Sidekick 10" SCMS, set up as well as I can get it. The General has much less arbor runout than the SCMS, so it makes a _really_ square cut. There is no comparison at all between a properly tuned table saw compared to any miter saw I've ever seen. Maybe I just haven't seen the right miter saw? <G>
When I build cabinets or shelving, I expect the ends to show NO light against my Starrett square, no matter how wide the panel may be. I also expect them to be perfectly square, plump, and level when assembled. The larger the part, the smaller the error needs to be to throw off the works.
I can cut 6' tall, 16" wide 3/4" panels on my sled that will stand on end, alone, without support. I can't do that with my SCMS. The proof is when I assemble a bookcase, and it dosen't matter which end gets slid into the dado first, as it's ALL square and straight.
The SCMS is simply not as good. I haven't measured it, so I can't give you anything like 1/64" over 18" from square, or a percentage of degrees, etc... It just works.
Barry
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 20:31:21 GMT, B a r r y

I meant PLUMB! <G>
I don't know what I was thinking while I was typing.
Barry
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, sure.

I bet I do.... :^)
--
Chris Richmond | I don't speak for Intel & vise versa

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

BBW. Itz OK, it happens.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Keep_it_in_the_newsgroup snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

I don't either, but does she have a sister?
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
B a r r y wrote...

So, your talking about square in two directions: the angle between the face of the board and the end that was crosscut, and the angle between the edge and the end. Do I understand you correctly?
You say that when you check a board that you cut on the table saw against your square, you get no light between the square and the end of the board. When you make the same cut on the SCMS, light peeks through. Is this because the cut is out of square, or because the cut edge is not planar?

Neither can I. My SCMS can make a 13" crosscut, max. (DW708)
Thanks,
Jim
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.