Type of joinery on Mitered cabinet doors

What is the typical type of joinery on mitered cabinet doors?
Is the most common method done with biscuits? I'm not sure how the big production shops cost effectively can do it.
Thanks,
Ted
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Probably biscuits. Although bridle joints (the hasty man's haunched tenon) are pretty quick and cheap to make, if you have a production tenoner.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Ted,
I have done mitered cabinet doors very successfully using biscuits. No failures after several years,
There is an interesting article in the current FWW that details mitered mortise/tenons. Looks interesting, but I don't know if I'm up to that level yet.
I would guess production shops use biscuits, loose tenons or something like that.
Lou

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wonder how many doors are actually mitered vs. using rail and stiles that are shaped 2 profile router or shaper bits. If 45's are used, splines and or biscuits would be a good method to strengthen the joint. I have seen mechanical fasteners shot into the corners also.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The big cabinet shops I've worked in pickup the phone and call their door/drawer guy with dimensions and a style number. ;^)
BW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rik Powe wrote:

Very few production shops use mitered corners on cabinets...they use coped joints cut w/ matching cutters.
For home shop, buscuits are ok but I personally would either use a haunched tenon or a through spline if I were doing a quicker/easier method...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is. of course, the standard for door construction I think. I use cope/stick and MT more often than not if I have a choice. Quick and easy (relatively speaking).
I used mitered corners in a bookself/cabinet project where the design (my own, more or less) called for a bead around the inside (next to panel) and outside edge of the doors.
I think the miters were the easiest way to get crisp 90 degrees at each corner (don't care for the rounded 'routered' corners much).
Lou
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.