TV legal ad focused on table saw injuries

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While watching Delta Force for the 23rd time, I saw an ad from a law firm going after table saw manufacturers. They showed injuries such as missing digits and nasty cuts with many stitches...the narrative from a pretty blon de that said manufacturers did not want you to know there were preventativ e measures available and these saw companies could be held accountable for your injuries. They showed and named the only saw I am aware of that will p revent many of these injuries. It may be just me but it seems like a suitab le comparison would be going after an automaker that did not provide airbag s before they were required by law. I guess miter saws are next. Should hav e seen this coming when McDonalds was successfully sued for selling hot cof fee. I am aware of the argument that a brake cartridge is a small price to pay for safety but wonder if other woodworkers don't share my opinion that safe operation of any saw is the responsibility of the operator, no matter when their device was made and sold. Certainly no slap at SawStop...wish I had one. Wish I had a lot of new tools.
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On 5/6/2014 9:51 PM, BillinGA wrote:

as made and sold. Certainly no slap at SawStop...wish I had one. Wish I had a lot of new tools.

It is my opinion that the only device that will totally prevent injuries is the blob that sits in the middle of your shoulder. Even with the latest technology there will be accidents. To paraphrase Smokey the Bear. "Only you can prevent accidents."
A great example of this is the automobile. If you look at the last 50 years, and look at all of the safety items placed on autos, there should be no accidents or deaths today, or at least it should be less that 0.000001%
Every campaign to add some safety device to an auto said it would lower the death/accident rate by 10% With the hundreds of items added there are essentially no death/accident.
It does not matter what you do to a device to make it safe there will always be someone who figures out a way to use it to create an injury or death.
Have I ever been hurt on a table saw? Yes I did something absolutely stupid and then followed up with some as stupid to correct the problem.
I was ripping a piece of 1X4 to fit under a mirror. My first stupid mistake was to set the out-feed feather board to the width that I wanted to cut, not the to the width of the board I was cutting.
The second stupid mistake was to try to readjust without turning the saw off
Fortunately it only slice the end of the finger, and I lost nothing physical. It would have been significantly different if I had not made the rest of the set up with safety in mind.
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On Wed, 07 May 2014 07:19:01 -0400, knuttle

I'd suggest you're reading it wrong. A seatbelt for example, would lower the death rate well more than 10% from being thrown out of the vehicle or flattening onto the steering wheel. A side air would lower death and injury from being broadsided. No safety device is going to lower all types of injuries. But, it's shear lunacy to suggest that most safety devices are a waste of time. Hell, a brake light is a safety device. Are you claiming they're a useless safety addition?
Just like your safety equipped tablesaw which isn't going to eliminate all injuries, but it has an excellent chance of eliminating the most common serious injury.
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SawStop is simply doing what every other company does with its patents. Don't get me started with why r12 freon was out lawned.
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Not true. Most companies file patents as a purely defensive move. Most of the remaining license patents on a "reasonable and non-discriminatory" basis. Few attempt to corner the market and damned few attempt to get the federal government to put their competition out of business.

Does it grow grass too? ;-)
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On Thu, 08 May 2014 21:52:10 -0500, Leon wrote:

No argument. I just get irritated at what I think are excesses of capitalism. This mornings paper had an article about a low birth rate and said it was good for overpopulation but bad for the economy. Everyone they quoted complained about the economic impact and ignored the population issue. Same with environmental controls. Big coal and big oil scream about damage to their profits.
And no, before the tea party types here foam at the mouth, I don't know of a better system.
I take some solace in the probability that if we keep on being so stupid, we'll become extinct or fall back to the stone age.
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On 5/9/2014 1:46 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

We are in danger, no doubt. What's worse is the kids today are less capable then we were. There reading and math scores are very low. The loss of vocational schooling in the middle and high school (wood shop, metal shop) leave no where for these less educated kids to go.
Add to that our lack of making hard decisions and you have a firestorm brewing.. of catastrophic proportions.
In the old days, people were more adept at adapting, today, less so.
--
Jeff

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"woodchucker" wrote in message
SNIP>>>>>>>>>

We are in danger, no doubt. What's worse is the kids today are less capable then we were. There reading and math scores are very low. The loss of vocational schooling in the middle and high school (wood shop, metal shop) leave no where for these less educated kids to go.
Add to that our lack of making hard decisions and you have a firestorm brewing.. of catastrophic proportions.
In the old days, people were more adept at adapting, today, less so.
--
Jeff

I had 2 wood shop classes in high school. In the 40s. Also aeronautics and
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"Leon" wrote:

----------------------------------------- It was pretty straight forward.
There was THE WAR to win.
Whatever was needed got done.
And yes, the Hollywood propaganda machine was in full glory.
Watch some old flicks from the war years.
Lew
Lew
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On 5/9/2014 1:54 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

And the top income tax rate in 1945 was 94%. Those guys knew how to fund a war.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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On Fri, 09 May 2014 15:16:53 -0400, Mike Marlow wrote:

The world population doubles about every 60 years. It has *not* been that way since "the beginning of time". How long do you think that can continue? How long before the "too many rats in a cage" syndrome gets out of hand?
BTW, the US is right on the average. In 1950 the population was 151 million. Sixty years later, in 2010, the population was 309 million. Both numbers from the census.
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You mean like the earth quakes and wild fires in California? :-)

I'm not sure either well maybe I am but the data is out of context, much like the data that was used to back up the global warming theory. Had we had the same methods of collecting data and same advancements in computers and programming 25-30 years earlier it would have been determined that we were in the middle of global cooling.
The big issue with all of this is that the whole picture is not being looked at, Only the data that happens to be collected at a particular time is being scrutinized. Living near the coast, hurricanes are a hot spot of interest with the weather reporters. Because of global bla bla bla/climate change we saw a ramp up in named storms each year. Are we having more storms than 60 years ago, probably not. It used to be that we did not have the ability to track every storm coming off of the west African coast hence we had fewer storms. Today I think simple cloud cover over the African coast is targeted. Not to mention that if a known storm was not a threat to the US it was not even named unless it actually qualified as a hurricane. And now we are naming winter storm fronts!
Suddenly, relatively speaking, too much data and too little used by those that are totally overwhelmed is the actual problem.
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wrote:

One thing the county where I lived in Vermont did really well was vocational education. They didn't do wood shop or metal shop for the "college bound" kids, rather had a complete school for vo-ed, complete with plumbing, electrical, and carpentry. IIRC, they built a house every year. It was a separate county-wide school, though shared the high school property and some facilities.

True that. The tipping point can't be far away with 1 worker per person on the government check. Demographics isn't going the right way, either.

That's been happening since at least the middle ages. Industrialization, if not civilization itself, demands specialization. OTOH, I've think been successful in finding work easily because I prefer to be a generalist in my profession. I've rarely done exactly the same thing in any two (consecutive, at least) positions. On the down side of that, I'm in mid-level rather than management (though it's the way I like it).
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wrote:

Irrelevant. The fact is that virtually no one paid that rate (so nothing was collected). People either hide money or earn less when the tax rate is confiscatory. It really doesn't take much of an increase in the rate for people to decide that their time is worth more than what they would earn for themselves. This has been shown *many* times throughout history.
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On 5/10/2014 9:32 AM, Leon wrote:

There is to much spin in the climate date. One of the "facts' they use in promoting their religion is the pH of the oceans are going down because of the increase in Carbon Dioxide. This "fact" was based on the observation that there was a decrease in the pH of about 0.06 units, The standards they used of make the measurements are guaranteed by the vendor to be =/-0.05. That makes their "fact" bogus.
They talk about the climate change of 0.1 degrees. There is no statistical method for evaluating date the would call that a change with on any day of the year, the temperatures taken all over the earth will vary over 100 degrees. (-40F at the winter pole to 130F in the equatorial deserts. For a change to be significant by a simple T test the change has to be greater the about 3 times the standard deviation of the measurements. If the global warning people presented a data set like this for drug approval they would be laughed out of the office.
I also like the studies on hurricanes that make the statement that the number of hurricanes have been increasing since the 1970, The low point in the Hurricane cycle which is based on the hurricane counts for several hundred years.
I was really impressed when the global warmer on a ship trapped in the summer ice in Antarctic told the people suffering in one of the coldest winters in recent history, that they should still being prepared to face the global warming.
Finally if you leave the Global warming religion and look at other field you will find the long term studies do not support the global warming data. This is one recent study http://www.planetseed.com/relatedarticle/temperature-change-history
The biggest questionable item in the data of Climate Change is comparing the data from a point that went from a rural area 50 years ago to an asphalt parking lot today. It does not take a genius to realize the Asphalt parking lot will definitely show an increase temperature when compare to its preparking lot days. Every day we pave more parking lots, build more houses with asphalt roofs, and other heat capturing structures, see the temperature change and say the carbon dioxide from a coal burning power plant is causing it.
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And you'd be wrong. I don't think this is the forum for political discussions - except as they affect the subject of the forum: ----------- SEATTLE Global warming is already altering forest landscapes in the U.S. Northwest, increasing wildfire risks and threatening coastal communities, according to a new federal scientific report released Tuesday.
The National Climate Assessment provides a detailed look at the regional and state-level effects of climate change. It lists key concerns for Washington, Idaho and Oregon:
Climate change will alter Northwest forests by increasing wildfire risk and insect and tree disease outbreaks, and by forcing long-term shifts in forest types and species, the report says.
Those impacts are already causing widespread tree die-offs and are certain to cause more forest die-offs by 2040.
Though wildfires are natural events in the Northwest, warmer and drier conditions have helped boost the number and extent of wildfires in U.S. Western forests since 1970s, and that trend is expected to continue.
Higher temperatures and outbreaks of mountain pine beetles, for example, area increasing pine tree die-offs in drier forests.
http://tinyurl.com/k9ksgs9
See also: http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/impacts-adaptation/forests.html
-------- You may deny GW, but people working in the forest are seeing it's affects. Some species of trees will no longer grow in certain areas. Replanting after clear-cut fails again and again. Sustainable harvests are moving north while southern forests don't grow as they have in the past. Etc.
--
-----------------------------------------------------
Free Software - Baxter Codeworks www.baxcode.com
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On 5/10/2014 10:17 AM, Baxter wrote:

Forrest fires are nothing new and there will always be a first for some lovations. Follow the money.

Follow the money.

Maybe it will maybe it will not. Follow the money.

Maybe, the prediction is so far off that those doing the predicting may not be around to answer. follow the money.

this trend has happened over and over through out the centuries followed by global cooling.

When you can't determine the reason for a problem you blame either Global Warming or Bush.
Follow the money. If money were not involved with this hype there would not be another word said about it. Global warming is extremely profitable and will continue to be as long as we try to reverse something that may not in face be a problem or even exist.
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wrote:

Why is the solution (to everything) higher taxes?
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On 5/10/2014 6:06 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

To support the ignoramuses that believe that the government makes money vs. taking it from us.
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wrote:

Socialists R us.
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