Turning Walls Into Floors

I have an 80+ year old house. Originally, wallpaper was hung on 9 " wide by " thick strips of wood. Some years later, drywall was hung over the wallpaper. Decades of cracking (foundation issues) and shoddy patch jobs have convinced me to replace most of the drywall.
I should also mention that approx 1000 sq feet of flooring needs to be replaced. The original hardwood laminate flooring is disintegrating beyond repair over much of the house.
Since I'm taking down the old drywall, I got to thinking...why not take down the wood planks from the walls and the ceiling, plane them and use them for floors? I believe the wood is pine...many strips are 15+ feet long...and surely over 80 years the wood is warp-proof. There are knots and nail holes. It seems like the holes could be filled with something (what would work best?)
I would have to buy a planer (never used one before). I'm willing to buy a good one since I'll be saving a ton on flooring!
If I had a good planer...Couldn't I remove all the nails, plain the planks to a uniform thickness, sand 'em (some planers can take sander attachments, I believe), stain 'em and nail 'em down?
Surely I'm missing something. It sounds too easy. What think ye?
Many thanks in advance.
Rawls.
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I have an 80+ year old house. Originally, wallpaper was hung on 9 " wide by " thick strips of wood. Some years later, drywall was hung over the wallpaper. Decades of cracking (foundation issues) and shoddy patch jobs have convinced me to replace most of the drywall.
I should also mention that approx 1000 sq feet of flooring needs to be replaced. The original hardwood laminate flooring is disintegrating beyond repair over much of the house.
Since I'm taking down the old drywall, I got to thinking...why not take down the wood planks from the walls and the ceiling, plane them and use them for floors? I believe the wood is pine...many strips are 15+ feet long...and surely over 80 years the wood is warp-proof. There are knots and nail holes. It seems like the holes could be filled with something (what would work best?)
I would have to buy a planer (never used one before). I'm willing to buy a good one since I'll be saving a ton on flooring!
If I had a good planer...Couldn't I remove all the nails, plain the planks to a uniform thickness, sand 'em (some planers can take sander attachments, I believe), stain 'em and nail 'em down?
Surely I'm missing something. It sounds too easy. What think ye?
I believe you're missing much and much of it may be structural. Houses of that era commonly had 1X10 shiplap on the interior side of walls. I suspect you will find there is not a header in the house over any door or window. That's because structural support was provided by that shiplap in addition to the exterior siding on exterior walls and shiplap on both sides on interior walls. You can remove the shiplap though you should be prepared to reframe doors and windows with proper headers on load-bearing walls. That shiplap also served to help the walls resist racking and removing it will lessen that resistance. You could use the boards for flooring. Unlike the pine grown today whose primary function is fast growth, old growth loblolly (?) pine was denser and thus harder. Purchase a metal detector before planing; you'll want to find any metal in the wood before you run it through your planer blades. Floor refinishing suppliers will have filler by the bucket that will sand very well. You should consider laying a plywood subfloor though that could present issues relative to existing floor height and surrounding rooms. It was common practice to have but a single layer floor. Apply generous amounts of Liquid Nails between the subfloor and your pine finish floor. It's a monumental task that, in the end, may cost you more in labor and replacement materials for the walls you rob than you save on the flooring. Now you're going to need new door jambs, baseboards, and door and window casing. You'll be changing the wall thickness which means your windows and doors will no longer be the correct depth.
--
NuWave Dave in Houston



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Thanks. You definitely know the type of house I'm talking about.
I had considerd the wall thickness issue. I was thinking about replacing the robbed boards with 3/4" plywood or scrap 1x8 pieces. I figured I'd leave the short pieces (in between windows, etc.) in place. If I only go for the long pieces, I don't have to replace as much...and I should still have enough to cover the floor.
I had not considered the structural angle. You think the plywood would be a good enough replacement (keeping in mind that much of the wall retains the original planks)?
Another benefit to doing all this is I can easily add insulation to the walls!

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"Rawls" wrote in message

Structural plywood (sheathing) will work ... it is what is used in residential construction to give "shear wall" strength to exterior walls and some interior walls.
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Last update: 2/20/07
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I have to agree with the above post. Be prepared to do some reframing. You also need to ask yourself how you are going to attach this flooring to the floor, do you need to add a tongue and groove? If your interested in a planner that can also sand your talking about something like the http://www.woodmastertools.com/ sold in the US and Canada. Though you might to be able to buy a planer and drum sander separate for the same price. If this was my job I'd use the planner to rough dimension everything, the shaper to add a tongue and groove, install the flooring and then have it sanded and finished in the house.
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