Tuning Up A Century Old Dresser - With Roller Guides

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On Sunday, April 10, 2016 at 2:06:32 PM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

You are right, I didn't post any dimensions, so here they are:
The interior of the drawers are 36" wide, 16 1/4" deep at the outer edges, 18 1/4" deep at the center.
I clamped the bottom of the drawers to the back of box in three spots, completely closing the gap along the back. The front and sides of the bottoms are fully seated in the grooves of the box. I placed a 36" straight edge across the bottom of the interior of the drawers and measured the gap between the straight edge and the bottom of the drawer at the center of the bottom.
3/8" on one drawer, 1/2" on the other. I'm guessing that those are considerable gaps, probably too much for the dampening and weighting technique, correct?

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On Sunday, April 10, 2016 at 7:35:44 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

No, not at all. That degree of bow is a nominal curve, in both drawers, an d should be easy to reverse, to some extent, using the wetted technique. I f it bent one way, it should be able to be bent the other way. If still in doubt, bend it slowly, over time, then allow to dry. At least see what e ffect that has.
Sonny
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On Sunday, April 10, 2016 at 9:06:31 PM UTC-4, Sonny wrote:

If it bent one way, it should be able to be bent the other way. If still in doubt, bend it slowly, over time, then allow to dry.
Yeah, it took ~100 years to bend one way, and my daughter doesn't graduate for another month, so I have lot's of time to reverse the bend. ;-)
So what about simply leaving the bottom in the drawer, wetting the raw bott om and then placing the drawer face down under a table with an upside down dea d man wedged between table and the center of the bottom - over correcting the curve - and letting it dry? I'd use the "bottom" of the deadman to spread t he pressure out (slightly) as opposed to it being a single pressure point.
Thoughts?

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On Sunday, April 10, 2016 at 8:32:56 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

It doesn't matter what technique you use to reverse (over correct) the bow/ curve. If need be, try several techniques, see which one might work the b est.
Again, as you bend it (slowly), listen for small/tiny cracking sounds. Be nd the wood slowly (over a few hours, maybe), rewetting it periodically (if need be), if those small cracking sounds are heard. Old air dried cured wood will act like kiln dried wood.... sometimes difficult to rebend/reshap e, with either wet or steam bending. In these difficult cases, you heard those small cracking sounds, as it's being bent/shaped.
Sonny
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On Monday, April 11, 2016 at 8:02:34 AM UTC-4, Sonny wrote:

best.

if need be), if those small cracking sounds are heard. Old air dried cure d wood will act like kiln dried wood.... sometimes difficult to rebend/resh ape, with either wet or steam bending. In these difficult cases, you hear d those small cracking sounds, as it's being bent/shaped.

Thanks for the advice. I'll rig up something that I can extend downward in small increments to apply pressure as I listen to the drawer bottom.
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On Sat, 9 Apr 2016 18:09:41 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

I recently reinforced sagging drawer bottoms - on a modern dresser - from the inside of the drawers ! I had some large < 1 1/2 inch > hardwood dowel that I ripped in half - the halves were surprisingly stiff & strong - placed them inside & screwed in from the drawer back ; toe-nail-screwed from inside the drawer into the drawer front ; and up through the drawer bottom. The round-top of the dowel looked ok inside the drawer, too ... The crappy drawer construction made it difficult to fix any other way - - you might have better options with a solid antique. John T.
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On Sunday, April 10, 2016 at 12:12:52 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

That's a consideration. Thanks
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The hardwood brace/support also serves to strengthen the drawer structure somewhat - joining the drawer-front to the drawer back at the center. All the other discussion about just reversing the drawer-bottom curve, without adding bracing - seems like it might be temporary ? John T.
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On 04/11/2016 8:47 AM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote: ...

Depends on whether the drawer is subsequently overloaded again or not.
--


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On Monday, April 11, 2016 at 8:47:58 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

Reshaping, only, is not always temporary, if the over correction is sufficient to maintain a flattened result.
I'd agree that extra support would assure further stability. A narrow metal angle iron type bracing, under neath, would help.
I think someone mentioned placing a cross piece/divider inside the drawers, to function similarly. A divider is a good idea, also, and probably wouldn't look unsightly, either.
Sonny
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On 4/9/2016 9:09 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
> The drawer knobs were a little loose, so I removed the "screws" > (nope!) > planning to add some glue and toothpicks to tighten them back up. It > turns out that the "screws" are actually bolts that thread into metal > inserts in the knobs. The inserts have a pair of points that dig into > the drawer front to prevent them from turning. Well, that's the theory > anyway. > > http://imgur.com/0nhHOKd
> The problem is that once the knobs get loose, they spin and the points
> carve a circular groove in the drawer front leaving nothing for the
> points to hold onto. Some of the inserts are also stripped, so I have > a some work to do on the knobs.
The inserts in the knobs look like standard modern day Tee-nuts. Don't know when they were invented, but the two pin ones are older than the 4 pin nuts. At any rate, you shouldn't need the pins at all to stop spinning. Current day knobs just tighten down and don't spin. If these don't tighten down enough to stop spinning, I'd think the bolt is too long, or the knob is spinning around the tee-nut. If spinning around the tee-nut some epoxy should fix it.

The picture indicates the bottom is either nailed to the bottom, or fitted in groves on 3 sides, and open/nailed to the back, so removal should be easy. I would remove the bottom, flip it over and screw it wherever nails were used previously to attach it.
--
Jack
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On Sunday, April 10, 2016 at 12:21:25 PM UTC-4, Jack wrote:

Having used my share of Tee-nuts, I can say with confidence that these are similar but a far cry from "standard modern day Tee-nuts". The pins on a Tee-nut point in the same direction as the threaded shaft and are used to hold the tee-nut in the material that the tee-nut is in.
http://www.theboltbin.com/89-home_default/5-16-x-1-2-tee-nut-4-prong-z.jpg
These inserts have the points pointed in the opposite direction so that they stick into the material that the object with the insert is attached to.

Maybe the bolt stretched over the past 100+ years? (kidding!)

Actually, on the ones that won't tighten down, it appears that the inserts are stripped. I used the standard glue and toothpick method and I was able to crank down on the bolts with substantial force. We'll see how long they hold.

I wish removal was easy. I tried to remove one of the bottoms and it certainly doesn't slide right out. The other one seems looser but I haven't removed the nails yet to see if it jammed like the other one.
In any case, the interiors of the bottoms (and of the entire drawer) are finished as shown here:
http://imgur.com/wOABR4V http://imgur.com/DlOn3QB
There is also damage (grooves) on the bottoms where they have dragged on the metal tabs used as stops. The grooves are too deep to be sanded away and besides, I'm sure I would never be able to match the bottom finish to the side finish *and* make it look 100+ years old.
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On Sat, 9 Apr 2016 18:09:41 -0700 (PDT)

good to keep nice stuff in the family
was going to put drawer glides on some old drawers that just slide on bare wood now
but i rubbed wax on the both parts and the drawers move so easy they almost fly all the way out until you get used them sliding so easy
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