Tung Oil?


I have never used tung oil; it seemed too expensive for what it was.
At a garage sale today I bought a large, very old, bottle of pure tung oil for $0.50. I emptied it into a clean bottle and found it was a very syrupy brown liquid. I put in about 10% turp and it thinned up to a reasonable consistancy.
I put some on a scrap of mahogany, with BLO next to it. It is hard to tell the two apart, but maybe the tung is a tad lighter. Don't know how it dries since I just did it.
Does this sound like a usable product, or has it gone bad from long storage? The brand is "Hope". Seems like a good idea...
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I swear by Formbys Tung Oil Finish which I get at walmart. I do lots of woodworking and the finish is great. I've put 20-30 coats on a lot of my pieces. I use the high gloss and get that glassy deep look.
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Now that you've opened it and brought in fresh air, the clock will begin to tick.
It looks a bit lighter in two ways - won't darken the wood as much, and dries a bit hazy, like a satin varnish. If that's what you're after, have at it.
I think it stinks, so I use linseed. Smells better.
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The 100% tung I got from Woodcraft and Rockler was nearly clear--only very light tan. But definitely syrupy. I followed advice I found somewhere to use 50/50 mix with solvent for deep penetration of first coat.

Having used turp for the solvent, you probably won't be able to tell, but the smell is dramatically different. BLO has a very strong (but not unpleasant to me) smell. Tung has a very mild smell that reminds me a little of peanut oil.

My experience is that it is slower curing than BLO, but faster than raw linseed oil, of course.

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Toller wrote:
<<I have never used tung oil; it seemed too expensive for what it was.
At a garage sale today I bought a large, very old, bottle of pure tung oil for $0.50.
SNIP
Does this sound like a usable product, or has it gone bad from long storage? The brand is "Hope". Seems like a good idea...
SNIP
<<
I never understand this line of thinking. If you buy an ancient bottle of tung oil, what were you thinking you would use it for? It may or may not have been opened before, and on old cans and bottles it can be really hard to tell. So is this something you would use on a project? On a piece of furniture that you have sweated over to make as perfect as you can? Pretty bold not knowing the actual age or history of the bottle.
I wouldn't use it on anything. Watch the Wooodcraft near you; about twice a year they put on a pint or 24 oz bottle for $9.95. Then you get fresh stuff, ready to go that will thin and mix correctly.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

What he bought is pefectly good and useable, so why not use it?
--

FF


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Because it is $10 bottle for $0.50. If it is good, then I have a gloat; if it is bad I have lost $0.50.
The piece I tested it on yesterday dried nicely and looks good. I think it is a gloat, but will test it on a larger piece before getting carried away.
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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:
<<What he bought is pefectly good and useable, so why not use it?
--

<<FF

No reason not to if that's what you want. I tend to think of things in
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

Fair enough, I am with you all the way here.
Then again, if you have never sat in a Mercedes Benz and you want to see what it feels like, you would't go out and buy a brand spanking new one, would you <g>. Of course, it wouldn't help either to get a 35 year old jalopy as a try out...
... as I seem to recall the OP said he'd never used the stuff before.
-P.
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My can of tung oil is well over 10 years old. It's a bitch to prise open the first time when I want to put it back into action, but other than that it's good as gold. I thin it with vege turps 10%-30% for first and second application.
Can be very slow drying - I used it on a eucalypt hearth surround and we had to step over it for weeks, but it's given that bluegum a beautiful purple finish and nothing has marred/stained that timber in 15 years now :-)
It's definitely a tryer-outer though, on some timbers I don't much care for its appearance, on others it's just beautiful.
-P.
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