TS: "Why don't they" query

Folks -
I've been getting quite a bit done out in the shop the last week or so, and it feels GREAT to have some room to move around... But I got to thinking as I've been swapping between Dado blades, combos and ply blades.... Why don't TS mfrs put an arbor lock on tablesaws? Chop saws have them, circ saws have them... It would once and for all eliminate wrasslin' with either jamming the blade, or in my case, wishing I had a second wrench - the previous owner lost it.
Another thought I had, is why don't they make the end of the arbor shaft unthreaded for just a short length? That way you could easily get the nut in place on the arbor so it wouldn't fall off, THEN tighten it. Maybe the end of the shaft would hit the clearance plate at 45 degrees, but even a small "landing zone" would help. Obviously it would make mounting dado stacks, stabilizers, wire wheels (just seeing if'n you're paying attention) and arbor washers much easier.
John Moorhead Happily covered with tree powder
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Why not call the manufacturer of the saw and buy one. Or just buy a thin open end wrench of the proper size.
Agree with your other points. It would be nice to have that throat opening an inch or so wider. Ed http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/
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wrote:

How about a hinged top that you could just lift up to 90 degrees to get to the whole schmeer?
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 02:15:34 GMT, "John Moorhead"

Plywood blade? Buy a better combo.

So get a wrench. If the wrench is too fat, grind it down. Hey- check bike shops- bikes use skinny wrenches sometimes.
I don't need an arbor lock on my table saw (Delta Contractor).

Not sure I'd want that on my saw. I'd have to tip the blade a bunch to clear the insert slot. And if the blade is tipped, it might not slide on anyway. My good blade won't stand for any angle, it is almost a perfect slide fit between the hole in the blade, and the O.D. of the arbor.
Threads are cut the way they are for a reason. Don't re-invent the wheel; don't try to re-engineer Acme threads. It might actually be harder to start the nut on such a shaft as you describe.
Just my .02. hey, glad you got to make some saw dust anyway! I've been productive too the past two weeks, the pressure of the 12/25 deadline does wonders for my productivity.
-Dan V.
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<<

Plywood blade? Buy a better combo.
<<
I tried a plywood blade once, but it kept splintering. Had to switch to maple or cherry. The hardwood blades are more durable than plywood, but I've heard that they even make them out of steel now. I'm thinkin' of trying one. ;-)
Curt Blood
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (CBlood59) wrote in

Yeah, I know whatcha mean... made the mistake of goin' with the MDF blade my last project. Heavy bugger, and the durn thing kept changing sizes every time some sweat dripped on it!
-R Boggs
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I would agree that it would be nice to have a small 'landing' at the end of the acme thread. I am constantly having to open the door on my cabinet saw and sift through the debris to find that stupid nut - Yeah, I'm clumsy. With my previous contractor's saw I had to chase it around the shop floor. A small unthreated area would help get it started.
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    Greetings and Salutations...
On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 02:15:34 GMT, "John Moorhead"

a tablesaw, the mechanism is buried under the table with only a small slot for access. My hands are big enough (and I am NOT bragging) that it is hard to get both of them through the opening for the table insert...which would make a lock a challenge. However, since my unisaw DOES have flats on the arbor, the wrench holds it JUST fine.

and easily. Let's see if I can describe it!     Hold the nut to the end of the arbor with your thumb and SECOND finger. Put your first finger through the hole, to kind of press the nut onto the end of the arbor and give it an axle to spin on. with your thumb and second finger, turn the nut backwards (as if removing it) until you feel/hear a small click. Immediately turn it the OTHER way to tighten it (and yes I DO recall that TS arbors have left hand threads). It should thread right on with no further problems.     When I was shown this trick, which works for ALL nuts, it took a few tries to get comfortable with moving the nut...but, now, it is second nature and I don't even have to think about it.     Oh yea...also make sure there are no burrs on the end of the arbor threads...I have, in the past, taken a couple of LIGHT cuts at about a 45 degree angle with a file, to taper the end threads a tad...which also helps get things lined up and keep from dropping the nut.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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----- Original Message -----
Newsgroups: rec.woodworking Sent: Thursday, December 16, 2004 9:15 PM Subject: TS: "Why don't they" query

Oh, using the two wrench thing is great isn't it. How many times has one slipped off the nut and then you bury the side of your hand into the blade. Man, those carbide teeth are sharp! I was considering buying one of these "blade locks" from Lee Valley. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?SID=&ccurrency=2&pageE988&category=1,240,45884 That may make swapping blades easier.
Tony
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Tony Mo wrote:

Not easier than two wrenches IME. The flats on the arbor for a second wrench are about the only thing I miss about the ol' POS TS. My new one just has a turned metal bit you couldn't get a wrench on if your life depended on it, so I bought a Blade-Loc.
It doesn't really work very well, and the blade chews it up something awful. It does work better than stuffing a piece of wood in the hole. Barely.
I guess when I mangle it beyond use, I'll probably try something like holding the blade with a Quik-Grip or a gloved hand. I can't really recommend the Blade-Loc. Plenty of other things at LV to buy instead.
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I remember when they gave those blade locks away when you bought a blade (even a cheap one). That's how I got mine and now I can't believe what they want to charge for them.
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving



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TBone wrote:

Thinking back on my not recommending these, I should throw out some disclaimer stuff. The blurb in the catalog talks about how the thing has little ridges (or whatever term they actually used) inside that lock the blade down. Mine probably doesn't work very well because I sawed through those immediately. The factory blade on my saw was on so tight I ultimately had to hook a piece of 1/4" steel rod under a tooth, and I used so much force getting the nut off that I bent the rod and ruined the blade. That thing was on TIGHT. The Blade-Loc might have fared better overall if my first use for it hadn't been trying to remove *that* thing.
I still prefer the two wrench approach though.
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I agree but many saws don't give you that ability.
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On a similar note, why not a spindle lock on bench grinders? These things have nothing to stop the spindle from turning when you snug the nut. What ends up happening if you hold onto the opposite side is *that* side will loosen as you tighten. The real struggle often occurs when you try to get the damn nut off to change out a wheel.
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